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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Gendered Sins: Vices in Spanish Literature in the Light of Moral and Medical Casuistry

Posted By Marlen Bidwell-Steiner, Friday, July 17, 2020

Early Modern Spanish imaginary literature very often yields a peculiar economy of violation and punishment. Some perpetrators get through without sanctions; apparently innocent protagonists become suspects and consequently victims in a disturbing system of "poetic justice"; and yet others have to accept an unrewarding settlement to restore the social order. In Spanish literature, honor or honra are the markers for male social integrity, whereas shame sticks primarily to the female body. Thus, the performed imaginary sanctions are deeply gendered. Yet, they are not mere mimetic reproductions of the norms and rules imposed by religious and/or secular power: they rather negotiate gaps between conflicting (or even superseded) ideas within Post-Tridentine society. Such negotiations intertwine with and echo the debates in other prominent textual genres of the time: manuals of confession and philosophical and medical treatises referring to the Querelle des femmes (or better: Querelle des sexes).

This panel will investigate such negotiations of the specific gendered nature of vices in novels, novellas, comedias on the one hand and penitential and theoretical texts on the other. Differing approaches and incongruent perceptions of honor and self-esteem may help to detect the (re)shaping of subjectivity and the gender regimes of a society in change.

We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history to submit papers. Please send proposals via email with the subject line “Casuistry Dublin” to marlen.bidwell-steiner@univie.ac.at by 5 August 2020. The proposal should include a title (15 words max.); an abstract (200 words max.); and a short CV with full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Tags:  Casuistry  Hispanic Literature  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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The 'I' in the Margins: Poetry, Memoirs, Letters and Paratexts by Reformed exiles

Posted By Clara Marías, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 15, 2020

In the last decades, increasing attention has been paid to the works written or translated by Reformed exiles during the 16th and 17th centuries. From a European perspective, the monographies published by the members of the research group EMoDiR are a good example, and on the Spanish reformed exiles, scholars such as Carlos Gilly, Massimo Firpo, Ignacio García Pinilla, Doris Moreno, James Amelang, or Rady Roldán-Figueroa have edited and studied several works, expanding our knowledge about them. However, these translations and original writings from Juan de Valdés, Francisco de Enzina, Juan Pérez de Pineda, Casiodoro de Reina, Antonio del Corro, Tomás Carrascón, Nicolás y Sacharles, among others, have been studied from the perspective of History or History of Religion, rather than as literary works and often without a focus on their self-fashioning perspective and the ideological and political intentions of the authors.

For this reason, this panel invites proposals from scholars interested in analyzing the poetry, memoirs, letters and paratexts (introductions, dedicatory epistles, etc.) from Reformed exiles, dealing with the manners in which the authors, far from their countries and often persecuted and in danger, living “in the margins”, presented their lives and ideas and their faith and conversion by means of various rhetorical strategies, including dissimulation, persuasion, fictionalization or confrontation.

The proposals should study works by reformed exiles from any European country with a Catholic majority during the Early Modern period, with a literary approach to the poetry, memoirs, letters, prologues and dedicatory epistles selected for discussion.

Interested participants should send the following in a single document to Clara Marías (cmarias@us.es) by August 7, 2020:

  • Paper title
  • A single page CV
  • Abstract (about 500 words)

Tags:  Cultural Networks  Diaries  emotional history  European history  European literature  exile  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italy  Literature  memoirs  Memory Studies  Networks  Philosophy  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Rhetoric  self-fashioning  Spanish literature  translation 

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Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

Posted By Alice Brooke, Friday, July 10, 2020

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

The politics of the early modern Atlantic World are inseparable from religion. Indeed, the role of Western Christianity, both Protestant and Catholic, in nation formation and colonial expansion across the Spanish, Portuguese, English, and French-speaking worlds is indisputable. In recent decades, however, increasing attention has been paid to the multi-faceted ways in which religious literary texts were used both to uphold and to question the political status quo. In particular, scholars have highlighted the importance of non-Christian religious voices in changing our understanding of the role of literary creation as a source of resistance to dominant political narratives. This panel invites proposals that explore in new ways this relationship between religious faith and literary creation throughout the Atlantic World. In what ways was religious literature used both to affirm and to resist imperial narratives? What impact did these texts have on wider discourses of nationalism, imperialism, and expansion? How did the lives of Jews, Muslims, and other religious minorities intersect with colonialist aims? How does a deeper understanding of the presence of non-Christian voices change how we understand the relationship between religion and politics in this period? What impact do these discourses continue to have on the place of religious communities in these regions in the present day?

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alice.brooke@merton.ox.ac.uk or imogen.choi@exeter.ox.ac.uk by August 7 2020:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract
  • A single page CV

Tags:  Americas  British Empire  Comparative Literature  English Literature  eurocentrism  French Empire  French Literature  Geographies  Global Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Missions  networks  Portuguese Empire  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  theology 

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Information and Loyalty Networks: Local Mediators in the Global Construction of Empires (16th century)

Posted By Ida Mauro, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

Session organized by Ida Mauro and Diego Sola, University of Barcelona.

Research group REDIF. Redes de información y fidelidad: los mediadores territoriales en la construcción global de la Monarquía de España (1500-1700).

The aim of this session is to attract papers to reflect on complex political systems (CPS) in the Early Modern Age, which were dominated by the convergence of multiple interests, and their need to gather information about their subjects from different sources. As a rule, local actors played an essential role in achieving the system’s political aims of integration and governance. The global expansion of the Spanish and Portuguese monarchies and of the Ottoman Empire in the 16th century, in which different institutions, social and economic practices, and political and religious traditions converged, demanded communication and information mechanisms to convey the necessary knowledge about both territories and people.

These local, political or religious, ‘agents’ were a sort of “transmission belt” between the court and its European, American, African and Asian territories; they defended local interests while delivering information about distant political and cultural contexts. They complemented the action of other political actors (such as viceroys, governors and superior councils) and provided a more direct means of communication between the subjects and the king. These local actors include a wide array of intellectuals, such as the humanist Mariangelo Accursio or the writer Giovan Battista Pino, who defended their cities’ interests at Charles V’s court; religious reformers, such as Diego de Salazar and José de Acosta, who connected distant territories in Asia, America and Europe with their ecclesiastical work during the reign of Philip II; or the missionaries Andrés de Urdaneta and Martín de Loyola, who connected peoples and experiences both within and outside the empire’s borders, also in the 16th century.

We welcome papers on local agents, both individuals and groups (secular or religious), which were active within the same territory, their role, networks, religious identity, production of texts and accounts. The aim of this session is to re-create the human and information-related dimension of a universe of local agents that constantly moved back and forth between their territories and decision-making centres.

Their essential role provides a new insight into Early Modern governance, which was based on the strategic action of territorial mediators, as well as to present Early Modern empires as a laboratory of knowledge in which the operation of territorial mediators played an essential role in the governance of different contexts and interests.

Please send proposals, including a 150-word abstract with your paper title, full name, current affiliation, and a short CV (up to 5 pages) by July 31th, 2020 to Dr. Ida Mauro idamauro@ub.edu and Dr. Diego Sola diegosola@ub.edu

For further information see the Renaissance Society of America meeting website: www.rsa.org/page/RSADublin2021

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Americas  China  Diaries  European history  Hispanic Literature  Jesuits  Missions  Nobility  Portuguese Literature  Religious Studies  Republic of Letters  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  the courtier  translational imaginaries  trasnational studies 

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The Burden of Blood in Early Modern Spain

Posted By Amy E. Sheeran, Thursday, June 25, 2020

Although blood, as a symbol, has always been replete with meanings, in the context of early modern Spain, it becomes uniquely potent. This panel seeks to consider blood as a category of representational analysis, following the lead of Gil Anidjar and Joan Scott. In particular, within the context of the ideology of blood purity with its attention to blood’s content, origin, and legibility, representations of blood are evocative and layered. Recent attention to the history of blood purity statutes and their influence, as well as to the role of blood in shaping national, imperial, and religious identity in Spain, prompts further analysis of blood’s discursive potential in the early modern Iberian world. In this panel, we aim to consider how representational works approach and articulate the multilayered meanings blood allows in this context. We welcome interdisciplinary submissions focused on literary, historical, or visual works that consider medical and scientific knowledge; blood and its relation to race; the role of blood in signaling or establishing class; theological questions and debates; blood as a nexus of gender and sexuality, and other related concerns.

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with a proposed title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief CV to Amy Sheeran at sheeran1@otterbein.edu and Rachel Burk at rburk@ndm.edu by August 1.

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Nobility  Religion  Spanish Empire  theology  Women and Gender 

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CfP: El Grupo de investigación Pensamiento y Tradición jesuita en la modernidad temprana (PEMOSJ)

Posted By Juan Antonio Senent-De Frutos, Thursday, June 18, 2020

El Grupo de investigación Pensamiento y Tradición jesuita en la modernidad temprana (PEMOSJ), en calidad de grupo de investigación integrado (Associate Organization) en The Renaissance Society of America, le ofrece participar en el próximo Annual Meeting de esta sociedad científica, que se celebrará en Dublín del 7 al 10 de abril de 2021.

En el apartado secciones puede enviar su resúmen hasta el próximo 31 de julio seleccionando la sección en la que desea participar. Puede utilizar el siguiente formato descargable a través de este enlace.

Una vez aceptados los resumenes el próximo 10 de septiembre se abrirá el plazo para enviar las comunicaciones completas hasta el 1 de febrero de 2021.

Antes de la celebración de las jornadas en Dublín, los respectivos artículos serán difundidos entre los participantes de la sección. Todos los artículos recibidos serán evaluados por pares. A la luz de la evaluación, se realizará una selección de artículos en orden a su publicación posterior. Antes del 30 de abril los organizadores se pondrán en contacto con los autores seleccionados para su publicación en Journal of Jesuit Studies; o en la colección Jesuit Studies book series, ambas dirigida por Robert A. Maryks en editorial Brill.

Idiomas para las secciones/paneles: Las propuestas, y los textos completos, pueden ser remitidos y defendidos en los siguientes idiomas: castellano o inglés.

En función del destino de su posible publicación, el texto revisado podrá ser requerido en la lengua admitida en la publicación final, y con los estándares lingüísticos y científicos requeridos por la edición correspondiente.

Comité científico:

Juan Antonio Senent-De Frutos (Director Archivo Francisco Suárez, Universidad Loyola Andalucía), Robert A. Maryks (Editor-in-Chief Journal of Jesuit Studies y Jesuit Studies book series, Brill), Pedro Calafate (Universidad de Lisboa), Capucine Boidin (Directrice Professeure à la Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3 – IHEAL), Alfredo Culleton (PPG Filosofia Unisinos), Jacob Schmutz (Filosofía e Historia, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris 4), Giannina Burlando (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile), Pilar Pena Búa (Universidad Loyola), Eduardo Ibáñez (Universidad Loyola), Pablo Font-Oporto (Universidad Loyola), Wenceslao Soto (Archivum Historicum Societatis Iesu, Roma).

Tags:  Americas  Francisco Suárez  Hispanic Literature  History  Jesuits  Neo-Latin Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  SJ 

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Althusser's Renaissance

Posted By Martin Moraw, Saturday, June 13, 2020

Louis Althusser’s thought is receiving renewed attention in the humanities and social sciences. This session seeks to bring together scholars of various disciplines and specializations to explore the potential of a return to Althusser in the particular context of Renaissance/early modern studies. Contributions may reflect on Althusser’s writings on early modern figures, make use of Althusserian concepts to produce new readings of early modern texts, or engage relevant theoretical questions.

Topics may include: Althusser, Machiavelli, politics; Althusser, Galileo, science; Althusser, Spinoza, philosophy; structure, conjuncture, contradiction, overdetermination, uneven development; Althusser and theater; symptomatic reading; ideology, subjectivation; aleatory materialism, the encounter.

Please send proposals including a paper title, an abstract (200 words), and a one-paragraph CV to Martin Moraw (martin.moraw@aucegypt.edu) by July 31, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy 

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Patronage and innovation: how patronage shaped textual culture in the early modern world

Posted By Annet den Haan, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Studying patronage is crucial for understanding the early modern world. Indeed, recent scholarship on patronage covers the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, it studies countries as diverse as Italy and the Dutch Republic, and it focuses on artifacts ranging from scientific theses to funerary poems, from paintings to coins. Although scholars of patronage occasionally cross borders between countries, genres, or time periods, we believe we can bring scholarship a step further by comparing contexts systematically to uncover underlying mechanisms. In this panel, we focus on textual patronage, by which we mean patronage of clients (authors, editors, printers) who produce texts of any kind.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how textual patronage relates to the client’s intellectual and artistic freedom, and hence to originality and innovation. In which cases are authors free to create something new? Does economic or social success lead to more autonomy? Is patronage a stimulus for innovation, or does it prevent authors from being innovative? In other words, is patronage limiting or liberating? The question of what causes innovation is one of the points of focus within the interdisciplinary field of the history of knowledge, and several tentative explanations have been suggested. By focusing on patronage relations, we add another perspective to this debate.

Our aim is to compare case studies of patronage across regions, periods, communities, ideologies, and genres, in order to draw tentative conclusions about patronage in relation to intellectual and artistic freedom. We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. We intend to make the panel a collaborative effort and would like to discuss in advance with all presenters which specific questions we will all answer, in order to systematically study the mechanisms of innovation in textual products of patronage.

Submission guidelines

Interested participants are invited to submit the following:

  • a 400-word abstract as well as a 150-word short version
  • a curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address; max. 5 pages
  • paper keywords.

Please send all materials to Annet den Haan (a.denhaan@uu.nl) and to Nina Geerdink (n.geerdink@uu.nl). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America. Please not that RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Music  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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The Renaissance Cicero

Posted By Marijke Crab, Friday, June 5, 2020

Call for Papers: The Renaissance Cicero

 

The Renaissance Society of America, Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

 

Submission Deadline: 20 July 2020

 

Although it might be exaggerated to state that the Renaissance was vor allen Dingen eine Wiederbelebung Ciceros, und erst nach ihm und dank ihm des übrigen klassischen Altertums” (T. Zielinski), it is certainly impossible to overestimate Cicero’s cultural importance in the early modern period. All humanists were avid readers of both his speeches and his treatises on philosophy, rhetoric, and law; moreover, they regarded him as a political role model, admired his literary genius and were, even to a fault, enthusiastic imitators of his style.

 

Since Cicero’s afterlife is one of the most varied and wide-ranging of any classical author, this session proposes to study his Renaissance reception in the broadest sense possible. To this end, proposals from all disciplines are encouraged. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the study of:

  • early modern editions, translations, commentaries, florilegia, etc. of Cicero’s works;
  • early modern biographies of Cicero (vitae Ciceronis);
  • intertextuality with Cicero’s works in early modern literature, either in Latin or in the vernacular;
  • early modern appreciations, or criticism, of Cicero as a writer, philosopher, statesman, or historical person;
  • Cicero as a literary and stylistic model, the debate on Ciceronianism, and his importance for early modern rhetoric and epistolography.

Interested participants are invited to send a 150-word abstract and short CV to Marijke Crab (marijke.crab@kuleuven.be) by 20 July 2020. Please follow the submission guidelines set out at https://www.rsa.org/page/AnnualMeetingSubmissionsGuide.

Tags:  Book History  Classical Tradition  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  Humanism  Italian Literature  Neo-Latin Literature  Rhetoric 

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