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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Seduction and Courtship Rituals in Renaissance Italy

Posted By Marlisa den Hartog, Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Temptation and seduction are somewhat gendered words. In the context of the premodern courtship ritual, the more passive temptation part, allowing oneself to be looked at, is mostly played by women, whereas the seduction part, actively doing something to seduce the other, such as following them around or serenading them, is mostly played by men.This is, however, not exclusively the case. Sometimes women use active seduction techniques such as sending letters and gifts (in Italian novella stories), or impressing the other with martial skill (in romance epics). Likewise, young men may sometimes be described as tempting others by means of their clothes and hairstyles (although this is mostly within a homosexual context).

The behavioral codes for love affairs appear to be gendered as well. The code of conduct for women prescribed them to resist their suitors for as long as they could, in order to test their lovers, turning sex into an instrument of power, but also in order to appear chaste and modest. Men on the other hand were advised that in order to be successful in love, they had to be persistent and resilient – eventually, their beloved would give in, and if all else failed they were allowed to use force. Gendered behavioral codes that may have given rise to what is now called a rape culture.

With this panel, I would like to invite fellow scholars to engage with this topic, and open mindedly discuss the gendered nature of seduction rituals in Renaissance Italy. Who took the initiative in these affairs? What type of techniques were women believed to use to “tempt” men, and what techniques did men use to “seduce” women? What behavioral codes existed for these rituals? Who took the initiative to have sex, and who was passive, and who was active during sex? And, finally, how much agency do we think men and women had in these affairs? Through these questions, this panel will engage with discussions on gender identity and agency, as well as issues of consent and the normalization of a rape culture.

The goal of this panel is to gather a diverse group of scholars working with different types of source material, including literary genres such as romance, theater plays, novella collections, treatises on love, pornography/erotica, but also visual sources, personal correspondence and legal documents. It would be interesting to reconstruct and compareassumptions about the “sexual nature” of men and women (and how they were likely to behave), with behavioral codes about how men and women should behave, and, if possible, with examples of how men and women actually behaved. Of course, “men” and “ women”should not be seen as universals here. Much rather, it might be valuable to look for diversity in men and women of different ages, social classes, ethnicity, and within homo- as well as heterosexual relationships.  

Please send paper proposals to Marlisa den Hartog (m.i.den.hartog@hum.leidenuniv.nl) by 10 August 2020. The submissions must include:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc, no longer than 5 pages);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Tags:  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Sexuality  Women and Gender 

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"Dante's Legacy in Renaissance Politics & Religion" (sponsored by Dante Society of America)

Posted By Aileen A. Feng, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 13, 2020

Organized by Erminia Ardissino (Università degli Studi di Torino), with Aileen A. Feng (University of Arizona; Dante Society of America's representative to RSA)

This panel intends to shed new, broader light on the use of Dante’s works in the religious turmoil of Renaissance Europe and the foundation of the early modern political world. While at the end of the fifteenth century in Florence the poet was wrongly believed to be the translator of seven penitential psalms and the author of a Credo, both of which were print successes running into several editions, his Comedy and political treatise De monarchia were later taken as examples of an anti-papal position, especially in the Reformed world and in heterodox circles. On the 700th anniversary of Dante's death, to be celebrated in 2021, this panel will explore the interpretation, editing, manipulation, and use of Dante’s writings in religious and/or political terms within the frame of European religious strife, when the poet’s ideas were used to support or attack various confessional identities. Moreover, we are interested in the use of his political works not only in religious controversies, but also in the process of founding a new political science as political autonomy from religion was sought.  In addition to papers focused on Italy, we particularly encourage projects dealing with the reception and interpretation of Dante outside of Italy, in other countries involved in religious reformation.

On or before 1 August 2020, please send the following documents/information to Erminia Ardissino (erminia.ardissino@unito.it) and Aileen A. Feng (aafeng@arizona.edu):

  • full name, current academic affiliation, and email address
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (5 pages, maximum)
  • A / V needs

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Religion  Religious Studies 

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Early modern Anglo-Italian encounters: reframing travel, transit and translation

Posted By Iolanda Plescia, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 13, 2020

Taking its cue from Guyda Armstrong’s recent call for a ‘spatial turn’ in early modern translation studies (Intralinea, 2019), this panel seeks to reframe issues of travel, transit and translation of people, texts, and cultural ideas between Italy, England and Ireland in the early modern period, conceived broadly to include the early years of the Royal Society (1476-1660). Ideas of space, place, geographical setting will be explored more fully in relation to the linguistic and cultural content of the texts and relationships under scrutiny.

In the hope of fostering interdisciplinary dialogue, the panel will welcome papers from a broad variety of scholarly viewpoints, including but not limited to linguistic, literary, cultural and historical studies. Panelists may explore travelling ideas, texts, individual translators, and are especially encouraged to reconstruct specific, and situated, networks within which Anglo-Italian translation and textual exchange were cultivated.

Please email a 300-word proposals and a short CV to the panel organisers, Dr. Jane Grogan (jane.grogan@ucd.ie) and Dr. Iolanda Plescia (iolanda.plescia@uniroma1.it) by August 12, 2020.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  England  English Literature  Geographies  History  Italian Literature  Literature  networks  Renaissance  translation  translational studies 

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Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater

Posted By Luca Zipoli, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, July 14, 2020

“Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater”

Organizer: Luca Zipoli (Scuola Normale Superiore), luca.zipoli@sns.it

Chair: Laura Benedetti (Georgetown University)

ABSTRACT: Torquato Tasso encountered an extraordinary fortune between the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 18th thanks to his epic masterpiece, La Gerusalemme liberata (Jerusalem delivered). During the Renaissance and then the Baroque era, the poem was read, appreciated, and commented upon, but it also enjoyed many forms of adaptations through a vast range of visual arts and media, from illustrated printed editions to operas, from paintings and frescoes to theatrical plays. This panel aims to investigate, through a multidisciplinary and trans-cultural approach, this multidimensional phenomenon by examining some of the newly discovered and most relevant case studies of the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata, from the Cinquecento up to c. 1700. The theoretical framework of this panel will be rooted in the up-to-date paradigms of the “adaptation studies” (e.g. Thomas Leitch et alii 2020, Linda Hutcheon 2013, Julie Sanders 2005), and we will seek to respond to some of these questions: which features made Tasso’s poem such a rich source for creative re-elaborations? What do the multifaceted appropriations of La Gerusalemme tell us about the Baroque aesthetics and the various cultures that inspired them? How can the studies on Tasso’s reception contribute to the general field of adaptation studies? The aim of this panel is to present scarcely known or neglected cases within the long tradition of adaptations from Tasso, while shedding a new light on more frequent themes through cutting-edge interpretations and a new theoretical benchmark.

This panel invites paper proposals which may include but are in no way limited to:

  • illustrated printed editions of La Gerusalemme liberata (e.g. the editions Castello 1590, 1604, and 1617, Ruffinelli 1607, and Tozzi 1628);
  • paintings, drawings, and artworks inspired by the epic poem (e.g. the cases of Annibale Carracci, Nicolas Poussin, and Antoon van Dyck);
  • theatrical, music, and operatic adaptations of Tasso’s masterpiece (e.g. the works by Giaches de Wert, Claudio Monteverdi, and Giulio Rospigliosi);

Please send paper proposals to Luca Zipoli (luca.zipoli@sns.it) by 10 August 2020. The submissions must include:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc, no longer than 5 pages);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Book History  Italian Literature  Music  Performing Arts and Theater  Print  Reception Theory  Tasso  Visual Studies 

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Lists in Early Modern Women’s Writing: Life and Literature *extended deadline*

Posted By Nikolina Hatton, Friday, July 10, 2020
Updated: Monday, August 3, 2020

Lists proliferate in texts written by women and texts written about women, from the typical enumeration of “women worthies” within the querelle des femmes tradition to the lists of possessions and household accounts found in early modern commonplace books. Within women’s writing itself, functional everyday lists and literary lists sometimes merge, such as in Isabella Whitney’s “The Maner of her Wyll”—a poetic description of and reflection on London in the form of a Last Will and Testament.  

This panel seeks to reflect on the forms and functions of the list within early modern women’s writings and everyday lives. Literary studies has seen a recent resurgence of interest in the list, as scholars have noted the list’s ability to bring together questions of functionality and literariness. Scholars have shown that, as a form that deceptively appears simpler than it really is, the list and examinations of it shed light on the evolution and manipulation of literary conventions and can further signal important discursive distinctions between texts that at first feel otherwise quite similar. Such a project intersects well with the study of women’s writing in the early modern period, not only because lists appear so often in investigations into women’s everyday lives, but also because the corpus of literature by women is generally marked by subtle but significant deviations within the genres deemed acceptable for women writers. In material culture studies as well, the list has been hailed as an affordance for accomplishing everyday tasks as well as a container that emphasizes metonymy and materiality over metaphorical meanings. This panel seeks to open up these questions by broadly investigating the use of the list within early modern women’s utilitarian and literary writings.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send your paper’s title (max 15 words), a short abstract (150 words), your CV, and institutional affiliation/contact details to Nikolina Hatton (n.hatton@lmu.de) by 10 August 2020. A longer abstract may also be included in addition.

Tags:  Book History  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Daily Life  Diaries  Ekphrasis  English Literature  fiction  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Global Literature  History  interdiscplinary  Italian Literature  Libraries  Material Culture  Material Studies  Materiality  Memory Studies  networks  poetry  Portuguese Literature  Print  Spanish literature  Women and Gender 

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Reframing the Paragone: New Approaches to a Comparative Method of Artistic Analysis

Posted By Stefano Colombo, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Scholars have dealt at great length with the notion of paragone from the early modern period onwards. In art criticism, paragone is a technical jargon generally used to refer to the similarity between two things (for example artistic media) through the act of comparison. Because it involves the analogy between one thing and another, paragone invokes a comparative meter through which artistic practice is judged or recognized. Significantly, art historians have often resorted to paragone to refer to the competition of the arts, most notably painting and sculpture or poetry and painting. Although this interpretation of paragone is not unsubstantiated, recent scholarship has clarified that the actual meaning of paragone is much broader (Dempsey 2009; van Gastel et al. 2014; Nygren 2017). Going beyond the quarrel over the nobility of the arts, paragone implies the dialogic mode of reasoning typical of a debate, where both sides of an argument are discussed by means of a disputation (Dempsey 2009). This interpretation, which traces its roots in classical rhetoric and was revived in the Renaissance, has reshaped the notion of paragone as the basis of formal academic debate which is fundamental to all the arts and sciences.

This panel invites to reflect on paragone as a comparative method of visual analysis in the early modern period (ca. 1300-1700). In what ways does the flexible meaning of paragone help us reconsider the sources that laid the foundations of paragone itself, such as Benedetto Varchi or Leonardo da Vinci? Is paragone a fabrication of historiography, or was it already in effect in the Renaissance? Especially welcomed are papers that address paragone during Mannerism and the Baroque period. This is the moment when paragone entered the artistic debate of accademie, the learned societies whose members were erudite of various disciplines encompassing the visual arts, literature, law and philosophy. How did paragone influence artistic discourse in the accademie? And how did the exchange of ideas among members of these accademie inform on the production and reception of different art forms?

Topics of interest might include but are not limited to: interaction among different media, in particular, sculpture, architecture and literature; ekphrasis and visual rhetoric; the extent to which artists (and their patrons) relied on technical, scientific or theological formulations and how these influenced the making and reception of artworks; or the analysis of the dialogic mode of paragone through the analogy between the liberal arts and other branches of knowledge, such as the natural sciences, medicine or theology.

Please send an abstract (150-word maximum), a paper title (15-word maximum), 3-5 keywords, academic affiliation, PhD completion date (past or expected), a brief curriculum vitae, and any audio/visual requirements to Stefano Colombo (stefano.colombo.365@gmail.com) by August 8, 2020.

Tags:  Accademie  Art and Architecture  Art Theory  Classical Tradition  Ekphrasis  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Literature  Paragone  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture  Rhetoric  Sculpture  Transmediality 

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Experiencing Death in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Ariana Ellis, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

Death saturates early modern Italian culture, from Dance of Death artwork and religious scripture to elaborate execution processions and the scaffold literature they inspired. But what did it mean to experience death? How did it look, sound, and feel? Where did the boundaries between life and death truly lie?

 

This panel is seeking papers that explore what it meant to experience death in Italy at any point during the early modern period. Analytical perspectives including: the senses, the emotions, philosophy, memorial culture, death culture, and art history are all welcome.

 

Please send proposals to the organizer (ariana.ellis@mail.utoronto.ca) by July 27th. Paper proposals must include:

 

·      Abstract (150 word maximum)

·      Paper title (15 word maximum)

·      Full name, current affiliation, and email address

·      CV (.pdf or .doc; 5 page maximum)

·      Date of PhD or terminal degree completion

       (past or expected)

 

Selected applicants will be notified as soon as possible. Please note- you must renew or activate an RSA membership to participate in the conference.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  death and gender  Death studies  Digital Humanities  emotional history  Florence  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  Memory Studies  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Sensory history  Sound studies  Urban Studies  Venice 

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Early Modern Privacy?

Posted By Mette B. Bruun, Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Organizer: Centre for Privacy Studies, University of Copenhagen (www.teol.ku.dk/privacy)

 

Privacy is hardly a hallmark of Early Modern life. Rooms are crammed; beds are shared; doors are open; letters are copied; gossip runs wild; church and state survey the movements and mores of their subjects. Nonetheless, thresholds and boundaries do exist – be they material or immaterial ­– and they delineate spaces with regulated access, thus creating spaces with a particular potential for solitude, intimacy or a life without civic obligations.

In this panel, we will explore the terminologies, characteristics and ambience that pertain to Early Modern spaces of privacy. Perhaps such spaces are associated with terms related to ‘privacy’ or ‘the private’, and then it becomes a question how to identify the historical meaning of such terms. Perhaps such spaces are associated with emotions, activities or statuses that we think of as private or related to privacy, and it becomes a question how to avoid anachronism when dealing with them.

This panel is dedicated to spaces of privacy that are admired in poetry, explored in fiction, defined in legislation, identified in architectural plans, qualified in devotional treatises, represented in artworks, moulded in sermons or indicated in political theory. We are interested in spaces of privacy as they are built, furnished, adorned, portrayed, used, imagined, cultivated, restricted, protected, accessed, feared or lauded in the Early Modern period, and we are looking forward to learning more about scholarly approaches that enable us to grasp the complexities and historical particularities of such spaces.

To apply:

Please upload an abstract (150 words), a CV (3-5 pp) and, if relevant, a request for a travel bursary via this formhttps://teol.ku.dk/privacy/join-us/call-for-publications/panel-for-the-renaissance-society-of-america-conference-in-dublin-2021/panel/

Deadline 10 August

 

If you have questions, please contact Mette Birkedal Bruun, Professor of Church History at the University of Copenhagen and director of the Centre for Privacy Studies: mbb@teol.ku.dk

The speakers whose proposal are accepted will be expected to engage in a dialogue to enhance the cohesion of the panel.

 

Please note: Speakers must become RSA members by 1 November

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Closet Drama  Daily Life  Diaries  English Literature  Gardens  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  piety  poetics  Renaissance Architecture  sexuality  social history  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Theatres of Knowledge: On the Theatricalisation of Scientific Practices

Posted By Oscar Seip, Tuesday, July 7, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

Studying the intertwined history of the theatre and the sciences is crucial to understand the development of different styles and strategies that developed during the Early Modern Period for the discovery and presentation of knowledge. Indeed, previous scholarship has studied the importance of the locality of the theatre to understand how scientific practitioners acquired and disseminated knowledge. While this has focused on the anatomy theatre, its impact beyond the field of medicine has received relatively little consideration. In this panel, we explore the anatomy theatre in relation to a broader vision of the world as a theatre.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how the anatomy theatre relates to a hypothesised radical shift towards the theatricalisation of scientific practices. Did it lead to a new genre of printed works? Was it a new tool and practice of observing the world? Were these observations recorded and transmitted in a new and unique way?  How is the theatre different from contemporary metaphors such as the mirror and the book of nature? How does the theatre relate to the concepts of performance and spectacle? In other words, is there a distinctly theatrical style and strategy for the discovery and presentation of knowledge?

Our aim is to compare case studies of the theatre’s use across different periods (from the Early Modern period to the Enlightenment), fields of science or subjects (e.g. geography, medicine, architecture, mathematics), and different kinds of knowledge (practical or theoretical) and the different styles and strategies that they employ to represent this knowledge (figural/pictorial or abstract and textual). Particular attention will be given in this to the translation from the (imaginative) mental and physical space of the theatre to the space of the page.

We invite speakers (including junior scholars) from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. Proposals for 20-minute papers (no more than 150 words), together with a short CV should be sent to seip@biblhertz.it by 31 July 2020. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with any questions.

 

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Digital Humanities  Dissection  English Literature  European literature  History  History of Medicine  History of Science  Humanism  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Renaissance  Visual Studies 

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The Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Courtier and the Formation of Modern Identity

Posted By Armando Maggi, Sunday, July 5, 2020
Updated: Sunday, July 5, 2020

The literature on the concept of 'courtier' in early-modern Europe is vast but also conventional. This session aims at revisiting this key concept by analyzing it diachronically, that is by bringing to the fore the essential elements that deviated from its hypothetical perfection. This session welcomes papers from French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish colleagues whose work may enlighten our understanding of the 'courtier' as a quintessential reflection of the dynamic reflection on the nature of self-understanding vis-à-vis its social, external challenges and interactions. Papers on classic authors such as Baltasar Gracián, Castiglione or Torquato Accetto are welcome, but contributions on much less familiar texts such as the Portuguese Corte na aldeia are especially welcome. Analyses of visual representations are welcome as well.

Interested panelists must send the following material: title, abstract (150 words) and updated C.V. to Prof. Armando Maggi (amaggi@uchicago.edu) no later than AUGUST 10.

Tags:  Art History  Baltasar Gracián  Baroque culture  Castiglione  French Literature  Italian literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Portuguese Literature  Spanish literature  the courtier  Torquato Accetto 

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Landscape and Italian Renaissance Books of Poetry

Posted By Jakub Koguciuk, Wednesday, July 1, 2020

This panel aims to bring a rarely considered set of material to the study of landscape : Renaissance books of poetry. The rise of independent landscape painting is a classic subject in the study of Renaissance art. The development of pictorial naturalism and single-point perspective, among others, led to vivid evocations of the visual world. In contrast, historians of the book such as Sachiko Kusukawa explore how books of the period engage with knowledge of nature in innovative ways. Italian poets of the period created new literary forms of conceptualizing nature: from experiments in the dolce stil novo to the revival of ancient pastoral. All of these forms of literature were presented to readers in the form of books.

This panel invites scholars working at the intersection of book history, literary studies and the history of art. Examples of “landscapes” featured in Renaissance books include but are not limited to full-page images such as frontispieces, designs in the margins, maps, city views, emblematic images and other figural representations of nature. We are also interested in how potential and imagined landscapes interact with the materiality of the book. Potential papers may focus on manuscripts as well as printed books within the long period of 1300 to 1600. We welcome all approaches to landscape, from studies rooted in the visual, the verbal and the codicological, as well as considerations rooted in environmental humanities and ecocriticism.

Interested participants should send a title, abstract of 250 words (with relevant images) and a CV to Zoe Langer, NEH Postdoctoral Fellow - The Digital Piranesi, Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of South Carolina (zlanger@mailbox.sc.edu) and Jakub Koguciuk (jakub.koguciuk@aya.yale.edu) by July 21st, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Comparative Literature  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  Visual Studies 

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Althusser's Renaissance

Posted By Martin Moraw, Saturday, June 13, 2020

Louis Althusser’s thought is receiving renewed attention in the humanities and social sciences. This session seeks to bring together scholars of various disciplines and specializations to explore the potential of a return to Althusser in the particular context of Renaissance/early modern studies. Contributions may reflect on Althusser’s writings on early modern figures, make use of Althusserian concepts to produce new readings of early modern texts, or engage relevant theoretical questions.

Topics may include: Althusser, Machiavelli, politics; Althusser, Galileo, science; Althusser, Spinoza, philosophy; structure, conjuncture, contradiction, overdetermination, uneven development; Althusser and theater; symptomatic reading; ideology, subjectivation; aleatory materialism, the encounter.

Please send proposals including a paper title, an abstract (200 words), and a one-paragraph CV to Martin Moraw (martin.moraw@aucegypt.edu) by July 31, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy 

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Magical Materials

Posted By Rebekah T. Compton, Wednesday, June 10, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Magical Materials

Dublin, Ireland, April 7-10, 2021

The theory of natural or astral magic is based on the belief that God emanates powers through the spheres of the planets and the fixed stars, down to earth, and into its matter. In Marsilio Ficino’s Three Books on Life and in the Picatrix, the word virtue—a term derived from the Latin word vis or power—is employed to describe the investment of celestial agency into terrestrial matter. This session seeks to examine the occult or secret virtues believed to be contained within materials and the use of these materials in image-based, natural, astral, and theurgic forms of magic.

A material's spiritual potency could be enhanced through the use of inscriptions, symbols, rituals, suffumigations, and/or prayers. Moreover, illicit materials—including human body parts and fluids— could be wielded for maleficent forms of sorcery. This panel invites papers addressing magical materials in the early modern period. Topics might include celestial likenesses and talismans; petitions for love, fertility, or childbirth; perfumes and pharmacology; ritual performances; representations of magical practices; sympathetic resonances and the soul's ascent; or the writings of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, Marsilio Ficino, the Picatrix, Hermes Trismegistus, or Iamblichus.

Please send a paper title, abstract (150 words max), a short CV, and A/V requirements to the session organizer Rebekah Compton at rebekahcompton@gmail.com. All presenters must register for the Annual Renaissance Society of America Meeting. The deadline for submission of materials to this panel is July 29, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  English Literature  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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Patronage and innovation: how patronage shaped textual culture in the early modern world

Posted By Annet den Haan, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Studying patronage is crucial for understanding the early modern world. Indeed, recent scholarship on patronage covers the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, it studies countries as diverse as Italy and the Dutch Republic, and it focuses on artifacts ranging from scientific theses to funerary poems, from paintings to coins. Although scholars of patronage occasionally cross borders between countries, genres, or time periods, we believe we can bring scholarship a step further by comparing contexts systematically to uncover underlying mechanisms. In this panel, we focus on textual patronage, by which we mean patronage of clients (authors, editors, printers) who produce texts of any kind.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how textual patronage relates to the client’s intellectual and artistic freedom, and hence to originality and innovation. In which cases are authors free to create something new? Does economic or social success lead to more autonomy? Is patronage a stimulus for innovation, or does it prevent authors from being innovative? In other words, is patronage limiting or liberating? The question of what causes innovation is one of the points of focus within the interdisciplinary field of the history of knowledge, and several tentative explanations have been suggested. By focusing on patronage relations, we add another perspective to this debate.

Our aim is to compare case studies of patronage across regions, periods, communities, ideologies, and genres, in order to draw tentative conclusions about patronage in relation to intellectual and artistic freedom. We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. We intend to make the panel a collaborative effort and would like to discuss in advance with all presenters which specific questions we will all answer, in order to systematically study the mechanisms of innovation in textual products of patronage.

Submission guidelines

Interested participants are invited to submit the following:

  • a 400-word abstract as well as a 150-word short version
  • a curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address; max. 5 pages
  • paper keywords.

Please send all materials to Annet den Haan (a.denhaan@uu.nl) and to Nina Geerdink (n.geerdink@uu.nl). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America. Please not that RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Music  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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Lexicographic Studies of Arts

Posted By Anna Sconza, Monday, June 8, 2020

The use of digital textual analysis tools has marked a profound renewal of studies on artistic lexicography in different languages, which has led to the creation and the putting online of numerous databases that have made available and usable wide sets of texts related to art. Digitization, indexing and marking simplify the search for occurrences in large corpora and make it possible to study translations, the treatment of literary motifs and the lexicological characteristics of texts, which are in this way made available to the scientific community.

This panel aims to bring together coordinators of digital projects - completed or in progress - around the lexicon and the scientific edition of texts of artistic or technical literature, with researchers who have adopted this terminological approach to analyze in an innovative way well known or unpublished texts, related to the production, the practice of the arts and interpretative theories derived from practice and which marked the history of taste. The papers will aim to provoke discussions about the method, contributions and perspectives of the lexicographic approach in the artistic field, in an interdisciplinary logic, in order to federate language historians, digital humanities specialists and art historians.

Please, send abstracts of 200 words and CV to Anna Sconza (anna.sconza@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr) and Margherita Quaglino(margherita.quaglino@unito.it) by July 15, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Digital Humanities  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art 

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