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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Milton, A General Session *extended deadline*

Posted By Eric B. Song, Thursday, July 23, 2020
Proposed papers may consider any aspect of the writings of John Milton; we especially welcome submissions from junior scholars.

Proposals should be sent to Eric Song, esong1@swarthmore.edu, by August 1 and include the following:

• full name, current affiliation, and email address

• paper title (15-word maximum), 

• abstract (150-word maximum), 

• curriculum vitae (no longer than 5 pages), 

• PhD or other terminal degree completion date (past or expected)

• if submitting a panel or roundtable proposal, a panel description (150-word maximum)


Tags:  English Literature  Literature  Religion 

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Figures of Polyglossia in British Early Modern Culture

Posted By Agnes Lafont, Monday, July 20, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

This panel, which is part of the “Translation and Polyglossia” project (https://tape1617.hypotheses.org/), wishes to explore ways in which polyglossia is inscribed textually as well as pictorially in early modern books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and other ephemera. It aims at investigating how common European knowledge was not only translated but adapted and naturalized in English book history. Emblems, woodcuts, engravings, broadsheets, dictionaries, and annotated or edited material in which several languages are co-present on the page may serve as examples. How was polyglossia made visible and marketed in early modern Britain? How did the figuration of polyglossia help transmit knowledge in a specific manner?

The study of the representation of polyglossia will interrogate:

  • The respective roles of various languages on the page
  • The different relationships to auctoritas that the use of a language other than English may induce (through the use of quotations, the reuse of engravings and woodcuts, etc.)
  • The functioning of a moving hermeneutics by an author (who imagines her or his text in various languages), by a reader (who annotates or makes comments in the margins)
  • The sociology of milieus who are conversant in several languages, have a shared erudition, use coded language, hieroglyphs...

Topics for consideration include:

  • annotated books and manuscripts
  • emblem books
  • polyglot dictionaries
  • polyglot documents produced by women
  • documents of performance
  • broadside ballads
  • pamphlets, periodicals, and ephemera

All types of documents may be brought to the discussion as long as they circulated in the British Isles in the early modern period, including books not printed in England but with attested circulations.

Please submit the following materials to organizers Agnès Lafont (agnes.lafont@univ-montp3.fr) and Laetitia Sansonetti (l.sansonetti@parisnanterre.fr) by August 7th to be considered for inclusion: paper title (15 words maximum); abstract (150 words maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300 words maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  Emblems  English Literature  European literature  Literature  Material Culture  Multilingualism  Print  translation 

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The 'I' in the Margins: Poetry, Memoirs, Letters and Paratexts by Reformed exiles

Posted By Clara Marías, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 15, 2020

In the last decades, increasing attention has been paid to the works written or translated by Reformed exiles during the 16th and 17th centuries. From a European perspective, the monographies published by the members of the research group EMoDiR are a good example, and on the Spanish reformed exiles, scholars such as Carlos Gilly, Massimo Firpo, Ignacio García Pinilla, Doris Moreno, James Amelang, or Rady Roldán-Figueroa have edited and studied several works, expanding our knowledge about them. However, these translations and original writings from Juan de Valdés, Francisco de Enzina, Juan Pérez de Pineda, Casiodoro de Reina, Antonio del Corro, Tomás Carrascón, Nicolás y Sacharles, among others, have been studied from the perspective of History or History of Religion, rather than as literary works and often without a focus on their self-fashioning perspective and the ideological and political intentions of the authors.

For this reason, this panel invites proposals from scholars interested in analyzing the poetry, memoirs, letters and paratexts (introductions, dedicatory epistles, etc.) from Reformed exiles, dealing with the manners in which the authors, far from their countries and often persecuted and in danger, living “in the margins”, presented their lives and ideas and their faith and conversion by means of various rhetorical strategies, including dissimulation, persuasion, fictionalization or confrontation.

The proposals should study works by reformed exiles from any European country with a Catholic majority during the Early Modern period, with a literary approach to the poetry, memoirs, letters, prologues and dedicatory epistles selected for discussion.

Interested participants should send the following in a single document to Clara Marías (cmarias@us.es) by August 7, 2020:

  • Paper title
  • A single page CV
  • Abstract (about 500 words)

Tags:  Cultural Networks  Diaries  emotional history  European history  European literature  exile  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italy  Literature  memoirs  Memory Studies  Networks  Philosophy  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Rhetoric  self-fashioning  Spanish literature  translation 

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Early modern Anglo-Italian encounters: reframing travel, transit and translation

Posted By Iolanda Plescia, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 13, 2020

Taking its cue from Guyda Armstrong’s recent call for a ‘spatial turn’ in early modern translation studies (Intralinea, 2019), this panel seeks to reframe issues of travel, transit and translation of people, texts, and cultural ideas between Italy, England and Ireland in the early modern period, conceived broadly to include the early years of the Royal Society (1476-1660). Ideas of space, place, geographical setting will be explored more fully in relation to the linguistic and cultural content of the texts and relationships under scrutiny.

In the hope of fostering interdisciplinary dialogue, the panel will welcome papers from a broad variety of scholarly viewpoints, including but not limited to linguistic, literary, cultural and historical studies. Panelists may explore travelling ideas, texts, individual translators, and are especially encouraged to reconstruct specific, and situated, networks within which Anglo-Italian translation and textual exchange were cultivated.

Please email a 300-word proposals and a short CV to the panel organisers, Dr. Jane Grogan (jane.grogan@ucd.ie) and Dr. Iolanda Plescia (iolanda.plescia@uniroma1.it) by August 12, 2020.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  England  English Literature  Geographies  History  Italian Literature  Literature  networks  Renaissance  translation  translational studies 

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Reframing the Paragone: New Approaches to a Comparative Method of Artistic Analysis

Posted By Stefano Colombo, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Scholars have dealt at great length with the notion of paragone from the early modern period onwards. In art criticism, paragone is a technical jargon generally used to refer to the similarity between two things (for example artistic media) through the act of comparison. Because it involves the analogy between one thing and another, paragone invokes a comparative meter through which artistic practice is judged or recognized. Significantly, art historians have often resorted to paragone to refer to the competition of the arts, most notably painting and sculpture or poetry and painting. Although this interpretation of paragone is not unsubstantiated, recent scholarship has clarified that the actual meaning of paragone is much broader (Dempsey 2009; van Gastel et al. 2014; Nygren 2017). Going beyond the quarrel over the nobility of the arts, paragone implies the dialogic mode of reasoning typical of a debate, where both sides of an argument are discussed by means of a disputation (Dempsey 2009). This interpretation, which traces its roots in classical rhetoric and was revived in the Renaissance, has reshaped the notion of paragone as the basis of formal academic debate which is fundamental to all the arts and sciences.

This panel invites to reflect on paragone as a comparative method of visual analysis in the early modern period (ca. 1300-1700). In what ways does the flexible meaning of paragone help us reconsider the sources that laid the foundations of paragone itself, such as Benedetto Varchi or Leonardo da Vinci? Is paragone a fabrication of historiography, or was it already in effect in the Renaissance? Especially welcomed are papers that address paragone during Mannerism and the Baroque period. This is the moment when paragone entered the artistic debate of accademie, the learned societies whose members were erudite of various disciplines encompassing the visual arts, literature, law and philosophy. How did paragone influence artistic discourse in the accademie? And how did the exchange of ideas among members of these accademie inform on the production and reception of different art forms?

Topics of interest might include but are not limited to: interaction among different media, in particular, sculpture, architecture and literature; ekphrasis and visual rhetoric; the extent to which artists (and their patrons) relied on technical, scientific or theological formulations and how these influenced the making and reception of artworks; or the analysis of the dialogic mode of paragone through the analogy between the liberal arts and other branches of knowledge, such as the natural sciences, medicine or theology.

Please send an abstract (150-word maximum), a paper title (15-word maximum), 3-5 keywords, academic affiliation, PhD completion date (past or expected), a brief curriculum vitae, and any audio/visual requirements to Stefano Colombo (stefano.colombo.365@gmail.com) by August 8, 2020.

Tags:  Accademie  Art and Architecture  Art Theory  Classical Tradition  Ekphrasis  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Literature  Paragone  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture  Rhetoric  Sculpture  Transmediality 

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Gardens and Academies in Early Modern Europe

Posted By Denis Ribouillault, Tuesday, June 30, 2020

The objective of this session or series of sessions is to explore the place and role of gardens in early modern academies. Although research on academies has expanded considerably in recent decades (Vagenheim et al., 2008), little has been written about the places where they met, including gardens, with the possible exception of the Bosco Parrasio in Rome (Grant, 2018). How did an academy choose its setting and why? How have literary and scientific activities and debates influenced the architectural, artistic and/or horticultural qualities of the chosen venue? In other words, can the iconography of gardens be linked to academic activities?  What role, for example, did the memory of Plato's Academy and Greek academies in general play in the development of early modern gardens (Ribouillault, 2018)? These questions demand that the garden be considered as a place of performance and require a multidisciplinary and intermedial approach. Articles on the use of gardens in scientific academies are particularly welcome.

Katrina Grant, «The Bosco Parrasio as a Site of Pleasure and of Sadness», Histoire culturelle de l'Europe 3 (2018) ; URL : http://www.unicaen.fr/mrsh/hce/index.php?id=1254

Denis Ribouillault, « Hortus academicus : les académies de la renaissance et le jardin », in Des jardins et des livres, Michael Jakob (ed.), Geneva: Mètis Press, 2018, p. 23-34 ; URL : http://hdl.handle.net/1866/23258

Ginette Vagenheim et al. (eds), Les Académies dans l’Europe humaniste. Idéaux et pratiques, Geneva: Droz, 2008.

Proposals of no more than 300 words with a title and a short bio (300 words max.) should be sent to ginette.vagenheim@univ-rouen.fr and denis.ribouillault@umontreal.ca before July, 31, 2020. Please indicate « RSA 2021 » in the subject line.

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Gardens  History of Science  History of Technology  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art  Literature  Renaissance Architecture  social history  Villa 

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Emblem Studies

Posted By Tamar Cholcman, Friday, June 26, 2020

Call for Papers

Discipline of Emblems
Renaissance Society of America 2021
Dublin
7–10 April 2021

The Discipline of Emblem Studies invites papers and panels for its sessions at the annual meeting (which may be on site or virtual). We may submit up to four panels. We invite papers and panels on any subject appropriate to our discipline and especially welcome those that address the following:

  • New perspectives on the origins of emblems
  • The whole is greater than the sum of its parts: Exceptions to the tripartite emblem
  • Emblems of the Unknown: Utopia and the New World
  • Emblems and the Republic of Letters
  • Emblems and Cosmology
  • New perspective on emblem books
  • Practice and theory of emblem digitization.
  • Jesuit emblems (in memory of G. Richard Dimler)

Panels must be organized by a current member of the Renaissance Society of America. Panels should ordinarily include no more than three presenters.

Please submit the following:

  • A session title no longer than 15 words;
  • 150 word abstract for description of the panel;
  • 150 word abstract for each of its papers;
  • 300 word curriculum vitae for each presenter, including full name, affiliation, and email address;
  • any audiovisual requirements;
  • session keywords.

Papers may be submitted by anyone. Graduate students should be doctoral candidates (post prelims).

Please submit the following in a single Word document:

  • 150 word abstract of the paper;
  • 300 word curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address;
  • any audiovisual requirements;
  • paper keywords.

Send all materials to Tamar Cholcman (cholcman@tauex.tau.ac.il). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America.

Please note: RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Art History  Book History  Cultural Networks  Digital Humanities  Discipline Representatives  Emblem  Emblems  Humanism  Jesuits  Literature  Neo-Latin Literature  Print  Visual Studies 

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Sequestration and the City: Confinement, Exclusion, and Enclosure

Posted By Jessica A. Stevenson Stewart, Monday, June 22, 2020

Although cities are fundamentally sites of connectivity, the pandemic-induced isolation of 2020 has renewed our awareness of the strain and tension that seclusion brings, especially in densely urbanized areas. This session draws on our recent experiences of the Covid19 crisis and revisits the history of urban disconnection and disconnectedness. Rather than focusing strictly on epidemics, we want to take a broader view of seclusion and sequestration as marked forms of social exclusion. While scholarship in the wake of mobility studies has expanded our understanding of the global flow of people, goods, and ideas, it has often overlooked social and spatial barriers that constrained movement, particularly within cities. For even though urban centers functioned as networks, they also instituted and perpetuated division, separation, and exclusion.

This session explores the spatial and representational means by which certain persons and groups were separated from the urban life around them, either voluntarily or involuntarily. We ask how zones or sites of separation were established within the city, and how the immobility of some interacted with the mobility of others. Such spaces may have been constructed by and for an individual, by civic authorities, or by groups formed with the intent of exclusivity. The confinement in question may have been a form of punishment (e.g., the prisoner, heretic, or exile), a means of quarantine (e.g., the leper or plague victim), a welcome and self-imposed withdrawal, (e.g., the individual in a “closet” or study), or an ethical detachment, (e.g., religious retreat behind walls or within cloisters). We ask whether urban configurations hid the excluded and isolated, or if their presence was known and even advertised.

What architecture, rituals, and representations kept the excluded bodies present and acknowledged in the urban psyche? How did the exclusion of some mark civic identity for others? How did the interior and exterior architecture of particular buildings enforce social separation? What forms of material culture accompanied the separated individual and were those objects part of what marked the person as apart from normative civic culture? When were seclusion and sequestration valued? What historical philosophies informed early modern conceptualizations of exclusion, seclusion, isolation, and confinement? What contemporary theories provide frameworks for understanding the psychological, social, and geographical valences of these experiences?

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief curriculum vitae by August 1 to Elizabeth Honig at elizahonig@yahoo.com and Jessica Stewart at sinopia@gmail.com

Session Keywords: Urban History, Immobility, Exclusion

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  History  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Material Studies  Religious Studies  Urban Studies  Visual Studies 

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“Otium cum dignitate”. Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

Posted By Cristina Agüero, Friday, June 19, 2020
Updated: Saturday, June 20, 2020

“Otium cum dignitate”.

Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

CFP | RSA Dublin 2021, April 7-10

 

 

The concept of “otium cum dignitate” –fruitful leisure in opposition to idleness– present in Cicero’s texts was restored by the Humanism and pervaded the noble culture from 15th to 17th centuries. “If you have a garden and a library” –wrote Cicero to his friend Varrone– “you have everything you need” (Epistulae ad Familiares IX, 4). The model of the Renaissance ville formulated by architects such as Sangallo and Palladio responded to this ideal by reflecting the principles of Vitruvio’s treatise De architectura. This revival of the antique forms implied the assumption of the ideals of decorum (adequation of the house to the social rank and public role of its proprietary) and magnificence as a sign of distinction. Consequently, the garden, the gallery and the library were core elements inside the dwellings of early modern patricians. These places not only played an essential function within the strategies of representation and construction of the family memory but also served as a scenario for the “conspicuous leisure” (as named by Veblen in The Theory of the Leisure Class) distinctive of the elites. Art collecting, gardening, and amateur writing, painting or drawing were common practices among early modern nobles and sovereigns, who found shelter from melancholy –the disease of the soul– in the rarities of the cabinets, the beauties of the galleries and the amenities of the gardens (teeming with fountains, sculptures, exotic plants, fruits and animals). They hosted intellectuals and artist to amuse themselves with the art of conversation, commenting poems or discussing the stories represented in the paintings they gathered. The theater performances, banquets and concerts celebrated by members of the political and ecclesiastical elites –often in honor of foreign visitors– evinced the performative and political dimensions of some forms of “otium”.

 

This panel aims to examine various aspects of the leisure events and activities cultivated by the early modern elites; considering their cultural, symbolical and political implications, the venues (ville, family palaces, libraries, galleries, banqueting houses, gardens, etc.) where they took place, and the artifacts and artistic creations (books, poems, plays, paintings, etc.) used or produced in these places. Studies on the cultural networks that thrive on the idea of “otium” (like the Accademia degli oziosi) and presentations concerning the concept of leisure and the criticism articulated thereon by moralists and arbitristas are also desirable.

 

We welcome proposals by researchers from every humanistic discipline –including history of art, history, philosophy and literature– at any career stage. Those interested in participating in this panel are requested to submit an abstract (no more than 300 words) and a short academic bio to cristina.aguero@ub.edu by July 31

 

*Please note that all speakers must become RSA members in order to present their papers at the conference.

 
Organizer: Cristina Agüero (Universidad de Barcelona).

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Cultural Networks  Galleries  Gardens  Humanism  Leisure  Libraries  Literature  Material Culture  Nobility  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Poetry  Sculpture  Villa 

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Doubting Women: Women as Agents of Doubt in Early Modern Europe

Posted By Marco Faini, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

This panel aims to explore the role of women in fostering and disseminating doubts in early modern Europe. Doubt in Renaissance Europe was a flexible tool, employed to question official narratives, voice one’s ideas without openly stating them, to propose alternative versions of given facts, to promote dialogue, and to foster irenic ideals. Doubt could also be a means to shape one’s self in contrast with social roles and rules. In religious matters, doubt could become an instrument of self-defense against the delusions of the devil or against the temptation to believe oneself the recipient of special supernatural gifts. Women were traditionally considered prone to doubt and scruples. But what happened when women actively embraced doubt as an intellectual practice? This panel explores female figures – either real or fictional – who voiced, or even symbolically embodied, doubt(s) in a variety of fields, among which:

  • Religion
  • Social relations
  • Gender relations
  • Science and philosophy
  • Literature and art

Your proposal should include a title, a 150-word abstract, key-words (up to five), a one-paragraph CV (in prose, max. 300 words; please specify your PhD completion date, past or expected), and an indication of whether you have any audio / visual needs.

Please submit your proposal as well as any inquiries to Dr Marco Faini: marco.faini@unive.it by August 1 2020.

Tags:  history  literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Althusser's Renaissance

Posted By Martin Moraw, Saturday, June 13, 2020

Louis Althusser’s thought is receiving renewed attention in the humanities and social sciences. This session seeks to bring together scholars of various disciplines and specializations to explore the potential of a return to Althusser in the particular context of Renaissance/early modern studies. Contributions may reflect on Althusser’s writings on early modern figures, make use of Althusserian concepts to produce new readings of early modern texts, or engage relevant theoretical questions.

Topics may include: Althusser, Machiavelli, politics; Althusser, Galileo, science; Althusser, Spinoza, philosophy; structure, conjuncture, contradiction, overdetermination, uneven development; Althusser and theater; symptomatic reading; ideology, subjectivation; aleatory materialism, the encounter.

Please send proposals including a paper title, an abstract (200 words), and a one-paragraph CV to Martin Moraw (martin.moraw@aucegypt.edu) by July 31, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy 

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Violence, Trauma, and Memory: Warfare from the Hundred Years’ War to the Thirty Years’ War

Posted By Alexandra Onuf, Friday, June 12, 2020

This panel seeks to specifically examine the interwoven relationships between violence, trauma, and memory across the early modern period from the Hundred Years’ War (1337-1453) to the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648). Scholars have often assumed that medieval and early modern societies were so bellicose as to be inured to the consequences of trauma, or that they simply had no framework for processing its impacts. But recent scholarship has begun to reveal how the fields of memory studies and trauma theory, both of which originally focused on modern periods, can be fruitfully applied to the study of early modern communities. Literary scholars and historians in particular have probed the ways in which the violence and trauma of war were experienced, expressed and memorialized in early-modern discourse. The goal of this panel is to open up an interdisciplinary conversation on how trauma from and memories of war took shape in the early modern period in a variety of different forms and mediums, from individual diaries and personal accounts, to pamphlets and popular song, poetry, prints, or cartographic endeavors, to official chronicles or policies of oubliance. We hope to bring together scholars of literature, history, and visual culture whose work centers on the history of emotions, violence studies, and trauma theory. Taken together, these varied methodologies will offer a more nuanced understanding of how late medieval and early modern peoples experienced, processed and inscribed the violence of war into personal and collective memory and memorials.

Interested participants should send a paper title (25 word max.) and abstract (200 word max.), and a brief CV (2 pages max.) to Alexandra Onuf (onuf@hartford.edu) and Kate McGrath (mcgrathkae@ccsu.edu) by August 1, 2020.

Tags:  Art History  History  Literature  Memory Studies  Trauma Theory  Visual Studies 

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