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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

The 'I' in the Margins: Poetry, Memoirs, Letters and Paratexts by Reformed exiles

Posted By Clara Marías, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 15, 2020

In the last decades, increasing attention has been paid to the works written or translated by Reformed exiles during the 16th and 17th centuries. From a European perspective, the monographies published by the members of the research group EMoDiR are a good example, and on the Spanish reformed exiles, scholars such as Carlos Gilly, Massimo Firpo, Ignacio García Pinilla, Doris Moreno, James Amelang, or Rady Roldán-Figueroa have edited and studied several works, expanding our knowledge about them. However, these translations and original writings from Juan de Valdés, Francisco de Enzina, Juan Pérez de Pineda, Casiodoro de Reina, Antonio del Corro, Tomás Carrascón, Nicolás y Sacharles, among others, have been studied from the perspective of History or History of Religion, rather than as literary works and often without a focus on their self-fashioning perspective and the ideological and political intentions of the authors.

For this reason, this panel invites proposals from scholars interested in analyzing the poetry, memoirs, letters and paratexts (introductions, dedicatory epistles, etc.) from Reformed exiles, dealing with the manners in which the authors, far from their countries and often persecuted and in danger, living “in the margins”, presented their lives and ideas and their faith and conversion by means of various rhetorical strategies, including dissimulation, persuasion, fictionalization or confrontation.

The proposals should study works by reformed exiles from any European country with a Catholic majority during the Early Modern period, with a literary approach to the poetry, memoirs, letters, prologues and dedicatory epistles selected for discussion.

Interested participants should send the following in a single document to Clara Marías (cmarias@us.es) by August 7, 2020:

  • Paper title
  • A single page CV
  • Abstract (about 500 words)

Tags:  Cultural Networks  Diaries  emotional history  European history  European literature  exile  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italy  Literature  memoirs  Memory Studies  Networks  Philosophy  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Rhetoric  self-fashioning  Spanish literature  translation 

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Lists in Early Modern Women’s Writing: Life and Literature *extended deadline*

Posted By Nikolina Hatton, Friday, July 10, 2020
Updated: Monday, August 3, 2020

Lists proliferate in texts written by women and texts written about women, from the typical enumeration of “women worthies” within the querelle des femmes tradition to the lists of possessions and household accounts found in early modern commonplace books. Within women’s writing itself, functional everyday lists and literary lists sometimes merge, such as in Isabella Whitney’s “The Maner of her Wyll”—a poetic description of and reflection on London in the form of a Last Will and Testament.  

This panel seeks to reflect on the forms and functions of the list within early modern women’s writings and everyday lives. Literary studies has seen a recent resurgence of interest in the list, as scholars have noted the list’s ability to bring together questions of functionality and literariness. Scholars have shown that, as a form that deceptively appears simpler than it really is, the list and examinations of it shed light on the evolution and manipulation of literary conventions and can further signal important discursive distinctions between texts that at first feel otherwise quite similar. Such a project intersects well with the study of women’s writing in the early modern period, not only because lists appear so often in investigations into women’s everyday lives, but also because the corpus of literature by women is generally marked by subtle but significant deviations within the genres deemed acceptable for women writers. In material culture studies as well, the list has been hailed as an affordance for accomplishing everyday tasks as well as a container that emphasizes metonymy and materiality over metaphorical meanings. This panel seeks to open up these questions by broadly investigating the use of the list within early modern women’s utilitarian and literary writings.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send your paper’s title (max 15 words), a short abstract (150 words), your CV, and institutional affiliation/contact details to Nikolina Hatton (n.hatton@lmu.de) by 10 August 2020. A longer abstract may also be included in addition.

Tags:  Book History  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Daily Life  Diaries  Ekphrasis  English Literature  fiction  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Global Literature  History  interdiscplinary  Italian Literature  Libraries  Material Culture  Material Studies  Materiality  Memory Studies  networks  poetry  Portuguese Literature  Print  Spanish literature  Women and Gender 

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Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

Posted By Alice Brooke, Friday, July 10, 2020

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

The politics of the early modern Atlantic World are inseparable from religion. Indeed, the role of Western Christianity, both Protestant and Catholic, in nation formation and colonial expansion across the Spanish, Portuguese, English, and French-speaking worlds is indisputable. In recent decades, however, increasing attention has been paid to the multi-faceted ways in which religious literary texts were used both to uphold and to question the political status quo. In particular, scholars have highlighted the importance of non-Christian religious voices in changing our understanding of the role of literary creation as a source of resistance to dominant political narratives. This panel invites proposals that explore in new ways this relationship between religious faith and literary creation throughout the Atlantic World. In what ways was religious literature used both to affirm and to resist imperial narratives? What impact did these texts have on wider discourses of nationalism, imperialism, and expansion? How did the lives of Jews, Muslims, and other religious minorities intersect with colonialist aims? How does a deeper understanding of the presence of non-Christian voices change how we understand the relationship between religion and politics in this period? What impact do these discourses continue to have on the place of religious communities in these regions in the present day?

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alice.brooke@merton.ox.ac.uk or imogen.choi@exeter.ox.ac.uk by August 7 2020:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract
  • A single page CV

Tags:  Americas  British Empire  Comparative Literature  English Literature  eurocentrism  French Empire  French Literature  Geographies  Global Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Missions  networks  Portuguese Empire  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  theology 

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The Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Courtier and the Formation of Modern Identity

Posted By Armando Maggi, Sunday, July 5, 2020
Updated: Sunday, July 5, 2020

The literature on the concept of 'courtier' in early-modern Europe is vast but also conventional. This session aims at revisiting this key concept by analyzing it diachronically, that is by bringing to the fore the essential elements that deviated from its hypothetical perfection. This session welcomes papers from French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish colleagues whose work may enlighten our understanding of the 'courtier' as a quintessential reflection of the dynamic reflection on the nature of self-understanding vis-à-vis its social, external challenges and interactions. Papers on classic authors such as Baltasar Gracián, Castiglione or Torquato Accetto are welcome, but contributions on much less familiar texts such as the Portuguese Corte na aldeia are especially welcome. Analyses of visual representations are welcome as well.

Interested panelists must send the following material: title, abstract (150 words) and updated C.V. to Prof. Armando Maggi (amaggi@uchicago.edu) no later than AUGUST 10.

Tags:  Art History  Baltasar Gracián  Baroque culture  Castiglione  French Literature  Italian literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Portuguese Literature  Spanish literature  the courtier  Torquato Accetto 

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Althusser's Renaissance

Posted By Martin Moraw, Saturday, June 13, 2020

Louis Althusser’s thought is receiving renewed attention in the humanities and social sciences. This session seeks to bring together scholars of various disciplines and specializations to explore the potential of a return to Althusser in the particular context of Renaissance/early modern studies. Contributions may reflect on Althusser’s writings on early modern figures, make use of Althusserian concepts to produce new readings of early modern texts, or engage relevant theoretical questions.

Topics may include: Althusser, Machiavelli, politics; Althusser, Galileo, science; Althusser, Spinoza, philosophy; structure, conjuncture, contradiction, overdetermination, uneven development; Althusser and theater; symptomatic reading; ideology, subjectivation; aleatory materialism, the encounter.

Please send proposals including a paper title, an abstract (200 words), and a one-paragraph CV to Martin Moraw (martin.moraw@aucegypt.edu) by July 31, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy 

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Patronage and innovation: how patronage shaped textual culture in the early modern world

Posted By Annet den Haan, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Studying patronage is crucial for understanding the early modern world. Indeed, recent scholarship on patronage covers the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, it studies countries as diverse as Italy and the Dutch Republic, and it focuses on artifacts ranging from scientific theses to funerary poems, from paintings to coins. Although scholars of patronage occasionally cross borders between countries, genres, or time periods, we believe we can bring scholarship a step further by comparing contexts systematically to uncover underlying mechanisms. In this panel, we focus on textual patronage, by which we mean patronage of clients (authors, editors, printers) who produce texts of any kind.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how textual patronage relates to the client’s intellectual and artistic freedom, and hence to originality and innovation. In which cases are authors free to create something new? Does economic or social success lead to more autonomy? Is patronage a stimulus for innovation, or does it prevent authors from being innovative? In other words, is patronage limiting or liberating? The question of what causes innovation is one of the points of focus within the interdisciplinary field of the history of knowledge, and several tentative explanations have been suggested. By focusing on patronage relations, we add another perspective to this debate.

Our aim is to compare case studies of patronage across regions, periods, communities, ideologies, and genres, in order to draw tentative conclusions about patronage in relation to intellectual and artistic freedom. We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. We intend to make the panel a collaborative effort and would like to discuss in advance with all presenters which specific questions we will all answer, in order to systematically study the mechanisms of innovation in textual products of patronage.

Submission guidelines

Interested participants are invited to submit the following:

  • a 400-word abstract as well as a 150-word short version
  • a curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address; max. 5 pages
  • paper keywords.

Please send all materials to Annet den Haan (a.denhaan@uu.nl) and to Nina Geerdink (n.geerdink@uu.nl). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America. Please not that RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Music  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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The Renaissance Cicero

Posted By Marijke Crab, Friday, June 5, 2020

Call for Papers: The Renaissance Cicero

 

The Renaissance Society of America, Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

 

Submission Deadline: 20 July 2020

 

Although it might be exaggerated to state that the Renaissance was vor allen Dingen eine Wiederbelebung Ciceros, und erst nach ihm und dank ihm des übrigen klassischen Altertums” (T. Zielinski), it is certainly impossible to overestimate Cicero’s cultural importance in the early modern period. All humanists were avid readers of both his speeches and his treatises on philosophy, rhetoric, and law; moreover, they regarded him as a political role model, admired his literary genius and were, even to a fault, enthusiastic imitators of his style.

 

Since Cicero’s afterlife is one of the most varied and wide-ranging of any classical author, this session proposes to study his Renaissance reception in the broadest sense possible. To this end, proposals from all disciplines are encouraged. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the study of:

  • early modern editions, translations, commentaries, florilegia, etc. of Cicero’s works;
  • early modern biographies of Cicero (vitae Ciceronis);
  • intertextuality with Cicero’s works in early modern literature, either in Latin or in the vernacular;
  • early modern appreciations, or criticism, of Cicero as a writer, philosopher, statesman, or historical person;
  • Cicero as a literary and stylistic model, the debate on Ciceronianism, and his importance for early modern rhetoric and epistolography.

Interested participants are invited to send a 150-word abstract and short CV to Marijke Crab (marijke.crab@kuleuven.be) by 20 July 2020. Please follow the submission guidelines set out at https://www.rsa.org/page/AnnualMeetingSubmissionsGuide.

Tags:  Book History  Classical Tradition  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  Humanism  Italian Literature  Neo-Latin Literature  Rhetoric 

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Call for Papers: The Long History of the French Early Modern Pamphlet

Posted By Elisa Jones, Tuesday, June 2, 2020

The Renaissance Society of America, Dublin, April 7–10, 2021

Submission Deadline: July 3, 2020

Recent scholarship in the history of the book and reading practices has emphasized the need for a more comprehensive and interdisciplinary investigation of ephemeral print and premodern reading practices. Often seen as ‘the crowd made text’, pamphlets were at once individual items conveying specific messages, and contributory parts to broader movements. They were objects designed to reach a large audience that were engaged with individual readers. Although many have survived down to the present day, we are aware that even more have been lost.

The history of the so-called French political pamphlet as both a material form and cultural object over the course of the early modern period offers a unique opportunity to address the complex and overlapping motivations for writing, publishing, buying, engaging with and keeping pamphlets. In a session planned for RSA Dublin 2021, “The Long History of the French Pamphlet” proposes to explore the printed pamphlet as a material and cultural object in France from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries. Papers that place French pamphlets in a larger comparative frame, or that focus on the material study, use, or reading practices of pamphlets, are encouraged, as are papers that approach new methodologies in pamphlet studies. Proposals from all disciplines are encouraged.

The session is sponsored by the Newberry Library's Center for Renaissance Studies, and is a part of its larger project of expanding the time frame of the Newberry Library’s French Pamphlets Digital Initiative and re-creating it as a research and pedagogical resource in cooperation with a network of scholars interested in the pamphlet as a form. This resource includes over 38,000 digitized French pamphlets from the sixteenth century to the French Revolution, and is free to the public online. The results of these conversations will be made available as a part of this digital resource with author attribution, further widening the conversation of pamphlet studies. For this reason, if Covid-19 prevention measures affect RSA 2021 scheduling, the session will be held virtually.

To apply, please send a 150-word abstract and short CV to co-organizers Elisa J. Jones (jonese@newberry.org), 2019–20 CRS Postdoctoral Fellow and Assistant Professor of History at the College of Charleston, and Sara Barker (S.K.Barker@leeds.ac.uk), Associate Professor of History at the University of Leeds, by Friday, July 3, 2020.

Tags:  Associate Organizations  Book History  Comparative Literature  French Literature  Rhetoric 

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