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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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The Early Modern Tacitus: Tacitism, literature and political thought

Posted By Jan H. Waszink, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, July 14, 2020

The Early Modern Tacitus: Tacitism, literature and political thought

Tacitism is the broad term for a range of secular and sceptical moral and political discourses in Europe from the mid-16th to the 18th century inspired by the works of the Roman historian Cornelius Tacitus. Usually understood in close (but not always straightforward) connection with the reception of Machiavelli's Principe, the early-modern reception of Tacitus contributed not a little to the rise and gradual acceptance of reason of state as a political discourse. Retrospectively, Tacitist ideas thus belong to the 'winning' ideas of history. For example Tacitist authors were among the first to advocate the separation of religion and politics. In its own time however Tacitism was a highly controversial mode of political discourse, as can be seen from the personal difficulties Tacitist authors in their lives or with the publication of their works. Also the complicated literary formats and rhetorical devices found in many Tacitist works testify to expected problems in the perception and acceptance of their content. Thus the history of Tacitism provides a fascinating basis to study the complicated interplay of political thought, rhetoric, and historical context.

In this panel we invite papers on such topics as:

  • The early modern reception of Tacitus, Thucydides, Polybius, and that of Machiavelli
  • Late humanist thought on politics, reason of state and history
  • political literature as a genre, or as an aspect of other genres (e.g. drama)
  • the changing relationship (or confrontation) between ethics, law, and religion, and 'reality' or 'politics'
  • changes and continuity in the application of history to literature in the 16th and 17th centuries
  • changes and continuity in the application of history to practical politics in the 16th and 17th centuries
  • the rise of political science as a separate discipline from the 17th century onwards
  • The secular nature (or not) of politics and history
  • The early history of secularisation and/or church-state relationships
  • Prudentia, justitia, reason of state, interest of state
  • Realism and natural law

If you want to participate in this panel, please contact the organiser before 7 August 2020, j.h.waszink [at] gmail.com.

Tags:  Classical Tradition  History  Legal and Political Thought  Tacitism  Tacitus 

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"Dante's Legacy in Renaissance Politics & Religion" (sponsored by Dante Society of America)

Posted By Aileen A. Feng, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 13, 2020

Organized by Erminia Ardissino (Università degli Studi di Torino), with Aileen A. Feng (University of Arizona; Dante Society of America's representative to RSA)

This panel intends to shed new, broader light on the use of Dante’s works in the religious turmoil of Renaissance Europe and the foundation of the early modern political world. While at the end of the fifteenth century in Florence the poet was wrongly believed to be the translator of seven penitential psalms and the author of a Credo, both of which were print successes running into several editions, his Comedy and political treatise De monarchia were later taken as examples of an anti-papal position, especially in the Reformed world and in heterodox circles. On the 700th anniversary of Dante's death, to be celebrated in 2021, this panel will explore the interpretation, editing, manipulation, and use of Dante’s writings in religious and/or political terms within the frame of European religious strife, when the poet’s ideas were used to support or attack various confessional identities. Moreover, we are interested in the use of his political works not only in religious controversies, but also in the process of founding a new political science as political autonomy from religion was sought.  In addition to papers focused on Italy, we particularly encourage projects dealing with the reception and interpretation of Dante outside of Italy, in other countries involved in religious reformation.

On or before 1 August 2020, please send the following documents/information to Erminia Ardissino (erminia.ardissino@unito.it) and Aileen A. Feng (aafeng@arizona.edu):

  • full name, current academic affiliation, and email address
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (5 pages, maximum)
  • A / V needs

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Religion  Religious Studies 

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Early Modern Privacy?

Posted By Mette B. Bruun, Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Organizer: Centre for Privacy Studies, University of Copenhagen (www.teol.ku.dk/privacy)

 

Privacy is hardly a hallmark of Early Modern life. Rooms are crammed; beds are shared; doors are open; letters are copied; gossip runs wild; church and state survey the movements and mores of their subjects. Nonetheless, thresholds and boundaries do exist – be they material or immaterial ­– and they delineate spaces with regulated access, thus creating spaces with a particular potential for solitude, intimacy or a life without civic obligations.

In this panel, we will explore the terminologies, characteristics and ambience that pertain to Early Modern spaces of privacy. Perhaps such spaces are associated with terms related to ‘privacy’ or ‘the private’, and then it becomes a question how to identify the historical meaning of such terms. Perhaps such spaces are associated with emotions, activities or statuses that we think of as private or related to privacy, and it becomes a question how to avoid anachronism when dealing with them.

This panel is dedicated to spaces of privacy that are admired in poetry, explored in fiction, defined in legislation, identified in architectural plans, qualified in devotional treatises, represented in artworks, moulded in sermons or indicated in political theory. We are interested in spaces of privacy as they are built, furnished, adorned, portrayed, used, imagined, cultivated, restricted, protected, accessed, feared or lauded in the Early Modern period, and we are looking forward to learning more about scholarly approaches that enable us to grasp the complexities and historical particularities of such spaces.

To apply:

Please upload an abstract (150 words), a CV (3-5 pp) and, if relevant, a request for a travel bursary via this formhttps://teol.ku.dk/privacy/join-us/call-for-publications/panel-for-the-renaissance-society-of-america-conference-in-dublin-2021/panel/

Deadline 10 August

 

If you have questions, please contact Mette Birkedal Bruun, Professor of Church History at the University of Copenhagen and director of the Centre for Privacy Studies: mbb@teol.ku.dk

The speakers whose proposal are accepted will be expected to engage in a dialogue to enhance the cohesion of the panel.

 

Please note: Speakers must become RSA members by 1 November

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Closet Drama  Daily Life  Diaries  English Literature  Gardens  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  piety  poetics  Renaissance Architecture  sexuality  social history  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Machiavelli and the Art of War

Posted By Alexander C. Lee, Monday, July 6, 2020

Published in Florence in 1521, the Arte della guerra is Machiavelli’s most detailed and comprehensive treatment of how states should organize themselves for war. Its impact is almost impossible to over-estimate. As Felix Gilbert memorably observed, it was the “foundation” upon which all subsequent military thought was based. Yet for many years, it was by far the least studied of Machiavelli’s major works. Regarded as little more than a technical appendix to his more overtly political writings, it was rarely mentioned – and almost never considered in its own right. Only recently has this begun to change. Thanks to a growing interest in the ‘Renaissance of war’, it has been (re-)translated into English by Christopher Lynch and is now the focus for some ground-breaking work by a new generation of scholars.

 

Marking the 500th anniversary of the Arte della guerra’s publication, this panel aims to reassess Machiavelli’s dialogue in light of recent research – and to explore new avenues for future study. Deliberately broad in focus, it seeks: (a) to provide new perspectives on the Arte della guerra, its Florentine context, and its place in Machiavelli’s life and thought; and (b) to re-consider its place in the development of Renaissance military theory, its originality, and its legacy.

 

This panel is being organised by Prof. Stephen Bowd (Edinburgh), whose recent book Renaissance Mass Murder: Civilians and Soldiers in the Italian Wars (Oxford, 2018) addresses the key question of the ‘Machiavellian Massacre’, and Dr. Alexander Lee (Warwick), whose biography of Machiavelli was published by Picador in March 2020. 

 

Proposals for 20-minute papers (no more than 150 words) – together with a CV (no more than 5 pages) – should be sent to machiavelliandtheartofwar@gmail.com by 27 July 2020. Applicants will be informed of the decision by 1 August 2020.

 

Contributions are invited to address themes including (but not limited to) the following:

  • Machiavelli’s relationship with classical and contemporary military theory
  • Machiavelli and the technology of war
  • The role of religion
  • The Arte della guerra and the Florentine militia
  • The politics of war
  • Civilians and soldiers
  • The place of the Arte della guerra within Machiavelli’s oeuvre
  • The textual reception of the Arte della guerra
  • The impact of the Arte della guerra on military theory and practice
  • Criticisms of Machiavelli’s military thought.

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  Book History  Classical Tradition  Florence  Italy  Legal and Political Thought  Machiavelli  Warfare 

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Call for Papers: “Global Conversion: Cultures, Religions, and Encounters”

Posted By Frank Lacopo, Wednesday, June 24, 2020

The early modern period is characterized by increasing human movement, exchange of cultural knowledge, and resulting encounters between previously isolated epistemologies, belief systems, and language families. As a result of reform, early modern communities identified new forms of difference and magnified existing ones, creating yet more opportunities for encounter with the “other.” Rather than simply accept and tolerate cultural, religious, and intellectual difference, early moderns more often sought to convert persons and ideas as they crossed lines of encounter. New definitions of confession, race, and humanity necessitated institutions, ideologies, and rituals to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and bodies across hardened lines that formed at loci of encounter. Knowledge, practices, and bodies had to be converted into acceptable and comprehensible forms as they crossed marked boundaries across the early modern world.

This Call for Papers seeks scholarly presentations on any aspect of intergroup encounter and the processes, rituals, and spaces of conversion that they necessitated in the early modern world. Paper topics might include but are not limited to:

  • Ideologies and rhetorics surrounding religious conversion
  • The intersection of religious conversion and subject-making
  • Loci of conversion (conversion houses, missions, etc.)
  • The conversion/translation of non-European knowledge into forms comprehensible to Europeans, and vice versa
  • The place of religious conversion and the conversion of persons to new political loyalty in diplomacy
  • The intersection of migration, itineracy, and conversion
  • The conversion of bodies and spaces for new uses and functions as a result of reform or colonialism
  • The limits of conversion and translation for achieving cross-cultural legibility and political loyalty
  • Persons and knowledge that resisted conversion and the question of “toleration”

Please send a short CV (limit to one page), a presentation title, and a 150-word abstract to the session organizer Frank Lacopo (fxl60@psu.edu OR frank.lacopo@psu.edu). In addition, please detail any A/V requirements that you expect to have.

All presenters must register for the 67th Annual Renaissance Society of America Meeting, be committed to attending the conference in Dublin, and make their own travel arrangements.

For more information about the RSA Annual Meeting, please see the conference website: https://www.rsa.org/page/RSADublin2021

The deadline for the submission of materials for this panel is August 10, 2020, to allow ample time for final panel submission on August 15.

Tags:  Americas  Education  History  Jesuits  Legal and Political Thought  Missions  Religion  Rhetoric  social history  theology 

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Sequestration and the City: Confinement, Exclusion, and Enclosure

Posted By Jessica A. Stevenson Stewart, Monday, June 22, 2020

Although cities are fundamentally sites of connectivity, the pandemic-induced isolation of 2020 has renewed our awareness of the strain and tension that seclusion brings, especially in densely urbanized areas. This session draws on our recent experiences of the Covid19 crisis and revisits the history of urban disconnection and disconnectedness. Rather than focusing strictly on epidemics, we want to take a broader view of seclusion and sequestration as marked forms of social exclusion. While scholarship in the wake of mobility studies has expanded our understanding of the global flow of people, goods, and ideas, it has often overlooked social and spatial barriers that constrained movement, particularly within cities. For even though urban centers functioned as networks, they also instituted and perpetuated division, separation, and exclusion.

This session explores the spatial and representational means by which certain persons and groups were separated from the urban life around them, either voluntarily or involuntarily. We ask how zones or sites of separation were established within the city, and how the immobility of some interacted with the mobility of others. Such spaces may have been constructed by and for an individual, by civic authorities, or by groups formed with the intent of exclusivity. The confinement in question may have been a form of punishment (e.g., the prisoner, heretic, or exile), a means of quarantine (e.g., the leper or plague victim), a welcome and self-imposed withdrawal, (e.g., the individual in a “closet” or study), or an ethical detachment, (e.g., religious retreat behind walls or within cloisters). We ask whether urban configurations hid the excluded and isolated, or if their presence was known and even advertised.

What architecture, rituals, and representations kept the excluded bodies present and acknowledged in the urban psyche? How did the exclusion of some mark civic identity for others? How did the interior and exterior architecture of particular buildings enforce social separation? What forms of material culture accompanied the separated individual and were those objects part of what marked the person as apart from normative civic culture? When were seclusion and sequestration valued? What historical philosophies informed early modern conceptualizations of exclusion, seclusion, isolation, and confinement? What contemporary theories provide frameworks for understanding the psychological, social, and geographical valences of these experiences?

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief curriculum vitae by August 1 to Elizabeth Honig at elizahonig@yahoo.com and Jessica Stewart at sinopia@gmail.com

Session Keywords: Urban History, Immobility, Exclusion

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  History  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Material Studies  Religious Studies  Urban Studies  Visual Studies 

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Mining for the Earth-Based Sciences

Posted By Katie Jakobiec, Thursday, June 18, 2020

Organizers: Stefano Gulizia (PAN, Warsaw); Katie Jakobiec (University of Toronto)

This panel is sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS), University of Toronto, for the 67th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, to be held in Dublin, Ireland, on 7-10 April 2021. We warmly invite submissions and hope to select 3-4 papers for presentation according to the following outline.

Between 1450 and 1650, in the aftermath of a great technological change in metallurgy, a vast Central European space including centres such as Trento, Chemnitz, and Goslar specialized and clustered into new industrial hubs. In our historiography of the period, as well, mining has emerged as a nexus for studying the interface between natural history, physiology, and the processing of materials. Thanks to Anna Marie Roos’s The Salt of the Earth (Brill 2007) and Laboratories of Art, edited by Sven Dupré (Springer 2014), to name only a few contributions, we have a refined understanding of how this artisanal knowledge related to alchemy and philosophy. More recently, a special issue of Renaissance Studies (34.1: 2019) edited by Tina Asmussen and Pamela O. Long undertook the ambitious and impressive task of accounting for Berggeschrey, or ‘mountain uproar’ in all its technological, legal, textual, and symbolic features, including the core ambivalence of ethnographic collections up to the new histories of labor in a reunited Germany.

By design, our session assigns a premium on epistemic practices over the two major viewpoints adopted by historians, namely folklore and socio-economic development. Overall, we would like to see the Renaissance mine and its paperwork as a concrete example of Hans-Jörg Rheinberger’s laboratory, and how objects appear and disappear, or perhaps, move from being merely ordinary to epistemic. Another larger outlook of this project is environmental. Paracelsus already endowed subterranean things with an enduring, palingenetic power which was then developed within an experimental framework; both James Delbourgo and Philippa Hellawell argued for a substantial yet persuasive extension of the domain of mining to include seascapes and submarine knowledge.

Given all this, and without pretenses to limit the analysis only to these points, we propose that:

  • the morphing of sites of extraction into sites of connectivity is potentially problematic; likewise, it is difficult to constraint the sheer variety of actors and agencies at a mine into the concept of a “trading zone” in which not everyone was “trading” (e.g. some were ‘accounting for’, others ‘enslaved to’, and so on). Could we improve on our metaphorical usage? In this regard, Renée Raphael’s 2019 essay in RS offers a valuable model of how the current ‘practical’ view of the trading zone hides a heavy reliance on textual learning.
  • there is a relation between cartographic curiosity and mining that still awaits to be fully explored, and this means dealing with maps, sections, landscapes, and representations of specimens. For example, we couldn’t find any reference in English-speaking scholarship to the Delineatio Wielicensis of 1645, that is, the map of the massive salt mine of Wieliczka, outside Cracow, in the context of the Polish scientific book of the seventeenth-century. How do we assess mining with regard to visual representation in earth sciences histories? Could we profitably turn to the tradition of geodesy and its instruments? And does the cartographic imagination link mining to topography, territoriality, and the military arts?
  • as a corollary to the last point, and because of our typical reliance on tacit or vernacular learning within an interdisciplinary-oriented history of knowledge, issues of mobility and redeployment have completely overwhelmed the traditional framework of geology, seen as the birth of a “new” science. Yet, there is still a lot to be gained from the longue durée of fifteenth-century artisanal humanism, as Ivano Dal Prete has stressed. We simply suggest that we need better studies of how mining relates to epistemic images of “deep time;” and to remind ourselves that even rocks and fossils were aligned to anatomical exercises.
  • so far, almost the entirety of our case studies came from the German-speaking world, which, in point of fact, has become synonymous with research on Renaissance mining. There is, however, an untapped wealth of materials pertaining to Italy, the Czech Republic, Poland-Lithuania, and the colonial Iberian experience. How would the ensuing picture differ? And how did the historical actors consider these lesser-studied mining towns as a built environment? Did an enviro-technical site function more like a networked object?

The deadline is July 15, 2020; notification of acceptance will come within 15 days after that date. To apply please: 1) submit an abstract of no more than 250 words, describing your proposal, and a 150-word narrative CV, which would serve as a basis for introducing you; 2) explicitly confirm proof of, or plan to obtain, a RSA membership; and 3) send all this as a single attachment to both organizers, at sgulizia@gmail.com and katie.jakobiec@utoronto.ca

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Artillery  Classical Tradition  Humanism  Legal and Political Thought  Material Culture  Materiality  Medicine and Science  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture 

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Continental Law and Early Modern Visual Culture

Posted By Hayley Cotter, Tuesday, June 16, 2020
Updated: Friday, June 19, 2020

This session aims to foster conversation about the relationship between Continental law (civil, canon, or Roman) and early modern visual culture. Chaired by Dr. Valérie Hayaert, it specifically probes how images of justice were adapted to conform to local custom in order to retain their effectiveness. However, any topic that addresses early modern European law and visual culture (including but not limited to painting, sculpture, book illustration, and public murals) is welcome and will be considered for inclusion on the panel.

Please send the following to Hayley Cotter (hcotter@umass.edu) by 15 July 2020:

  • Full name and current affiliation
  • Paper title (15-word max)
  • Paper abstract (150-word max)
  • Curriculum vitae (5-page max)
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)

Accepted panelists will be notified by 20 July 2020.

The panel is sponsored by the Kinney Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Comparative Literature  History  Legal and Political Thought  Visual Studies 

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Althusser's Renaissance

Posted By Martin Moraw, Saturday, June 13, 2020

Louis Althusser’s thought is receiving renewed attention in the humanities and social sciences. This session seeks to bring together scholars of various disciplines and specializations to explore the potential of a return to Althusser in the particular context of Renaissance/early modern studies. Contributions may reflect on Althusser’s writings on early modern figures, make use of Althusserian concepts to produce new readings of early modern texts, or engage relevant theoretical questions.

Topics may include: Althusser, Machiavelli, politics; Althusser, Galileo, science; Althusser, Spinoza, philosophy; structure, conjuncture, contradiction, overdetermination, uneven development; Althusser and theater; symptomatic reading; ideology, subjectivation; aleatory materialism, the encounter.

Please send proposals including a paper title, an abstract (200 words), and a one-paragraph CV to Martin Moraw (martin.moraw@aucegypt.edu) by July 31, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy 

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CfP: Sponsored Sessions, Discipline of Philosophy

Posted By Sara Miglietti, Monday, June 8, 2020

Call for Papers
Discipline of Philosophy

Renaissance Society of America 2021 Dublin
7–10 April 2021

The Discipline of Philosophy invites submissions for sessions at the next annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Dublin (which may be on site or virtual). Please send proposals for FULLY-FORMED panels or roundtables on any subject appropriate to our discipline. We especially welcome submissions on the following topics:

  • Debates over the disciplinary boundaries of philosophy and its relationship with other fields (e.g. medicine, rhetoric, theology), 14C–17C
  • Women in Renaissance philosophy (as authors, readers, patrons, translators, etc. or as a topic of philosophical discussion)
  • Encounters between European philosophy and non-Western forms of thought, 14C–17C
  • Teaching Renaissance philosophy in the 21st century

All sessions must be organized by a current member of the Renaissance Society of America. Please send the following materials to Sara Miglietti (sara.miglietti@sas.ac.uk) by 15 July:

Panel Proposal (min 2, max 4 speakers)

  • panel title (15-word maximum)
  • a 1-2 page description of the panel
  • any audio-visual requests
  • panel chair
  • respondent (optional for three-paper panels, required for panels with only two presenters)

Each paper presenter must provide:

  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • discipline area
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc, no longer than 5 pages)
  • PhD or other terminal degree completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

Roundtable Proposal (min. 4, max 8 discussants)

  • session title (15-word maximum)
  • a 1-2 page description of the roundtable
  • session abstract (150-word maximum)
  • discipline area
  • discussants (min. 4, max. 8)
  • any audio-visual requests
  • session chair
  • current email addresses for all participants

Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

Notes

  • No dual submissions please. RSA rules allow a participant to presentonly one paper. A dual submission could lead to the cancellation of an entire panel.
  • Sessions composed entirely of graduate students will not be considered, in keeping with RSA policy. Graduate students should be doctoral candidates within one or two years of defending their dissertations.

Tags:  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Rhetoric 

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