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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

CfP: The Material Culture of the Thirty Years’ War

Posted By Roisin Watson, Wednesday, July 22, 2020

The Thirty Years’ War is often synonymous with destruction. Tales of its devastation in central Europe – including pillaging, fire, theft, looting –  frame histories of the seventeenth century. The war’s destructive power would appear to be irreconcilable with histories of early modern material culture, with their focus on the dynamics of production and consumption. But this panel proposes to rethink the way we view relationships between conflict and material culture in the early modern period by exploring how the damage wrought by the Thirty Years’ War established new opportunities for material production and memory making. How did warfare reconfigure the trajectories of existing objects as their biographies became entangled with the unfolding conflict? Building upon cultural studies of the Thirty Years’ War, a focus on the material brings new insight to the experience of conflict. How were individuals’ involvement in war shaped by their material interactions? How did soldiers and civilians navigate the extremes of warfare through objects? In what ways did objects’ proximity to and intimacy with conflict determine the value placed upon them by contemporaries? How did encounters with destruction shape the afterlife of objects of war? Broadening our definition of “objects of warfare,” we wish to move away solely from the study of armour and weapons to include the everyday, the ephemeral and the accidental. 

Papers might consider, but do not have to be limited to:

  • Soldiers as artists and artisans
  • The migration of objects
  • Plunder, booty, looting and the Brandschatzung
  • The afterlives of objects associated with the Thirty Years’ War
  • Ruins and rebuilding
  • Commemoration and objects of war
  • Preserving, collecting, and displaying relics and souvenirs of war

Proposals for papers should be sent to roisin.watson@history.ox.ac.uk & a.stielau@ucl.ac.uk by 10th August 2020. They should include paper title and abstract (no more than 200 words), along with a short CV (one page). 

If you are interested in this topic but will not be attending RSA or have already committed to another panel, please still be in touch as we hope to hold other events in the future.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Material Culture  Thirty Years' War  Warfare 

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Figures of Polyglossia in British Early Modern Culture

Posted By Agnes Lafont, Monday, July 20, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

This panel, which is part of the “Translation and Polyglossia” project (https://tape1617.hypotheses.org/), wishes to explore ways in which polyglossia is inscribed textually as well as pictorially in early modern books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and other ephemera. It aims at investigating how common European knowledge was not only translated but adapted and naturalized in English book history. Emblems, woodcuts, engravings, broadsheets, dictionaries, and annotated or edited material in which several languages are co-present on the page may serve as examples. How was polyglossia made visible and marketed in early modern Britain? How did the figuration of polyglossia help transmit knowledge in a specific manner?

The study of the representation of polyglossia will interrogate:

  • The respective roles of various languages on the page
  • The different relationships to auctoritas that the use of a language other than English may induce (through the use of quotations, the reuse of engravings and woodcuts, etc.)
  • The functioning of a moving hermeneutics by an author (who imagines her or his text in various languages), by a reader (who annotates or makes comments in the margins)
  • The sociology of milieus who are conversant in several languages, have a shared erudition, use coded language, hieroglyphs...

Topics for consideration include:

  • annotated books and manuscripts
  • emblem books
  • polyglot dictionaries
  • polyglot documents produced by women
  • documents of performance
  • broadside ballads
  • pamphlets, periodicals, and ephemera

All types of documents may be brought to the discussion as long as they circulated in the British Isles in the early modern period, including books not printed in England but with attested circulations.

Please submit the following materials to organizers Agnès Lafont (agnes.lafont@univ-montp3.fr) and Laetitia Sansonetti (l.sansonetti@parisnanterre.fr) by August 7th to be considered for inclusion: paper title (15 words maximum); abstract (150 words maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300 words maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  Emblems  English Literature  European literature  Literature  Material Culture  Multilingualism  Print  translation 

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New Avenues for Processional Devotions

Posted By Mitzi Kirkland-Ives, Sunday, July 19, 2020

In the late medieval and early modern period a body of devotional practices emerged in which Christians engaged not only in contemplation of the episodes of the Passion and similar narratives but also in imaginative reenactment of those events: the Stations of the Cross in various forms, the Sorrows of the Virgin, the Falls of Christ, and related traditions. These devotions were often structured via passage from station to station across a real (or purely imagined) landscape, sometimes mapped out onto the preexisting landscape—urban streets, cloisters, church interiors—and sometimes supported by environments constructed for the purpose: Sacri monti, field chapels, and the like. This session seeks to highlight new contributions to this area of study in art history, literature, and other relevant fields of study; particularly welcome are contributions reflecting developments across a wide geographical scope including the Americas and less studied corners of Europe and the Mediterranean basin.

Please submit a title and 150 word abstract to Mitzi Kirkland-Ives (mkirklandives@missouristate.edu), as well as a two-page research c.v., by August 10, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Religion  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Visual Studies 

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Rubrics and Rubrication in Medieval and Early Modern Book Cultures

Posted By Jane F. Raisch, Monday, July 13, 2020

Despite the fact that rubrication is one of the most visible textual components on printed and manuscript pages - from ancient Egypt to the Islamic world - it remains one of the most undertheorized. Scholarly attention in recent decades has focussed on the many ways in which paratexts organize and convey information, especially how the margins afford a space in which the authority of the text is displaced and decentred. But current theories of authorship and of book history find it difficult to account for the textual power of rubrication, frequently seen as the sole-purview of medieval manuscripts. This panel will seek to correct this oversight by inviting papers on questions of rubrication and rubrics across late medieval and early modern books. Unlike the paratext, the rubric is often situated prominently within the body of the text, and yet clearly remains distinct from it. Standing apart from such authoriality, the rubric nonetheless profoundly inflects the reader’s encounter with the text in ways that have yet to be fully understood. This panel aims to deepen our understanding through an interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary exploration of rubrication from diverse cultural traditions.

Papers might explore:

  • The ways in which rubrics transition between manuscript and print
  • The rubric as title, and its role in attributing the text to a particular author
  • The changes in rubrication across multiple copies of the same text
  • Editing rubrics (in or from medieval/early modern texts)
  • Writing rubrics, and authorial rubrication
  • Reading rubrics, and the role of the reader
  • Rubrication and religious texts/confessional identities and rubrication
  • Sacred texts and the uses of red
  • Technical processes of rubrication across manuscript and print; scribal practices in the age of print; methods and processes of printing in red
  • How ornamental rubrication inflects the printed text
  • Rubricated marginalia
  • Rubrication and epigraphy/ rubrication and philology/ rubrication and scholarly practice

Please email a 300-word proposal and a short CV to Dr Jane Raisch (jane.raisch@york.ac.uk) and Dr K P Clarke (kp.clarke@york.ac.uk) by August 12, 2020.

Tags:  Antiquarianism  Art History  Book History  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Education  English Literature  European literature  History of Technology  Material Culture  Materials and Materiality  pedagogy 

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Lists in Early Modern Women’s Writing: Life and Literature *extended deadline*

Posted By Nikolina Hatton, Friday, July 10, 2020
Updated: Monday, August 3, 2020

Lists proliferate in texts written by women and texts written about women, from the typical enumeration of “women worthies” within the querelle des femmes tradition to the lists of possessions and household accounts found in early modern commonplace books. Within women’s writing itself, functional everyday lists and literary lists sometimes merge, such as in Isabella Whitney’s “The Maner of her Wyll”—a poetic description of and reflection on London in the form of a Last Will and Testament.  

This panel seeks to reflect on the forms and functions of the list within early modern women’s writings and everyday lives. Literary studies has seen a recent resurgence of interest in the list, as scholars have noted the list’s ability to bring together questions of functionality and literariness. Scholars have shown that, as a form that deceptively appears simpler than it really is, the list and examinations of it shed light on the evolution and manipulation of literary conventions and can further signal important discursive distinctions between texts that at first feel otherwise quite similar. Such a project intersects well with the study of women’s writing in the early modern period, not only because lists appear so often in investigations into women’s everyday lives, but also because the corpus of literature by women is generally marked by subtle but significant deviations within the genres deemed acceptable for women writers. In material culture studies as well, the list has been hailed as an affordance for accomplishing everyday tasks as well as a container that emphasizes metonymy and materiality over metaphorical meanings. This panel seeks to open up these questions by broadly investigating the use of the list within early modern women’s utilitarian and literary writings.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send your paper’s title (max 15 words), a short abstract (150 words), your CV, and institutional affiliation/contact details to Nikolina Hatton (n.hatton@lmu.de) by 10 August 2020. A longer abstract may also be included in addition.

Tags:  Book History  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Daily Life  Diaries  Ekphrasis  English Literature  fiction  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Global Literature  History  interdiscplinary  Italian Literature  Libraries  Material Culture  Material Studies  Materiality  Memory Studies  networks  poetry  Portuguese Literature  Print  Spanish literature  Women and Gender 

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Theatres of Knowledge: On the Theatricalisation of Scientific Practices

Posted By Oscar Seip, Tuesday, July 7, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

Studying the intertwined history of the theatre and the sciences is crucial to understand the development of different styles and strategies that developed during the Early Modern Period for the discovery and presentation of knowledge. Indeed, previous scholarship has studied the importance of the locality of the theatre to understand how scientific practitioners acquired and disseminated knowledge. While this has focused on the anatomy theatre, its impact beyond the field of medicine has received relatively little consideration. In this panel, we explore the anatomy theatre in relation to a broader vision of the world as a theatre.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how the anatomy theatre relates to a hypothesised radical shift towards the theatricalisation of scientific practices. Did it lead to a new genre of printed works? Was it a new tool and practice of observing the world? Were these observations recorded and transmitted in a new and unique way?  How is the theatre different from contemporary metaphors such as the mirror and the book of nature? How does the theatre relate to the concepts of performance and spectacle? In other words, is there a distinctly theatrical style and strategy for the discovery and presentation of knowledge?

Our aim is to compare case studies of the theatre’s use across different periods (from the Early Modern period to the Enlightenment), fields of science or subjects (e.g. geography, medicine, architecture, mathematics), and different kinds of knowledge (practical or theoretical) and the different styles and strategies that they employ to represent this knowledge (figural/pictorial or abstract and textual). Particular attention will be given in this to the translation from the (imaginative) mental and physical space of the theatre to the space of the page.

We invite speakers (including junior scholars) from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. Proposals for 20-minute papers (no more than 150 words), together with a short CV should be sent to seip@biblhertz.it by 31 July 2020. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with any questions.

 

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Digital Humanities  Dissection  English Literature  European literature  History  History of Medicine  History of Science  Humanism  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Renaissance  Visual Studies 

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The Burden of Blood in Early Modern Spain

Posted By Amy E. Sheeran, Thursday, June 25, 2020

Although blood, as a symbol, has always been replete with meanings, in the context of early modern Spain, it becomes uniquely potent. This panel seeks to consider blood as a category of representational analysis, following the lead of Gil Anidjar and Joan Scott. In particular, within the context of the ideology of blood purity with its attention to blood’s content, origin, and legibility, representations of blood are evocative and layered. Recent attention to the history of blood purity statutes and their influence, as well as to the role of blood in shaping national, imperial, and religious identity in Spain, prompts further analysis of blood’s discursive potential in the early modern Iberian world. In this panel, we aim to consider how representational works approach and articulate the multilayered meanings blood allows in this context. We welcome interdisciplinary submissions focused on literary, historical, or visual works that consider medical and scientific knowledge; blood and its relation to race; the role of blood in signaling or establishing class; theological questions and debates; blood as a nexus of gender and sexuality, and other related concerns.

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with a proposed title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief CV to Amy Sheeran at sheeran1@otterbein.edu and Rachel Burk at rburk@ndm.edu by August 1.

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Nobility  Religion  Spanish Empire  theology  Women and Gender 

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**Deadline extended 8/10** SHARP at RSA: Intersectional Book History

Posted By Andie Silva, Monday, June 22, 2020
Updated: Thursday, August 6, 2020

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will sponsor up to four sessions at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting in Dublin, Ireland on 7-10 April, 2021. SHARP @ RSA brings together scholars working on any aspect of the creation, dissemination, and reception of manuscript and print and their digital remediation. Special consideration will be given to early career scholars and BIPOC applicants.

The proposed theme for this year is “Intersectional Book History.” This theme reflects ongoing conversations about engaging our work in broader political and social contexts that move the field forward and look to the needs and goals of the next generation of book history scholars. What work are we doing to centralize and call attention to under-studied, under-represented texts and authors? How has book history contributed to upholding hegemonic, exclusionary systems, and what can be done to disrupt this? What does it take to promote a book history that is radical, inclusive, and accessible?

We invite individual submissions or fully constituted panels/roundtables about the study or remediation of books and manuscripts from 1350 to 1700 across a range of perspectives, especially work that focuses on global perspectives. Roundtables may also consider provocations, theories, and new questions orienting the field. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Decolonial approaches to book history and/or print culture
  • Archival studies of underrepresented authors or understudied texts
  • Feminist and Queer bibliography
  • Racialized and gendered labor in/and book production and its digital remediations
  • Women in/and the print marketplace (stationers, printers, authors, readers)
  • Decolonizing book history pedagogy

Please send a 150-word abstract and a brief CV to Dr. Andie Silva (asilva@york.cuny.edu) by 10 August (note that this is earlier than the RSA’s own deadline). Accepted applicants must be members of SHARP by the time they register for the RSA conference but if you are experiencing financial instability please do not let that keep you from applying! SHARP and RSA are both open to discussing flexible dues.

Please consider the following RSA guidelines before applying:

  • You must be a member of the RSA by the time you register for the conference. RSA will be taking into consideration the financial strains put on many due to the COVID-19 pandemic. If you are concerned about the cost of membership, please get in touch with RSA to discuss alternatives.
  • Graduate students must be within two years of defending their dissertations to be considered as speakers.
  • Individuals may submit only one paper for consideration (including rollovers from 2020). This paper may be an independent proposal, a paper proposed for a seminar session, or part of an organized panel.

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Tags:  Book History  Digital Humanities  Emerging Scholars  Global Literature  Material Culture  Women and Gender 

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Reviving the Scottish Renaissance: New perspectives on old alliances

Posted By Jill Harrison, Sunday, June 21, 2020

A member of the Scottish parliament recently stated that “Scotland’s relationship with Europe and the rest of the world is critical not just to our economy but to our wider society”. Six hundred years earlier Scotland had reached the same conclusion and during the reigns of the Stewart kings, James I, II, III and IV, c.1406 -1530, the country actively forged significant intellectual, cultural and economic ties with Europe and beyond. While Scottish monarchs rarely travelled they fostered sophisticated diplomatic links with foreign powers and their sphere of interest and influence extended from the Low Countries, France and Italy to Scandinavia, the Baltic and the Levant.

This interdisciplinary panel seeks to reassess the reach and significance of Scotland’s geographical cultural encounters and revive the idea of a vibrant and early Scottish Renaissance, outward looking and dynamic. Papers are invited which take a fresh approach not only to works of art, architecture, literature, music and material culture but little discussed topics such as medicine, garden design and heraldry.

Please send proposals to the organizer (jill.harrison@open.ac.uk) by Friday, 31st July. Paper proposals must include:

  • Paper title (25 words max)
  • Abstract (150 words max)
  • Your full name, current affiliation, email address, and Ph.D. completion date (past or expected)
  • A brief c.v. (300 words max)
  • A list of keywords (8 max)

Please note: Speakers must become RSA members by November 1st.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Cultural Networks  Gardens  Geographies  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Scotland 

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“Otium cum dignitate”. Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

Posted By Cristina Agüero, Friday, June 19, 2020
Updated: Saturday, June 20, 2020

“Otium cum dignitate”.

Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

CFP | RSA Dublin 2021, April 7-10

 

 

The concept of “otium cum dignitate” –fruitful leisure in opposition to idleness– present in Cicero’s texts was restored by the Humanism and pervaded the noble culture from 15th to 17th centuries. “If you have a garden and a library” –wrote Cicero to his friend Varrone– “you have everything you need” (Epistulae ad Familiares IX, 4). The model of the Renaissance ville formulated by architects such as Sangallo and Palladio responded to this ideal by reflecting the principles of Vitruvio’s treatise De architectura. This revival of the antique forms implied the assumption of the ideals of decorum (adequation of the house to the social rank and public role of its proprietary) and magnificence as a sign of distinction. Consequently, the garden, the gallery and the library were core elements inside the dwellings of early modern patricians. These places not only played an essential function within the strategies of representation and construction of the family memory but also served as a scenario for the “conspicuous leisure” (as named by Veblen in The Theory of the Leisure Class) distinctive of the elites. Art collecting, gardening, and amateur writing, painting or drawing were common practices among early modern nobles and sovereigns, who found shelter from melancholy –the disease of the soul– in the rarities of the cabinets, the beauties of the galleries and the amenities of the gardens (teeming with fountains, sculptures, exotic plants, fruits and animals). They hosted intellectuals and artist to amuse themselves with the art of conversation, commenting poems or discussing the stories represented in the paintings they gathered. The theater performances, banquets and concerts celebrated by members of the political and ecclesiastical elites –often in honor of foreign visitors– evinced the performative and political dimensions of some forms of “otium”.

 

This panel aims to examine various aspects of the leisure events and activities cultivated by the early modern elites; considering their cultural, symbolical and political implications, the venues (ville, family palaces, libraries, galleries, banqueting houses, gardens, etc.) where they took place, and the artifacts and artistic creations (books, poems, plays, paintings, etc.) used or produced in these places. Studies on the cultural networks that thrive on the idea of “otium” (like the Accademia degli oziosi) and presentations concerning the concept of leisure and the criticism articulated thereon by moralists and arbitristas are also desirable.

 

We welcome proposals by researchers from every humanistic discipline –including history of art, history, philosophy and literature– at any career stage. Those interested in participating in this panel are requested to submit an abstract (no more than 300 words) and a short academic bio to cristina.aguero@ub.edu by July 31

 

*Please note that all speakers must become RSA members in order to present their papers at the conference.

 
Organizer: Cristina Agüero (Universidad de Barcelona).

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Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Cultural Networks  Galleries  Gardens  Humanism  Leisure  Libraries  Literature  Material Culture  Nobility  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Poetry  Sculpture  Villa 

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Mining for the Earth-Based Sciences

Posted By Katie Jakobiec, Thursday, June 18, 2020

Organizers: Stefano Gulizia (PAN, Warsaw); Katie Jakobiec (University of Toronto)

This panel is sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS), University of Toronto, for the 67th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, to be held in Dublin, Ireland, on 7-10 April 2021. We warmly invite submissions and hope to select 3-4 papers for presentation according to the following outline.

Between 1450 and 1650, in the aftermath of a great technological change in metallurgy, a vast Central European space including centres such as Trento, Chemnitz, and Goslar specialized and clustered into new industrial hubs. In our historiography of the period, as well, mining has emerged as a nexus for studying the interface between natural history, physiology, and the processing of materials. Thanks to Anna Marie Roos’s The Salt of the Earth (Brill 2007) and Laboratories of Art, edited by Sven Dupré (Springer 2014), to name only a few contributions, we have a refined understanding of how this artisanal knowledge related to alchemy and philosophy. More recently, a special issue of Renaissance Studies (34.1: 2019) edited by Tina Asmussen and Pamela O. Long undertook the ambitious and impressive task of accounting for Berggeschrey, or ‘mountain uproar’ in all its technological, legal, textual, and symbolic features, including the core ambivalence of ethnographic collections up to the new histories of labor in a reunited Germany.

By design, our session assigns a premium on epistemic practices over the two major viewpoints adopted by historians, namely folklore and socio-economic development. Overall, we would like to see the Renaissance mine and its paperwork as a concrete example of Hans-Jörg Rheinberger’s laboratory, and how objects appear and disappear, or perhaps, move from being merely ordinary to epistemic. Another larger outlook of this project is environmental. Paracelsus already endowed subterranean things with an enduring, palingenetic power which was then developed within an experimental framework; both James Delbourgo and Philippa Hellawell argued for a substantial yet persuasive extension of the domain of mining to include seascapes and submarine knowledge.

Given all this, and without pretenses to limit the analysis only to these points, we propose that:

  • the morphing of sites of extraction into sites of connectivity is potentially problematic; likewise, it is difficult to constraint the sheer variety of actors and agencies at a mine into the concept of a “trading zone” in which not everyone was “trading” (e.g. some were ‘accounting for’, others ‘enslaved to’, and so on). Could we improve on our metaphorical usage? In this regard, Renée Raphael’s 2019 essay in RS offers a valuable model of how the current ‘practical’ view of the trading zone hides a heavy reliance on textual learning.
  • there is a relation between cartographic curiosity and mining that still awaits to be fully explored, and this means dealing with maps, sections, landscapes, and representations of specimens. For example, we couldn’t find any reference in English-speaking scholarship to the Delineatio Wielicensis of 1645, that is, the map of the massive salt mine of Wieliczka, outside Cracow, in the context of the Polish scientific book of the seventeenth-century. How do we assess mining with regard to visual representation in earth sciences histories? Could we profitably turn to the tradition of geodesy and its instruments? And does the cartographic imagination link mining to topography, territoriality, and the military arts?
  • as a corollary to the last point, and because of our typical reliance on tacit or vernacular learning within an interdisciplinary-oriented history of knowledge, issues of mobility and redeployment have completely overwhelmed the traditional framework of geology, seen as the birth of a “new” science. Yet, there is still a lot to be gained from the longue durée of fifteenth-century artisanal humanism, as Ivano Dal Prete has stressed. We simply suggest that we need better studies of how mining relates to epistemic images of “deep time;” and to remind ourselves that even rocks and fossils were aligned to anatomical exercises.
  • so far, almost the entirety of our case studies came from the German-speaking world, which, in point of fact, has become synonymous with research on Renaissance mining. There is, however, an untapped wealth of materials pertaining to Italy, the Czech Republic, Poland-Lithuania, and the colonial Iberian experience. How would the ensuing picture differ? And how did the historical actors consider these lesser-studied mining towns as a built environment? Did an enviro-technical site function more like a networked object?

The deadline is July 15, 2020; notification of acceptance will come within 15 days after that date. To apply please: 1) submit an abstract of no more than 250 words, describing your proposal, and a 150-word narrative CV, which would serve as a basis for introducing you; 2) explicitly confirm proof of, or plan to obtain, a RSA membership; and 3) send all this as a single attachment to both organizers, at sgulizia@gmail.com and katie.jakobiec@utoronto.ca

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Artillery  Classical Tradition  Humanism  Legal and Political Thought  Material Culture  Materiality  Medicine and Science  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture 

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The Renaissance Gallery

Posted By Andrea M. Gáldy, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Call for Papers

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

International Forum Collecting & Display

The Renaissance Gallery

Ever since the ground-breaking publications by Wolfram Prinz (1970) and Rosalys Coope (1986), the renaissance gallery has been investigated by art historians and historians of collecting as an architectural setting, as well as a room for display. The focus has been either on the general phenomenon or on individual case studies. Quite different from our modern perception of the gallery as a museum space for paintings or a commercial space used for trading in art, during the Renaissance, a gallery fulfilled a wider range of functions and displayed a much more diverse group of items than they do today.

Renaissance galleries were coveted by many but only owned by the nobility, males and occasionally females. Aristocratic owners displayed items that were in keeping with a particular collectors’ standard in close proximity to other collecting rooms such as libraries and armouries. Some galleries had a themed display that went hand in hand with a decorative programme devised by owner and court artists. Our sessions will therefore focus on different uses of the gallery, changes in terminology and architectural evolution. We are also interested in galleries created for women.

We invite proposals that present new approaches to issues of room type, diverse development, function, set-up, decoration and contents in a pan-European context, as well as with the gallery’s potential role for museology and museum displays.

If you wish to participate, please send your abstracts of 250 words and short bios (no CVs) by 15 July 2020 to collecting_display@hotmail.com.

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Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  British Empire  Classical Tradition  Digital Humanities  Italian Renaissance Art  Material Culture  Material Studies  Women and Gender 

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The Renaissance Cannon: Artillery between Art and Craft

Posted By Michael J. Waters, Tuesday, June 16, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2020

The development of metal cannons, bombards, and other large ordnance during the Renaissance led to fundamental shifts across a variety of domains including artisanal and artistic practices, architectural and urban design, and military technologies and strategies of warfare. The particular requirements of artillery to accommodate the explosive capacity of gunpowder catapulted arms production into a unique artistic and socio-political realm, just as their destructive force shocked the early modern historians, artisans, politicians, and scholars who experienced these weapons first hand. However, as artillery were instrumentalized as icons of authority and military hegemony, their spectacular power and symbolic meaning were also tempered through the proliferation of drawings and treatises. On the space of the page, technical issues related to form, production, and use took precedence.  In these ways, as well as through interdisciplinary craft practice, cannons entered into dialogue with other classes of objects that shared formal, material, and technical requirements. Recipes to cast artillery, for example, demonstrated the similarities between the manufacture of weaponry and other metal objects from bells to statuary. This session seeks papers that move beyond the specialized literature to explore the cannon as a point of interdisciplinary study across an increasingly interconnected globe. Potential areas of inquiry include: casting and fabrication processes, rhetoric that developed in response to the violent effects of weaponry, the aesthetics of artillery, the collecting of artillery during the Renaissance, and the relationship between arms, armory, fortresses, and human casualties.

Please email a title, abstract of 150 words, and a brief CV to Michael Waters (mw3114@columbia.edu) and Janna Israel (janna@alum.mit.edu) by July 31, 2020. Include your full name, email address, and current affiliation.

Tags:  Art History  Artillery  Cannon  Casting  Fabrication  History of Technology  Material Culture  Warfare 

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