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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Dr

Posted By Samantha J. Hughes-Johnson, Monday, August 3, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

(Deadline: 10 August 2020)

 

The Society for Confraternity Studies will sponsor a number of sessions at the 67thAnnual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (7- 10 April 2021) in Dublin. Accordingly, it invites proposals for papers on the following theme:

 

Contagium: Exploring the Nexus Between Confraternity, Pandemic and Renaissance Society

 

 

Since global communities are currently experiencing the liminal stage of withdrawing from varying degrees of quarantine and social isolation, the Society for Confraternity Studies is keen to scrutinize how Renaissance lay charitable institutions and sodalities grappled with the corporeal, emotional and fiscal injuries caused by society’s exposure to pandemics and epidemics and how their various actions can inform our own social, economic and psychological recuperation. Accordingly, we invite papers that explore the breadth and impact of lay sodalities operating in affected geographical areas between 1300 and 1700. Papers might focus on, but are not limited to the following topics:

  • The impact of pandemics on the restrictions of goods and humans and how quarantines, social distancing and limitations on travel affected regular confraternity operations and in turn, touched recipients of charity.
  • Legacies and donations awarded to confraternities in light of the plague. Including comparative studies of bequests during times of epidemic and good fortune and those that juxtapose geographically disparate data for the purpose of analysis.
  • The orientation of medical science and spiritual doctrine during epidemics and lay charitable institutions’ roles in this co-ordination.
  • Artistic commissions of confraternities and other lay charitable institutions and how these reflected the various injuries caused to society by outbreaks of pestilence. 
  • The impact of post-plague art, architecture, drama, music and ephemera commissioned by confraternities on public spaces and/or the popular conscience.
  • The actual and notional value of prophylactic measures designed to protect the body and soul during outbreaks and to what extent these were taken up by lay brotherhoods.
  •  Confraternity membership and how this was affected by one or more of the following: fear of mass burial; church and oratory closure; fear of the afterlife; concerns regarding spiritual conduct in the face of imminent death. 
  • The personal toll of plague on those lay brothers and sisters entrusted with public service, healthcare and the custody of people or objects.
  • The influence of pestilence on public and private confraternal ritual. 

 

Papers should concentrate on confraternal activities between 1300 and 1700. We are however, also particularly interested in proposals that discuss the value of emerging confraternity studies focusing on historical pandemics and how their findings can inform our own twenty-first century recuperation following our recent encounter with Covid 19. 

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email, the paper title (no longer than 15 words), the abstract of the paper (no longer than 150 words), a short academic C.V. (between one and five pages), and a series of key-words that suit the presentation. Please be sure all seven (7) categories of information are clearly provided. 

Please submit your proposal to Dr Samantha J.C. Hughes-Johnson at samanthajanecaroline@yahoo.co.uk by [10 August 2020].


Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  black death  bubonic plague  charity  confraternity  death and gender  Death studies  History  History of Medicine  history of science  hospitals  interdiscplinary  Italian Renaissance Art  lay sisterhoods  Material Studies  Medicine and Science  Performing Arts and Theater  piety  Religious Studies  Renaissance  renaissance medicine  ritual  Women and Gender 

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Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater

Posted By Luca Zipoli, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, July 14, 2020

“Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater”

Organizer: Luca Zipoli (Scuola Normale Superiore), luca.zipoli@sns.it

Chair: Laura Benedetti (Georgetown University)

ABSTRACT: Torquato Tasso encountered an extraordinary fortune between the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 18th thanks to his epic masterpiece, La Gerusalemme liberata (Jerusalem delivered). During the Renaissance and then the Baroque era, the poem was read, appreciated, and commented upon, but it also enjoyed many forms of adaptations through a vast range of visual arts and media, from illustrated printed editions to operas, from paintings and frescoes to theatrical plays. This panel aims to investigate, through a multidisciplinary and trans-cultural approach, this multidimensional phenomenon by examining some of the newly discovered and most relevant case studies of the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata, from the Cinquecento up to c. 1700. The theoretical framework of this panel will be rooted in the up-to-date paradigms of the “adaptation studies” (e.g. Thomas Leitch et alii 2020, Linda Hutcheon 2013, Julie Sanders 2005), and we will seek to respond to some of these questions: which features made Tasso’s poem such a rich source for creative re-elaborations? What do the multifaceted appropriations of La Gerusalemme tell us about the Baroque aesthetics and the various cultures that inspired them? How can the studies on Tasso’s reception contribute to the general field of adaptation studies? The aim of this panel is to present scarcely known or neglected cases within the long tradition of adaptations from Tasso, while shedding a new light on more frequent themes through cutting-edge interpretations and a new theoretical benchmark.

This panel invites paper proposals which may include but are in no way limited to:

  • illustrated printed editions of La Gerusalemme liberata (e.g. the editions Castello 1590, 1604, and 1617, Ruffinelli 1607, and Tozzi 1628);
  • paintings, drawings, and artworks inspired by the epic poem (e.g. the cases of Annibale Carracci, Nicolas Poussin, and Antoon van Dyck);
  • theatrical, music, and operatic adaptations of Tasso’s masterpiece (e.g. the works by Giaches de Wert, Claudio Monteverdi, and Giulio Rospigliosi);

Please send paper proposals to Luca Zipoli (luca.zipoli@sns.it) by 10 August 2020. The submissions must include:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc, no longer than 5 pages);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Book History  Italian Literature  Music  Performing Arts and Theater  Print  Reception Theory  Tasso  Visual Studies 

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Experiencing Death in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Ariana Ellis, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

Death saturates early modern Italian culture, from Dance of Death artwork and religious scripture to elaborate execution processions and the scaffold literature they inspired. But what did it mean to experience death? How did it look, sound, and feel? Where did the boundaries between life and death truly lie?

 

This panel is seeking papers that explore what it meant to experience death in Italy at any point during the early modern period. Analytical perspectives including: the senses, the emotions, philosophy, memorial culture, death culture, and art history are all welcome.

 

Please send proposals to the organizer (ariana.ellis@mail.utoronto.ca) by July 27th. Paper proposals must include:

 

·      Abstract (150 word maximum)

·      Paper title (15 word maximum)

·      Full name, current affiliation, and email address

·      CV (.pdf or .doc; 5 page maximum)

·      Date of PhD or terminal degree completion

       (past or expected)

 

Selected applicants will be notified as soon as possible. Please note- you must renew or activate an RSA membership to participate in the conference.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  death and gender  Death studies  Digital Humanities  emotional history  Florence  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  Memory Studies  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Sensory history  Sound studies  Urban Studies  Venice 

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Theatres of Knowledge: On the Theatricalisation of Scientific Practices

Posted By Oscar Seip, Tuesday, July 7, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

Studying the intertwined history of the theatre and the sciences is crucial to understand the development of different styles and strategies that developed during the Early Modern Period for the discovery and presentation of knowledge. Indeed, previous scholarship has studied the importance of the locality of the theatre to understand how scientific practitioners acquired and disseminated knowledge. While this has focused on the anatomy theatre, its impact beyond the field of medicine has received relatively little consideration. In this panel, we explore the anatomy theatre in relation to a broader vision of the world as a theatre.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how the anatomy theatre relates to a hypothesised radical shift towards the theatricalisation of scientific practices. Did it lead to a new genre of printed works? Was it a new tool and practice of observing the world? Were these observations recorded and transmitted in a new and unique way?  How is the theatre different from contemporary metaphors such as the mirror and the book of nature? How does the theatre relate to the concepts of performance and spectacle? In other words, is there a distinctly theatrical style and strategy for the discovery and presentation of knowledge?

Our aim is to compare case studies of the theatre’s use across different periods (from the Early Modern period to the Enlightenment), fields of science or subjects (e.g. geography, medicine, architecture, mathematics), and different kinds of knowledge (practical or theoretical) and the different styles and strategies that they employ to represent this knowledge (figural/pictorial or abstract and textual). Particular attention will be given in this to the translation from the (imaginative) mental and physical space of the theatre to the space of the page.

We invite speakers (including junior scholars) from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. Proposals for 20-minute papers (no more than 150 words), together with a short CV should be sent to seip@biblhertz.it by 31 July 2020. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with any questions.

 

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Digital Humanities  Dissection  English Literature  European literature  History  History of Medicine  History of Science  Humanism  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Renaissance  Visual Studies 

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RSA 2021 panel: Early Modern Erogenous Zones

Posted By Devin L. Byker, Monday, June 22, 2020

What parts of the early modern body were sexually stimulable? This panel seeks to build on the work of early modern scholars of sex such as Will Fisher, James Bromley, Will Stockton, and Karen Raber, who have shown how the thighs, the chin, the anus, and the lower body in its rhythmic contact with a galloping horse constituted, in early modernity, important erotic surfaces and orifices. While 19th-century discourses of sex produced the notion of “erogeneity” primarily in relation to physiological concentrations of nerve endings, this panel regards that conclusion as an explanation in search of a cause. If erogeneity is itself culturally and historically constructed, what bodily surfaces and orifices, genital or non-genital, lend themselves to or actively seek out sexual sensation, stimulation, penetration, caress, etc. in early modernity? Topics could include analyses of new erogenous zones or new readings of familiar erogenous zones. While I am primarily interested in papers about early modern English literature, I would happily consider papers that fall outside of those bounds. 

Please submit a paper title, 150-word abstract, and CV to Devin Byker, bykerdl@cofc.edu, by the end of Friday, July 31st.

Tags:  England  English Drama  English Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  sex  sexuality 

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“Otium cum dignitate”. Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

Posted By Cristina Agüero, Friday, June 19, 2020
Updated: Saturday, June 20, 2020

“Otium cum dignitate”.

Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

CFP | RSA Dublin 2021, April 7-10

 

 

The concept of “otium cum dignitate” –fruitful leisure in opposition to idleness– present in Cicero’s texts was restored by the Humanism and pervaded the noble culture from 15th to 17th centuries. “If you have a garden and a library” –wrote Cicero to his friend Varrone– “you have everything you need” (Epistulae ad Familiares IX, 4). The model of the Renaissance ville formulated by architects such as Sangallo and Palladio responded to this ideal by reflecting the principles of Vitruvio’s treatise De architectura. This revival of the antique forms implied the assumption of the ideals of decorum (adequation of the house to the social rank and public role of its proprietary) and magnificence as a sign of distinction. Consequently, the garden, the gallery and the library were core elements inside the dwellings of early modern patricians. These places not only played an essential function within the strategies of representation and construction of the family memory but also served as a scenario for the “conspicuous leisure” (as named by Veblen in The Theory of the Leisure Class) distinctive of the elites. Art collecting, gardening, and amateur writing, painting or drawing were common practices among early modern nobles and sovereigns, who found shelter from melancholy –the disease of the soul– in the rarities of the cabinets, the beauties of the galleries and the amenities of the gardens (teeming with fountains, sculptures, exotic plants, fruits and animals). They hosted intellectuals and artist to amuse themselves with the art of conversation, commenting poems or discussing the stories represented in the paintings they gathered. The theater performances, banquets and concerts celebrated by members of the political and ecclesiastical elites –often in honor of foreign visitors– evinced the performative and political dimensions of some forms of “otium”.

 

This panel aims to examine various aspects of the leisure events and activities cultivated by the early modern elites; considering their cultural, symbolical and political implications, the venues (ville, family palaces, libraries, galleries, banqueting houses, gardens, etc.) where they took place, and the artifacts and artistic creations (books, poems, plays, paintings, etc.) used or produced in these places. Studies on the cultural networks that thrive on the idea of “otium” (like the Accademia degli oziosi) and presentations concerning the concept of leisure and the criticism articulated thereon by moralists and arbitristas are also desirable.

 

We welcome proposals by researchers from every humanistic discipline –including history of art, history, philosophy and literature– at any career stage. Those interested in participating in this panel are requested to submit an abstract (no more than 300 words) and a short academic bio to cristina.aguero@ub.edu by July 31

 

*Please note that all speakers must become RSA members in order to present their papers at the conference.

 
Organizer: Cristina Agüero (Universidad de Barcelona).

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Cultural Networks  Galleries  Gardens  Humanism  Leisure  Libraries  Literature  Material Culture  Nobility  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Poetry  Sculpture  Villa 

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Contagium: Exploring the Nexus Between Confraternity, Pandemic and Renaissance Society

Posted By Samantha J. Hughes-Johnson, Friday, June 19, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

(Deadline: 1 August 2020)

 

The Society for Confraternity Studies will sponsor a number of sessions at the 67thAnnual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (7- 10 April 2021) in Dublin. Accordingly, it invites proposals for papers on the following theme:

 

Contagium: Exploring the Nexus Between Confraternity, Pandemic and Renaissance Society

 

 

Since global communities are currently experiencing the liminal stage of withdrawing from varying degrees of quarantine and social isolation, the Society for Confraternity Studies is keen to scrutinize how Renaissance lay charitable institutions and sodalities grappled with the corporeal, emotional and fiscal injuries caused by society’s exposure to pandemics and epidemics and how their various actions can inform our own social, economic and psychological recuperation. Accordingly, we invite papers that explore the breadth and impact of lay sodalities operating in affected geographical areas between 1300 and 1700. Papers might focus on, but are not limited to the following topics:

·     The impact of pandemics on the restrictions of goods and humans and how quarantines, social distancing and limitations on travel affected regular confraternity operations and in turn, touched recipients of charity.

·     Legacies and donations awarded to confraternities in light of the plague. Including comparative studies of bequests during times of epidemic and good fortune and those that juxtapose geographically disparate data for the purpose of analysis.

·     The orientation of medical science and spiritual doctrine during epidemics and lay charitable institutions’ roles in this co-ordination.

·     Artistic commissions of confraternities and other lay charitable institutions and how these reflected the various injuries caused to society by outbreaks of pestilence. 

·     The impact of post-plague art, architecture, drama, music and ephemera commissioned by confraternities on public spaces and/or the popular conscience.

·     The actual and notional value of prophylactic measures designed to protect the body and soul during outbreaks and to what extent these were taken up by lay brotherhoods.

·      Confraternity membership and how this was affected by one or more of the following: fear of mass burial; church and oratory closure; fear of the afterlife; concerns regarding spiritual conduct in the face of imminent death. 

·     The personal toll of plague on those lay brothers and sisters entrusted with public service, healthcare and the custody of people or objects.

·     The influence of pestilence on public and private confraternal ritual. 

 

Papers should concentrate on confraternal activities between 1300 and 1700. We are however, also particularly interested in proposals that discuss the value of emerging confraternity studies focusing on historical pandemics and how their findings can inform our own twenty-first century recuperation following our recent encounter with Covid 19. 

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email, the paper title (no longer than 15 words), the abstract of the paper (no longer than 150 words), a short academic C.V. (between one and five pages), and a series of key-words that suit the presentation. Please be sure all seven (7) categories of information are clearly provided. 

Please submit your proposal to Dr Samantha J.C. Hughes-Johnson at samanthajanecaroline@yahoo.co.uk by [1 August 2020].

Tags:  art  black death  charity  confraternity  economic history  epidemic  History of Medicine  hospitals  lay brotherhoods  lay sisterhoods  music  pandemic  Performing Arts and Theater  piety  ritual  social history  theology 

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Women, Domesticity and Closet Drama in Early Modern England

Posted By Aurelie Griffin, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

We are seeking proposals for an Epistémè-sponsored panel at RSA Dublin, 2021, entitled ‘Women, Domesticity and Closet Drama in Early Modern England’. This panel seeks to examine women’s agency in closet drama by questioning its definition as a ‘domestic’ genre. Closet drama is traditionally defined in opposition to commercial theatre, by pitting professional companies performing in front of a wide, mostly anonymous audience against amateur writers and actors performing for a restricted audience of families and friends within the home. This domestic context enabled women to perform at least some of the parts in plays that portray and usually focus on complex female characters, allowing them to break to a certain extent from the social constraints of the early modern stage, from which women were barred. Yet closet drama often engages with political, societal and historical issues, using the protected space of the home to reflect upon the wider cultural environment in which it takes place. Although these plays were first devised for a restricted circle, then circulated in manuscript form, they were also usually published – most notably those written by women: Mary Sidney Herbert’s Antonius (1592) and Elizabeth Cary’s The Tragedy of Mariam (1613). Those are usually considered as respectively the first and last of the corpus, which also comprises Fulke Greville’s Mustapha (1596) and Alaham (1601), Thomas Kyd’s Cornelia (1594) or Samuel Daniel’s Philotas (1604), among others. To what extent, therefore, can such plays be called ‘domestic’? How do they make use of the specificities of a private, enclosed space for their own production? What role(s) did the materiality of the home play in the creation of these plays, and did it influence the materiality of the texts themselves? How does closet drama challenge our understanding of what is private and what is public, and how did women in particular make use of such ambiguities to explore certain issues, affirm their own voices and legitimise their authorship? Despite the generalising phrase, ‘closet drama’, the corpus brings together plays whose similarities should not eclipse their differences, so that the responses to these questions will not necessarily be the same for all of the plays in the corpus. We are inviting proposals for examinations of individual plays, comparative and cross-cultural approaches, as well as gender and material-oriented perspectives. 

150-word abstracts, together with a one-page CV (indicating current affiliation and a valid email address) can be sent by July 15, 2020 to Aurélie Griffin : aurelie.griffin@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr

Tags:  Closet Drama  Material Studies  Performing Arts and Theater  Women and Gender 

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Althusser's Renaissance

Posted By Martin Moraw, Saturday, June 13, 2020

Louis Althusser’s thought is receiving renewed attention in the humanities and social sciences. This session seeks to bring together scholars of various disciplines and specializations to explore the potential of a return to Althusser in the particular context of Renaissance/early modern studies. Contributions may reflect on Althusser’s writings on early modern figures, make use of Althusserian concepts to produce new readings of early modern texts, or engage relevant theoretical questions.

Topics may include: Althusser, Machiavelli, politics; Althusser, Galileo, science; Althusser, Spinoza, philosophy; structure, conjuncture, contradiction, overdetermination, uneven development; Althusser and theater; symptomatic reading; ideology, subjectivation; aleatory materialism, the encounter.

Please send proposals including a paper title, an abstract (200 words), and a one-paragraph CV to Martin Moraw (martin.moraw@aucegypt.edu) by July 31, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy 

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Patronage and innovation: how patronage shaped textual culture in the early modern world

Posted By Annet den Haan, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Studying patronage is crucial for understanding the early modern world. Indeed, recent scholarship on patronage covers the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, it studies countries as diverse as Italy and the Dutch Republic, and it focuses on artifacts ranging from scientific theses to funerary poems, from paintings to coins. Although scholars of patronage occasionally cross borders between countries, genres, or time periods, we believe we can bring scholarship a step further by comparing contexts systematically to uncover underlying mechanisms. In this panel, we focus on textual patronage, by which we mean patronage of clients (authors, editors, printers) who produce texts of any kind.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how textual patronage relates to the client’s intellectual and artistic freedom, and hence to originality and innovation. In which cases are authors free to create something new? Does economic or social success lead to more autonomy? Is patronage a stimulus for innovation, or does it prevent authors from being innovative? In other words, is patronage limiting or liberating? The question of what causes innovation is one of the points of focus within the interdisciplinary field of the history of knowledge, and several tentative explanations have been suggested. By focusing on patronage relations, we add another perspective to this debate.

Our aim is to compare case studies of patronage across regions, periods, communities, ideologies, and genres, in order to draw tentative conclusions about patronage in relation to intellectual and artistic freedom. We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. We intend to make the panel a collaborative effort and would like to discuss in advance with all presenters which specific questions we will all answer, in order to systematically study the mechanisms of innovation in textual products of patronage.

Submission guidelines

Interested participants are invited to submit the following:

  • a 400-word abstract as well as a 150-word short version
  • a curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address; max. 5 pages
  • paper keywords.

Please send all materials to Annet den Haan (a.denhaan@uu.nl) and to Nina Geerdink (n.geerdink@uu.nl). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America. Please not that RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Music  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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CFP: Teaching Renaissance Drama in a Digital World

Posted By Rachel E. Wifall, Saturday, May 23, 2020
Updated: Saturday, May 23, 2020

Deadline: 15 July 2020

The study of Renaissance drama can be difficult for students at all levels, as they need to become comfortable with unfamiliar language composed in verse, as well as come to understand action largely without stage directions. While learning about Renaissance drama in a classroom or on a stage is challenging enough, the necessity for remote learning has posed new challenges for instructors and students. While the digital era has introduced us to tools which can be useful for the study of Renaissance drama, the COVID19 pandemic has forced us to become creative and utilize them. Papers are welcome which consider any aspect of teaching Renaissance drama in the digital age (not confined to English), whether as literature or performance, including acting and stagecraft. 

Proposals should include an abstract (no longer than 150 words) and an academic c.v., emailed to Rachel Wifall (rwifall@saintpeters.edu) by 15 July 2020.

Tags:  Performing Arts and Theater 

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Call for Papers: Sidney Circle at RSA Dublin 2021

Posted By The International Sidney Association, Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Deadline: 1 August 2020

The International Sidney Association plans to sponsor four new sessions at the 66th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Dublin. We invite papers on any and all topics related to Philip Sidney, Mary Sidney Herbert, Lady Mary Wroth, the Sidney Family or the Sidney Circle generally. That Circle is conceived broadly, and hence we would welcome papers not only about Fulke Greville, Samuel Daniel, and William Herbert, but also papers about Giordano Bruno, Veronica Franco, Philippe Duplessis-Mornay, Justus Lipsius, and any number of figures in the Circle’s large cosmopolitan network.

We would be particularly happy to receive paper proposals on (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • The Sidneys in Ireland
  • Women Writers of the Sidney Circle
  • Politics, History, Religion in the Sidney Circle
  • Philip Sidney and the Early Moderns Post-1586 (Sidney and Shakespeare, or Sidney and Spenser, or Herbert or Donne or Daniel or Drayton, etc.)

Proposals should include an abstract (no longer than 150 words), a brief academic C.V. (not longer than 300 words). Indicate too whether you will require A.V. equipment for the presentation. Please email your proposals to Rob Stillman (rstillma@utk.edu) by 1 August 2020.

PS—In addition, the International Sidney Association plans to offer several more panels originally planned for RSA 2020 in Philadelphia. Participants on those panels should contact me for more information.

Tags:  Associate Organizations  English Literature  Performing Arts and Theater 

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