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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Renaissance Dialogue between Visual Art and Humanism

Posted By Anne H. Muraoka, Thursday, July 23, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 29, 2020

  The sweeping relevance of Leon Battista Alberti’s De pictura is that the treatise joins the two most conspicuous cultural developments of the early Renaissance, namely, humanism and visual art. With this avant-garde fusion, Alberti elevated the status of painting to parity of esteem with the liberal arts, thus transforming the standard of artisan into the archetype of artist — executor of personal vision — and essentially initiating the discipline of art criticism with the first ‘how-to’ book of the modern era. A persistent polemic, however, surrounds the influence of classical literature upon early Renaissance aesthetics. The primary debate regards the extent of mutual influence between humanism and the visual arts. Recent scholarship aims to correct the common notion that the two disciplines were intertwined during the early Quattrocento. Cennino Cennini’s instructional manual Il libro dell’arte, of the late 1300s, and Lorenzo Ghiberti’s Commentarii of 1450, are the other major surviving discourse on visual arts of the early Renaissance. However, these are not humanist texts. The absence of surviving humanist discourse, however, does not invalidate a possible bilateral influence of antique aesthetics that would further mutual awareness in humanists and artists. Art may have affected early humanists through aspects of antiquity’s visual history. On the other hand, humanists may have influenced the discussion of art and architecture. Accordingly, if antique art and its post-antique imitation impacted early humanist thinking — or vice versa — art and text would begin to interchange values, and the resulting conjunction would inform painting. This panel examines how the two disciplines — humanism and the visual arts — may have specifically intersected in the early Renaissance, bringing art and intellectual history into a more specific dialogue. 

Paper proposals must include the following: full name, current affiliation and e-mail address; PhD completion date (past or expected); brief CV (2-page maximum); paper title (15-word maximum); and abstract (150-word maximum).

Please submit proposals to Peter Weller (oplontis@gmail.com) and Anne H. Muraoka (amuraoka@odu.edu) by 12 August 2020.

           

             

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Classical Tradition  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art 

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CfP: Andrea Cesalpino (1519–1603), a Physician, Philosopher, and Botanist in Renaissance Italy

Posted By RSA, Monday, July 20, 2020

As his activities intersect, and innovatively shape various fields, Andrea Cesalpino was a key figure in Renaissance culture. Alongside with his work as a professor of botany and medicine at the University of Pisa, where he directed the botanical garden, and as a professor of medicine in Rome and a personal physician to Pope Clemente VIII, Cesalpino’s writings testify to a largely innovative approach to natural philosophy.

For example, his philosophical work, Quaestionum peripateticarum libri V (1569) provides an Aristotelian perspective with traces of Averroes. In his medical texts, Cesalpino reveals important insights in the aspects of blood circulation. In De plantis libri XVI (1583), he crucially frames botanical studies within an Aristotelian architecture, laying down the foundation of plant morphology and physiology of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Yet, he also focused on magic in Daemonum investigation (1580) and metallurgy in De metallis (1596).

While these texts are well-known by specialists, a more complete investigation of Cesalpino as a whole is missing in recent scholarship. In this panel, we aim to explore Cesalpino’s work in detail, unearthing the importance of his studies in different fields and discussing Cesalpino as a major figure in Renaissance knowledge. While the inspection of Cesalpino’s work per se lags behind, and thus the aim of this panel is to fill a gap in scholarship, investigating the debates over Cesalpino’s in the sixteenth century and the reception and presence of Cesalpino in the early modern time suits the scope of the panel.

Proposals for the panel should be sent to fabrizio.baldassarri@gmail.com by the end of July 2020 and should contain a 15-word title, an abstract of 150-word maximum (word count is mandatory!), max 5 page cv, PhD or other terminal degree completion date (past or expected), and full name, affiliation, email address.

The panel is sponsored by the RSA Discipline Representative for Medicine and Science.

Tags:  Humanism  Medicine and Science  Philosophy 

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The 'I' in the Margins: Poetry, Memoirs, Letters and Paratexts by Reformed exiles

Posted By Clara Marías, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 15, 2020

In the last decades, increasing attention has been paid to the works written or translated by Reformed exiles during the 16th and 17th centuries. From a European perspective, the monographies published by the members of the research group EMoDiR are a good example, and on the Spanish reformed exiles, scholars such as Carlos Gilly, Massimo Firpo, Ignacio García Pinilla, Doris Moreno, James Amelang, or Rady Roldán-Figueroa have edited and studied several works, expanding our knowledge about them. However, these translations and original writings from Juan de Valdés, Francisco de Enzina, Juan Pérez de Pineda, Casiodoro de Reina, Antonio del Corro, Tomás Carrascón, Nicolás y Sacharles, among others, have been studied from the perspective of History or History of Religion, rather than as literary works and often without a focus on their self-fashioning perspective and the ideological and political intentions of the authors.

For this reason, this panel invites proposals from scholars interested in analyzing the poetry, memoirs, letters and paratexts (introductions, dedicatory epistles, etc.) from Reformed exiles, dealing with the manners in which the authors, far from their countries and often persecuted and in danger, living “in the margins”, presented their lives and ideas and their faith and conversion by means of various rhetorical strategies, including dissimulation, persuasion, fictionalization or confrontation.

The proposals should study works by reformed exiles from any European country with a Catholic majority during the Early Modern period, with a literary approach to the poetry, memoirs, letters, prologues and dedicatory epistles selected for discussion.

Interested participants should send the following in a single document to Clara Marías (cmarias@us.es) by August 7, 2020:

  • Paper title
  • A single page CV
  • Abstract (about 500 words)

Tags:  Cultural Networks  Diaries  emotional history  European history  European literature  exile  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italy  Literature  memoirs  Memory Studies  Networks  Philosophy  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Rhetoric  self-fashioning  Spanish literature  translation 

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Ways of Knowing: Re-evaluating Artistic Education in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Caroline E. Paganussi, Tuesday, July 14, 2020

The establishment of observation and experimentation as essential modes of knowledge formation in early modern Italy has been well-established in recent scholarship. Artists participated in this paradigm shift, using contemporary rhetorical strategies to forcefully and eloquently assert the nobility of their profession. Often without the benefit of advanced education, they drew on discourses such as the disputa delle arti to prove their intellectual credentials and, by extension, their proximity to the studia humanitatis. This last observation invites us to reevaluate the issue of artistic education. What did artists know in early modern Italy? How did they come to know it outside of traditional academic settings? What communities and interactions informed their practice? And how did less traditional modes of knowledge formation inform the cultivation of artistic identity?

We invite proposals that explore early modern artists and the acquisition and dissemination of rhetorical, philosophical, and theological knowledge. Topics may include (but are not limited to): the acquisition of religious, historical, poetic, and philosophical concepts expressed in artworks; repetition or re-use of knowledge in multiple projects; methods of knowledge transmission within the workshop, the confraternity, or court; and networks of learning.

Please send paper titles, abstracts (150 words), 3-5 keywords, and a curriculum vitae (max. 2 pages) to both Lindsay Dupertuis (ldupertu@umd.edu) and Caroline Paganussi (cpaganus@umd.edu) by August 1.

Tags:  Art History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italian Renaissance Art  Networks  Rhetoric  Visual Studies 

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Theatres of Knowledge: On the Theatricalisation of Scientific Practices

Posted By Oscar Seip, Tuesday, July 7, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

Studying the intertwined history of the theatre and the sciences is crucial to understand the development of different styles and strategies that developed during the Early Modern Period for the discovery and presentation of knowledge. Indeed, previous scholarship has studied the importance of the locality of the theatre to understand how scientific practitioners acquired and disseminated knowledge. While this has focused on the anatomy theatre, its impact beyond the field of medicine has received relatively little consideration. In this panel, we explore the anatomy theatre in relation to a broader vision of the world as a theatre.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how the anatomy theatre relates to a hypothesised radical shift towards the theatricalisation of scientific practices. Did it lead to a new genre of printed works? Was it a new tool and practice of observing the world? Were these observations recorded and transmitted in a new and unique way?  How is the theatre different from contemporary metaphors such as the mirror and the book of nature? How does the theatre relate to the concepts of performance and spectacle? In other words, is there a distinctly theatrical style and strategy for the discovery and presentation of knowledge?

Our aim is to compare case studies of the theatre’s use across different periods (from the Early Modern period to the Enlightenment), fields of science or subjects (e.g. geography, medicine, architecture, mathematics), and different kinds of knowledge (practical or theoretical) and the different styles and strategies that they employ to represent this knowledge (figural/pictorial or abstract and textual). Particular attention will be given in this to the translation from the (imaginative) mental and physical space of the theatre to the space of the page.

We invite speakers (including junior scholars) from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. Proposals for 20-minute papers (no more than 150 words), together with a short CV should be sent to seip@biblhertz.it by 31 July 2020. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with any questions.

 

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Digital Humanities  Dissection  English Literature  European literature  History  History of Medicine  History of Science  Humanism  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Renaissance  Visual Studies 

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Comparative Antiquarianism: Europe-China

Posted By Clare E. Guest, Friday, July 3, 2020

Comparative Antiquarianism: Europe-China

This session opens the question of comparative study of collecting practices and antiquarian scholarship in Europe and China, two civilizations which shared a veneration of antiquity. The session seeks to explore lines of similarity in such areas as epigraphy, the collecting and significant display of antiquities, the contexts of antiquarian activity, from court ceremonial to scholarly retreat or conspicuous consumption and the relationship with other humanistic disciplines concerned with the study of literature, history, ethics and ancient customs and religion.

These similarities are underpinned by profound differences in political thought, modelling of temporality and conceptions of form in European and Chinese civilisation. Exploration of the similarities in the light of the differences can illuminate preconceptions both in the systems of thought which shaped European classical antiquarianism and in our methods of studying it. In this way, we can enhance awareness of Humanist cultures beyond Europe without losing depth and detail.

Papers are invited in areas such as (for example) the early Jesuit missions in Asia, antiquities and religious practices, temporal modelling in antiquarianism, the contexts of antiquarian display and discussion, the role of international trade, the relationship between missionary work, pilgrimage and antiquarianism, the collecting of Chinese and East Asian artefacts in Early Modern Europe, the Humanist study of oriental languages and civilisations, Confucianism and Classical European Humanism.

Interested panellists should send an abstract (150 words) and CV to Clare Guest (celapraikg@gmail.com) by July 31, 2020.

Tags:  Antiquarianism  Art and Architecture  Asia  China  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Humanism 

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Women Worth Remembering: Female Models from Antiquity in the Visual Arts, c. 1350-c. 1650

Posted By Claudia Daniotti, Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

Antiquity has long offered a repository of exemplary models to look at, stories of notable figures whose lives and deeds provided examples of good or bad moral behaviour, and therefore guidance as to what emulate or avoid. This is particularly true in the late medieval to the Renaissance and early modern period, when attention was first drawn to Famous Women – rather than to Illustrious Men alone – and a flourishing visual tradition established around them, stemming from Boccaccio’s De mulieribus claris and Christine de Pizan’s Livre de la Cité des Dames. Figures as different as Penthesilea, Cleopatra, Lucretia, and Judith, among others, came to play particularly potent roles in European art from the mid-14th to the mid-17th century; their stories featured in a vast and varied corpus of paintings, manuscript and book illustrations, sculptures, tapestries, and a number of decorative objects in domestic interiors such as marriage chests and maiolica.

This panel seeks to explore the impact that these models from antiquity had on the developing notion of female identity between the late Middle Ages and the early modern period. It also aims to investigate more extensively the related iconographic tradition which, despite several recent scholarly publications and exhibitions, remains unevenly explored.

Proposals are invited to discuss examples of the visual reception of Famous Women in European art from c. 1350 to c. 1650, and to assess the kind of contribution these figures made to the formation of female identity in the period. While the panel focuses chiefly on figures from Greco-Roman myth and history, contributions on Famous Women from the Hebrew and Christian tradition (e.g., Biblical heroines and saints and martyrs) are also welcome. Paper topics might include but are not limited to: the visual tradition connected to collections of lives of women and educational treatises (e.g., Boccaccio, Christine de Pizan, Eustache Deschamps, Jacopo Filippo Foresti); case studies of medieval and Renaissance appropriations of Famous Women; the querelle des femmes; virtues and vices exemplified by representations of Famous Women.

Please submit proposals to Claudia Daniotti (Claudia.Daniotti@warwick.ac.uk) by 2 August 2020. They should include a paper title (max. 15 words), an abstract (max. 150 words), relevant keywords, a brief CV (max. one page, including your full name, affiliation, email address, and degree completion date, past or expected), and an indication of any audio/visual requirements you may have.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Classical Tradition  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Gardens and Academies in Early Modern Europe

Posted By Denis Ribouillault, Tuesday, June 30, 2020

The objective of this session or series of sessions is to explore the place and role of gardens in early modern academies. Although research on academies has expanded considerably in recent decades (Vagenheim et al., 2008), little has been written about the places where they met, including gardens, with the possible exception of the Bosco Parrasio in Rome (Grant, 2018). How did an academy choose its setting and why? How have literary and scientific activities and debates influenced the architectural, artistic and/or horticultural qualities of the chosen venue? In other words, can the iconography of gardens be linked to academic activities?  What role, for example, did the memory of Plato's Academy and Greek academies in general play in the development of early modern gardens (Ribouillault, 2018)? These questions demand that the garden be considered as a place of performance and require a multidisciplinary and intermedial approach. Articles on the use of gardens in scientific academies are particularly welcome.

Katrina Grant, «The Bosco Parrasio as a Site of Pleasure and of Sadness», Histoire culturelle de l'Europe 3 (2018) ; URL : http://www.unicaen.fr/mrsh/hce/index.php?id=1254

Denis Ribouillault, « Hortus academicus : les académies de la renaissance et le jardin », in Des jardins et des livres, Michael Jakob (ed.), Geneva: Mètis Press, 2018, p. 23-34 ; URL : http://hdl.handle.net/1866/23258

Ginette Vagenheim et al. (eds), Les Académies dans l’Europe humaniste. Idéaux et pratiques, Geneva: Droz, 2008.

Proposals of no more than 300 words with a title and a short bio (300 words max.) should be sent to ginette.vagenheim@univ-rouen.fr and denis.ribouillault@umontreal.ca before July, 31, 2020. Please indicate « RSA 2021 » in the subject line.

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Gardens  History of Science  History of Technology  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art  Literature  Renaissance Architecture  social history  Villa 

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Emblem Studies

Posted By Tamar Cholcman, Friday, June 26, 2020

Call for Papers

Discipline of Emblems
Renaissance Society of America 2021
Dublin
7–10 April 2021

The Discipline of Emblem Studies invites papers and panels for its sessions at the annual meeting (which may be on site or virtual). We may submit up to four panels. We invite papers and panels on any subject appropriate to our discipline and especially welcome those that address the following:

  • New perspectives on the origins of emblems
  • The whole is greater than the sum of its parts: Exceptions to the tripartite emblem
  • Emblems of the Unknown: Utopia and the New World
  • Emblems and the Republic of Letters
  • Emblems and Cosmology
  • New perspective on emblem books
  • Practice and theory of emblem digitization.
  • Jesuit emblems (in memory of G. Richard Dimler)

Panels must be organized by a current member of the Renaissance Society of America. Panels should ordinarily include no more than three presenters.

Please submit the following:

  • A session title no longer than 15 words;
  • 150 word abstract for description of the panel;
  • 150 word abstract for each of its papers;
  • 300 word curriculum vitae for each presenter, including full name, affiliation, and email address;
  • any audiovisual requirements;
  • session keywords.

Papers may be submitted by anyone. Graduate students should be doctoral candidates (post prelims).

Please submit the following in a single Word document:

  • 150 word abstract of the paper;
  • 300 word curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address;
  • any audiovisual requirements;
  • paper keywords.

Send all materials to Tamar Cholcman (cholcman@tauex.tau.ac.il). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America.

Please note: RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Art History  Book History  Cultural Networks  Digital Humanities  Discipline Representatives  Emblem  Emblems  Humanism  Jesuits  Literature  Neo-Latin Literature  Print  Visual Studies 

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“Otium cum dignitate”. Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

Posted By Cristina Agüero, Friday, June 19, 2020
Updated: Saturday, June 20, 2020

“Otium cum dignitate”.

Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

CFP | RSA Dublin 2021, April 7-10

 

 

The concept of “otium cum dignitate” –fruitful leisure in opposition to idleness– present in Cicero’s texts was restored by the Humanism and pervaded the noble culture from 15th to 17th centuries. “If you have a garden and a library” –wrote Cicero to his friend Varrone– “you have everything you need” (Epistulae ad Familiares IX, 4). The model of the Renaissance ville formulated by architects such as Sangallo and Palladio responded to this ideal by reflecting the principles of Vitruvio’s treatise De architectura. This revival of the antique forms implied the assumption of the ideals of decorum (adequation of the house to the social rank and public role of its proprietary) and magnificence as a sign of distinction. Consequently, the garden, the gallery and the library were core elements inside the dwellings of early modern patricians. These places not only played an essential function within the strategies of representation and construction of the family memory but also served as a scenario for the “conspicuous leisure” (as named by Veblen in The Theory of the Leisure Class) distinctive of the elites. Art collecting, gardening, and amateur writing, painting or drawing were common practices among early modern nobles and sovereigns, who found shelter from melancholy –the disease of the soul– in the rarities of the cabinets, the beauties of the galleries and the amenities of the gardens (teeming with fountains, sculptures, exotic plants, fruits and animals). They hosted intellectuals and artist to amuse themselves with the art of conversation, commenting poems or discussing the stories represented in the paintings they gathered. The theater performances, banquets and concerts celebrated by members of the political and ecclesiastical elites –often in honor of foreign visitors– evinced the performative and political dimensions of some forms of “otium”.

 

This panel aims to examine various aspects of the leisure events and activities cultivated by the early modern elites; considering their cultural, symbolical and political implications, the venues (ville, family palaces, libraries, galleries, banqueting houses, gardens, etc.) where they took place, and the artifacts and artistic creations (books, poems, plays, paintings, etc.) used or produced in these places. Studies on the cultural networks that thrive on the idea of “otium” (like the Accademia degli oziosi) and presentations concerning the concept of leisure and the criticism articulated thereon by moralists and arbitristas are also desirable.

 

We welcome proposals by researchers from every humanistic discipline –including history of art, history, philosophy and literature– at any career stage. Those interested in participating in this panel are requested to submit an abstract (no more than 300 words) and a short academic bio to cristina.aguero@ub.edu by July 31

 

*Please note that all speakers must become RSA members in order to present their papers at the conference.

 
Organizer: Cristina Agüero (Universidad de Barcelona).

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Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Cultural Networks  Galleries  Gardens  Humanism  Leisure  Libraries  Literature  Material Culture  Nobility  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Poetry  Sculpture  Villa 

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Looking to join a panel or roundtable

Posted By Thomas Q. Marabello, Thursday, June 18, 2020

Greetings!

I am a new RSA member interested in joining/contributing to a panel or workshop proposal at the 2021 conference. I'm a career switcher and former teacher of European history. I got my MA in Medieval and Early Modern European Studies from Georgetown University. My areas of research/interest include: Renaissance Italy, Habsburg Austria, English Reformation, Tudor England, The Jesuits, Catholic Reformation, Early Modern Europe. My master's thesis was on the roots of The English Reformation from the reigns of William I to Henry VIII. I'm happy to do research or help with a proposal in these areas. Thank you!

Tags:  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art  Jesuits  Religion  Religious Studies 

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Mining for the Earth-Based Sciences

Posted By Katie Jakobiec, Thursday, June 18, 2020

Organizers: Stefano Gulizia (PAN, Warsaw); Katie Jakobiec (University of Toronto)

This panel is sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS), University of Toronto, for the 67th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, to be held in Dublin, Ireland, on 7-10 April 2021. We warmly invite submissions and hope to select 3-4 papers for presentation according to the following outline.

Between 1450 and 1650, in the aftermath of a great technological change in metallurgy, a vast Central European space including centres such as Trento, Chemnitz, and Goslar specialized and clustered into new industrial hubs. In our historiography of the period, as well, mining has emerged as a nexus for studying the interface between natural history, physiology, and the processing of materials. Thanks to Anna Marie Roos’s The Salt of the Earth (Brill 2007) and Laboratories of Art, edited by Sven Dupré (Springer 2014), to name only a few contributions, we have a refined understanding of how this artisanal knowledge related to alchemy and philosophy. More recently, a special issue of Renaissance Studies (34.1: 2019) edited by Tina Asmussen and Pamela O. Long undertook the ambitious and impressive task of accounting for Berggeschrey, or ‘mountain uproar’ in all its technological, legal, textual, and symbolic features, including the core ambivalence of ethnographic collections up to the new histories of labor in a reunited Germany.

By design, our session assigns a premium on epistemic practices over the two major viewpoints adopted by historians, namely folklore and socio-economic development. Overall, we would like to see the Renaissance mine and its paperwork as a concrete example of Hans-Jörg Rheinberger’s laboratory, and how objects appear and disappear, or perhaps, move from being merely ordinary to epistemic. Another larger outlook of this project is environmental. Paracelsus already endowed subterranean things with an enduring, palingenetic power which was then developed within an experimental framework; both James Delbourgo and Philippa Hellawell argued for a substantial yet persuasive extension of the domain of mining to include seascapes and submarine knowledge.

Given all this, and without pretenses to limit the analysis only to these points, we propose that:

  • the morphing of sites of extraction into sites of connectivity is potentially problematic; likewise, it is difficult to constraint the sheer variety of actors and agencies at a mine into the concept of a “trading zone” in which not everyone was “trading” (e.g. some were ‘accounting for’, others ‘enslaved to’, and so on). Could we improve on our metaphorical usage? In this regard, Renée Raphael’s 2019 essay in RS offers a valuable model of how the current ‘practical’ view of the trading zone hides a heavy reliance on textual learning.
  • there is a relation between cartographic curiosity and mining that still awaits to be fully explored, and this means dealing with maps, sections, landscapes, and representations of specimens. For example, we couldn’t find any reference in English-speaking scholarship to the Delineatio Wielicensis of 1645, that is, the map of the massive salt mine of Wieliczka, outside Cracow, in the context of the Polish scientific book of the seventeenth-century. How do we assess mining with regard to visual representation in earth sciences histories? Could we profitably turn to the tradition of geodesy and its instruments? And does the cartographic imagination link mining to topography, territoriality, and the military arts?
  • as a corollary to the last point, and because of our typical reliance on tacit or vernacular learning within an interdisciplinary-oriented history of knowledge, issues of mobility and redeployment have completely overwhelmed the traditional framework of geology, seen as the birth of a “new” science. Yet, there is still a lot to be gained from the longue durée of fifteenth-century artisanal humanism, as Ivano Dal Prete has stressed. We simply suggest that we need better studies of how mining relates to epistemic images of “deep time;” and to remind ourselves that even rocks and fossils were aligned to anatomical exercises.
  • so far, almost the entirety of our case studies came from the German-speaking world, which, in point of fact, has become synonymous with research on Renaissance mining. There is, however, an untapped wealth of materials pertaining to Italy, the Czech Republic, Poland-Lithuania, and the colonial Iberian experience. How would the ensuing picture differ? And how did the historical actors consider these lesser-studied mining towns as a built environment? Did an enviro-technical site function more like a networked object?

The deadline is July 15, 2020; notification of acceptance will come within 15 days after that date. To apply please: 1) submit an abstract of no more than 250 words, describing your proposal, and a 150-word narrative CV, which would serve as a basis for introducing you; 2) explicitly confirm proof of, or plan to obtain, a RSA membership; and 3) send all this as a single attachment to both organizers, at sgulizia@gmail.com and katie.jakobiec@utoronto.ca

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Artillery  Classical Tradition  Humanism  Legal and Political Thought  Material Culture  Materiality  Medicine and Science  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture 

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Patronage and innovation: how patronage shaped textual culture in the early modern world

Posted By Annet den Haan, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Studying patronage is crucial for understanding the early modern world. Indeed, recent scholarship on patronage covers the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, it studies countries as diverse as Italy and the Dutch Republic, and it focuses on artifacts ranging from scientific theses to funerary poems, from paintings to coins. Although scholars of patronage occasionally cross borders between countries, genres, or time periods, we believe we can bring scholarship a step further by comparing contexts systematically to uncover underlying mechanisms. In this panel, we focus on textual patronage, by which we mean patronage of clients (authors, editors, printers) who produce texts of any kind.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how textual patronage relates to the client’s intellectual and artistic freedom, and hence to originality and innovation. In which cases are authors free to create something new? Does economic or social success lead to more autonomy? Is patronage a stimulus for innovation, or does it prevent authors from being innovative? In other words, is patronage limiting or liberating? The question of what causes innovation is one of the points of focus within the interdisciplinary field of the history of knowledge, and several tentative explanations have been suggested. By focusing on patronage relations, we add another perspective to this debate.

Our aim is to compare case studies of patronage across regions, periods, communities, ideologies, and genres, in order to draw tentative conclusions about patronage in relation to intellectual and artistic freedom. We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. We intend to make the panel a collaborative effort and would like to discuss in advance with all presenters which specific questions we will all answer, in order to systematically study the mechanisms of innovation in textual products of patronage.

Submission guidelines

Interested participants are invited to submit the following:

  • a 400-word abstract as well as a 150-word short version
  • a curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address; max. 5 pages
  • paper keywords.

Please send all materials to Annet den Haan (a.denhaan@uu.nl) and to Nina Geerdink (n.geerdink@uu.nl). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America. Please not that RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Music  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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The Renaissance Cicero

Posted By Marijke Crab, Friday, June 5, 2020

Call for Papers: The Renaissance Cicero

 

The Renaissance Society of America, Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

 

Submission Deadline: 20 July 2020

 

Although it might be exaggerated to state that the Renaissance was vor allen Dingen eine Wiederbelebung Ciceros, und erst nach ihm und dank ihm des übrigen klassischen Altertums” (T. Zielinski), it is certainly impossible to overestimate Cicero’s cultural importance in the early modern period. All humanists were avid readers of both his speeches and his treatises on philosophy, rhetoric, and law; moreover, they regarded him as a political role model, admired his literary genius and were, even to a fault, enthusiastic imitators of his style.

 

Since Cicero’s afterlife is one of the most varied and wide-ranging of any classical author, this session proposes to study his Renaissance reception in the broadest sense possible. To this end, proposals from all disciplines are encouraged. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the study of:

  • early modern editions, translations, commentaries, florilegia, etc. of Cicero’s works;
  • early modern biographies of Cicero (vitae Ciceronis);
  • intertextuality with Cicero’s works in early modern literature, either in Latin or in the vernacular;
  • early modern appreciations, or criticism, of Cicero as a writer, philosopher, statesman, or historical person;
  • Cicero as a literary and stylistic model, the debate on Ciceronianism, and his importance for early modern rhetoric and epistolography.

Interested participants are invited to send a 150-word abstract and short CV to Marijke Crab (marijke.crab@kuleuven.be) by 20 July 2020. Please follow the submission guidelines set out at https://www.rsa.org/page/AnnualMeetingSubmissionsGuide.

Tags:  Book History  Classical Tradition  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  Humanism  Italian Literature  Neo-Latin Literature  Rhetoric 

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