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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

CfP: Andrea Cesalpino (1519–1603), a Physician, Philosopher, and Botanist in Renaissance Italy

Posted By RSA, Monday, July 20, 2020

As his activities intersect, and innovatively shape various fields, Andrea Cesalpino was a key figure in Renaissance culture. Alongside with his work as a professor of botany and medicine at the University of Pisa, where he directed the botanical garden, and as a professor of medicine in Rome and a personal physician to Pope Clemente VIII, Cesalpino’s writings testify to a largely innovative approach to natural philosophy.

For example, his philosophical work, Quaestionum peripateticarum libri V (1569) provides an Aristotelian perspective with traces of Averroes. In his medical texts, Cesalpino reveals important insights in the aspects of blood circulation. In De plantis libri XVI (1583), he crucially frames botanical studies within an Aristotelian architecture, laying down the foundation of plant morphology and physiology of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Yet, he also focused on magic in Daemonum investigation (1580) and metallurgy in De metallis (1596).

While these texts are well-known by specialists, a more complete investigation of Cesalpino as a whole is missing in recent scholarship. In this panel, we aim to explore Cesalpino’s work in detail, unearthing the importance of his studies in different fields and discussing Cesalpino as a major figure in Renaissance knowledge. While the inspection of Cesalpino’s work per se lags behind, and thus the aim of this panel is to fill a gap in scholarship, investigating the debates over Cesalpino’s in the sixteenth century and the reception and presence of Cesalpino in the early modern time suits the scope of the panel.

Proposals for the panel should be sent to fabrizio.baldassarri@gmail.com by the end of July 2020 and should contain a 15-word title, an abstract of 150-word maximum (word count is mandatory!), max 5 page cv, PhD or other terminal degree completion date (past or expected), and full name, affiliation, email address.

The panel is sponsored by the RSA Discipline Representative for Medicine and Science.

Tags:  Humanism  Medicine and Science  Philosophy 

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Gendered Sins: Vices in Spanish Literature in the Light of Moral and Medical Casuistry

Posted By Marlen Bidwell-Steiner, Friday, July 17, 2020

Early Modern Spanish imaginary literature very often yields a peculiar economy of violation and punishment. Some perpetrators get through without sanctions; apparently innocent protagonists become suspects and consequently victims in a disturbing system of "poetic justice"; and yet others have to accept an unrewarding settlement to restore the social order. In Spanish literature, honor or honra are the markers for male social integrity, whereas shame sticks primarily to the female body. Thus, the performed imaginary sanctions are deeply gendered. Yet, they are not mere mimetic reproductions of the norms and rules imposed by religious and/or secular power: they rather negotiate gaps between conflicting (or even superseded) ideas within Post-Tridentine society. Such negotiations intertwine with and echo the debates in other prominent textual genres of the time: manuals of confession and philosophical and medical treatises referring to the Querelle des femmes (or better: Querelle des sexes).

This panel will investigate such negotiations of the specific gendered nature of vices in novels, novellas, comedias on the one hand and penitential and theoretical texts on the other. Differing approaches and incongruent perceptions of honor and self-esteem may help to detect the (re)shaping of subjectivity and the gender regimes of a society in change.

We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history to submit papers. Please send proposals via email with the subject line “Casuistry Dublin” to marlen.bidwell-steiner@univie.ac.at by 5 August 2020. The proposal should include a title (15 words max.); an abstract (200 words max.); and a short CV with full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Tags:  Casuistry  Hispanic Literature  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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The 'I' in the Margins: Poetry, Memoirs, Letters and Paratexts by Reformed exiles

Posted By Clara Marías, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 15, 2020

In the last decades, increasing attention has been paid to the works written or translated by Reformed exiles during the 16th and 17th centuries. From a European perspective, the monographies published by the members of the research group EMoDiR are a good example, and on the Spanish reformed exiles, scholars such as Carlos Gilly, Massimo Firpo, Ignacio García Pinilla, Doris Moreno, James Amelang, or Rady Roldán-Figueroa have edited and studied several works, expanding our knowledge about them. However, these translations and original writings from Juan de Valdés, Francisco de Enzina, Juan Pérez de Pineda, Casiodoro de Reina, Antonio del Corro, Tomás Carrascón, Nicolás y Sacharles, among others, have been studied from the perspective of History or History of Religion, rather than as literary works and often without a focus on their self-fashioning perspective and the ideological and political intentions of the authors.

For this reason, this panel invites proposals from scholars interested in analyzing the poetry, memoirs, letters and paratexts (introductions, dedicatory epistles, etc.) from Reformed exiles, dealing with the manners in which the authors, far from their countries and often persecuted and in danger, living “in the margins”, presented their lives and ideas and their faith and conversion by means of various rhetorical strategies, including dissimulation, persuasion, fictionalization or confrontation.

The proposals should study works by reformed exiles from any European country with a Catholic majority during the Early Modern period, with a literary approach to the poetry, memoirs, letters, prologues and dedicatory epistles selected for discussion.

Interested participants should send the following in a single document to Clara Marías (cmarias@us.es) by August 7, 2020:

  • Paper title
  • A single page CV
  • Abstract (about 500 words)

Tags:  Cultural Networks  Diaries  emotional history  European history  European literature  exile  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italy  Literature  memoirs  Memory Studies  Networks  Philosophy  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Rhetoric  self-fashioning  Spanish literature  translation 

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Reframing the Paragone: New Approaches to a Comparative Method of Artistic Analysis

Posted By Stefano Colombo, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Scholars have dealt at great length with the notion of paragone from the early modern period onwards. In art criticism, paragone is a technical jargon generally used to refer to the similarity between two things (for example artistic media) through the act of comparison. Because it involves the analogy between one thing and another, paragone invokes a comparative meter through which artistic practice is judged or recognized. Significantly, art historians have often resorted to paragone to refer to the competition of the arts, most notably painting and sculpture or poetry and painting. Although this interpretation of paragone is not unsubstantiated, recent scholarship has clarified that the actual meaning of paragone is much broader (Dempsey 2009; van Gastel et al. 2014; Nygren 2017). Going beyond the quarrel over the nobility of the arts, paragone implies the dialogic mode of reasoning typical of a debate, where both sides of an argument are discussed by means of a disputation (Dempsey 2009). This interpretation, which traces its roots in classical rhetoric and was revived in the Renaissance, has reshaped the notion of paragone as the basis of formal academic debate which is fundamental to all the arts and sciences.

This panel invites to reflect on paragone as a comparative method of visual analysis in the early modern period (ca. 1300-1700). In what ways does the flexible meaning of paragone help us reconsider the sources that laid the foundations of paragone itself, such as Benedetto Varchi or Leonardo da Vinci? Is paragone a fabrication of historiography, or was it already in effect in the Renaissance? Especially welcomed are papers that address paragone during Mannerism and the Baroque period. This is the moment when paragone entered the artistic debate of accademie, the learned societies whose members were erudite of various disciplines encompassing the visual arts, literature, law and philosophy. How did paragone influence artistic discourse in the accademie? And how did the exchange of ideas among members of these accademie inform on the production and reception of different art forms?

Topics of interest might include but are not limited to: interaction among different media, in particular, sculpture, architecture and literature; ekphrasis and visual rhetoric; the extent to which artists (and their patrons) relied on technical, scientific or theological formulations and how these influenced the making and reception of artworks; or the analysis of the dialogic mode of paragone through the analogy between the liberal arts and other branches of knowledge, such as the natural sciences, medicine or theology.

Please send an abstract (150-word maximum), a paper title (15-word maximum), 3-5 keywords, academic affiliation, PhD completion date (past or expected), a brief curriculum vitae, and any audio/visual requirements to Stefano Colombo (stefano.colombo.365@gmail.com) by August 8, 2020.

Tags:  Accademie  Art and Architecture  Art Theory  Classical Tradition  Ekphrasis  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Literature  Paragone  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture  Rhetoric  Sculpture  Transmediality 

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Experiencing Death in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Ariana Ellis, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

Death saturates early modern Italian culture, from Dance of Death artwork and religious scripture to elaborate execution processions and the scaffold literature they inspired. But what did it mean to experience death? How did it look, sound, and feel? Where did the boundaries between life and death truly lie?

 

This panel is seeking papers that explore what it meant to experience death in Italy at any point during the early modern period. Analytical perspectives including: the senses, the emotions, philosophy, memorial culture, death culture, and art history are all welcome.

 

Please send proposals to the organizer (ariana.ellis@mail.utoronto.ca) by July 27th. Paper proposals must include:

 

·      Abstract (150 word maximum)

·      Paper title (15 word maximum)

·      Full name, current affiliation, and email address

·      CV (.pdf or .doc; 5 page maximum)

·      Date of PhD or terminal degree completion

       (past or expected)

 

Selected applicants will be notified as soon as possible. Please note- you must renew or activate an RSA membership to participate in the conference.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  death and gender  Death studies  Digital Humanities  emotional history  Florence  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  Memory Studies  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Sensory history  Sound studies  Urban Studies  Venice 

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Materials of the Body – Materials of the Painting

Posted By Maria F. Hansen, Thursday, July 2, 2020

Ideas of correspondences between the substances of the human body, the materials of the earth and cosmos can be traced back to ancient philosophy. In the early modern period, these affinities blurred the lines between doctors, alchemists and artists, who shared a capacity to expose, transform or improve matter. These parallels contributed to numerous analogical representations within the visual arts, where the practices and materials of the artist were associated with living matter and the creative forces of nature and life.

This panel addresses this exchange as it took place before modern scientific distinctions between objective explanations and artistic interpretations of the world and its materials. This also entails a collapse of any sharp distinction between organic and inorganic matter, which we instead invite to be seen as perceptually entangled. Recent developments in the understanding of the human body, matter and its embeddedness in the world strengthens the relevance of exploring these themes in the early modern period.

We welcome papers that explore the interpretations of materials and their consequence within visual culture. What were the intersections between representations used by artists and scientists? How did the exchange between alchemy, medical science and art take place? Can a historical perspective on art and science and a critical focus on the exchange between the disciplines shed new light on singular artworks or artists? Topics might include alchemical or scientific imagery; intersections between cosmetics and painting; alchemical and artistic practices; history and the understanding of paint and pigments; medical illustrations; artistic materials’ association with the body and its organs; artist’s handling of stone (painted marble, artificial grottoes, decorative art, etc).

Interested participants should send a paper title, abstract (150 words max), a short CV, and A/V requirements to the session organizers Maria Fabricius Hansen at mfhansen@hum.ku.dk, Signe Havsteen at signehavsteen@hum.ku.dk, and Lejla Mrgan at lejla@hum.ku.dk. All presenters must register for the Annual Renaissance Society of America Meeting. The deadline for submission of materials to this panel is July 29, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Bodies  Cosmetics and Painting  Dissection  History of Science  Italian Renaissance Art  Magic  Materials and Materiality  Medicine and Science  Philosophy 

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Call for Papers: Giordano Bruno, Theologian

Posted By Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (SMRP), Wednesday, June 24, 2020

The Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy requests submissions for panels to be held at the RSA's Dublin 2021 (7-10 April) meeting on the topic: 'Giordano Bruno, Theologian'

During his wanderings through Europe in the 1580s, Giordano Bruno famously announced himself to the world as a philosopher. He published numerous philosophical works, taught philosophy at several Catholic and Protestant universities, and regaled acquaintances and strangers alike with, in the words of one member of his erstwhile order, ‘the fantastic, bizarre things of his invention’. Yet, by vocation, Bruno was a friar. He had entered the Dominican monastery of San Domenico Maggiore in Naples as a novice in 1565, been ordained as a priest in 1572 and obtained a doctorate in theology in 1575.

This early phase of his intellectual career left its mark on what he called his ‘new philosophy’, for all that it contradicted Christian doctrine at almost every turn. His surviving works cite and allude to Scripture repeatedly, discuss God’s triune nature, invoke the Scriptual idea of the angels announcing God’s glory to describe the celestial bodies populating the infinite universe, and present Bruno himself as the saviour of souls, to mention just a few instances of their continuous recourse to Christian doctrine and themes.

If you would like to give a paper exploring this aspect of Bruno’s philosophy, please submit a proposal, via email, to Dilwyn Knox (d.knox@ucl.ac.uk) by Monday, 27 July, 2020. Your proposal should include your name, academic affiliation, email address, the title of your paper, an abstract of no more than 200 words, and a (very) brief CV or, if more convenient, a link to an online CV or the equivalent.

Tags:  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Religion  theology 

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“Otium cum dignitate”. Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

Posted By Cristina Agüero, Friday, June 19, 2020
Updated: Saturday, June 20, 2020

“Otium cum dignitate”.

Leisure and amusement of Early Modern elites.

CFP | RSA Dublin 2021, April 7-10

 

 

The concept of “otium cum dignitate” –fruitful leisure in opposition to idleness– present in Cicero’s texts was restored by the Humanism and pervaded the noble culture from 15th to 17th centuries. “If you have a garden and a library” –wrote Cicero to his friend Varrone– “you have everything you need” (Epistulae ad Familiares IX, 4). The model of the Renaissance ville formulated by architects such as Sangallo and Palladio responded to this ideal by reflecting the principles of Vitruvio’s treatise De architectura. This revival of the antique forms implied the assumption of the ideals of decorum (adequation of the house to the social rank and public role of its proprietary) and magnificence as a sign of distinction. Consequently, the garden, the gallery and the library were core elements inside the dwellings of early modern patricians. These places not only played an essential function within the strategies of representation and construction of the family memory but also served as a scenario for the “conspicuous leisure” (as named by Veblen in The Theory of the Leisure Class) distinctive of the elites. Art collecting, gardening, and amateur writing, painting or drawing were common practices among early modern nobles and sovereigns, who found shelter from melancholy –the disease of the soul– in the rarities of the cabinets, the beauties of the galleries and the amenities of the gardens (teeming with fountains, sculptures, exotic plants, fruits and animals). They hosted intellectuals and artist to amuse themselves with the art of conversation, commenting poems or discussing the stories represented in the paintings they gathered. The theater performances, banquets and concerts celebrated by members of the political and ecclesiastical elites –often in honor of foreign visitors– evinced the performative and political dimensions of some forms of “otium”.

 

This panel aims to examine various aspects of the leisure events and activities cultivated by the early modern elites; considering their cultural, symbolical and political implications, the venues (ville, family palaces, libraries, galleries, banqueting houses, gardens, etc.) where they took place, and the artifacts and artistic creations (books, poems, plays, paintings, etc.) used or produced in these places. Studies on the cultural networks that thrive on the idea of “otium” (like the Accademia degli oziosi) and presentations concerning the concept of leisure and the criticism articulated thereon by moralists and arbitristas are also desirable.

 

We welcome proposals by researchers from every humanistic discipline –including history of art, history, philosophy and literature– at any career stage. Those interested in participating in this panel are requested to submit an abstract (no more than 300 words) and a short academic bio to cristina.aguero@ub.edu by July 31

 

*Please note that all speakers must become RSA members in order to present their papers at the conference.

 
Organizer: Cristina Agüero (Universidad de Barcelona).

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Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Cultural Networks  Galleries  Gardens  Humanism  Leisure  Libraries  Literature  Material Culture  Nobility  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Poetry  Sculpture  Villa 

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Mining for the Earth-Based Sciences

Posted By Katie Jakobiec, Thursday, June 18, 2020

Organizers: Stefano Gulizia (PAN, Warsaw); Katie Jakobiec (University of Toronto)

This panel is sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS), University of Toronto, for the 67th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, to be held in Dublin, Ireland, on 7-10 April 2021. We warmly invite submissions and hope to select 3-4 papers for presentation according to the following outline.

Between 1450 and 1650, in the aftermath of a great technological change in metallurgy, a vast Central European space including centres such as Trento, Chemnitz, and Goslar specialized and clustered into new industrial hubs. In our historiography of the period, as well, mining has emerged as a nexus for studying the interface between natural history, physiology, and the processing of materials. Thanks to Anna Marie Roos’s The Salt of the Earth (Brill 2007) and Laboratories of Art, edited by Sven Dupré (Springer 2014), to name only a few contributions, we have a refined understanding of how this artisanal knowledge related to alchemy and philosophy. More recently, a special issue of Renaissance Studies (34.1: 2019) edited by Tina Asmussen and Pamela O. Long undertook the ambitious and impressive task of accounting for Berggeschrey, or ‘mountain uproar’ in all its technological, legal, textual, and symbolic features, including the core ambivalence of ethnographic collections up to the new histories of labor in a reunited Germany.

By design, our session assigns a premium on epistemic practices over the two major viewpoints adopted by historians, namely folklore and socio-economic development. Overall, we would like to see the Renaissance mine and its paperwork as a concrete example of Hans-Jörg Rheinberger’s laboratory, and how objects appear and disappear, or perhaps, move from being merely ordinary to epistemic. Another larger outlook of this project is environmental. Paracelsus already endowed subterranean things with an enduring, palingenetic power which was then developed within an experimental framework; both James Delbourgo and Philippa Hellawell argued for a substantial yet persuasive extension of the domain of mining to include seascapes and submarine knowledge.

Given all this, and without pretenses to limit the analysis only to these points, we propose that:

  • the morphing of sites of extraction into sites of connectivity is potentially problematic; likewise, it is difficult to constraint the sheer variety of actors and agencies at a mine into the concept of a “trading zone” in which not everyone was “trading” (e.g. some were ‘accounting for’, others ‘enslaved to’, and so on). Could we improve on our metaphorical usage? In this regard, Renée Raphael’s 2019 essay in RS offers a valuable model of how the current ‘practical’ view of the trading zone hides a heavy reliance on textual learning.
  • there is a relation between cartographic curiosity and mining that still awaits to be fully explored, and this means dealing with maps, sections, landscapes, and representations of specimens. For example, we couldn’t find any reference in English-speaking scholarship to the Delineatio Wielicensis of 1645, that is, the map of the massive salt mine of Wieliczka, outside Cracow, in the context of the Polish scientific book of the seventeenth-century. How do we assess mining with regard to visual representation in earth sciences histories? Could we profitably turn to the tradition of geodesy and its instruments? And does the cartographic imagination link mining to topography, territoriality, and the military arts?
  • as a corollary to the last point, and because of our typical reliance on tacit or vernacular learning within an interdisciplinary-oriented history of knowledge, issues of mobility and redeployment have completely overwhelmed the traditional framework of geology, seen as the birth of a “new” science. Yet, there is still a lot to be gained from the longue durée of fifteenth-century artisanal humanism, as Ivano Dal Prete has stressed. We simply suggest that we need better studies of how mining relates to epistemic images of “deep time;” and to remind ourselves that even rocks and fossils were aligned to anatomical exercises.
  • so far, almost the entirety of our case studies came from the German-speaking world, which, in point of fact, has become synonymous with research on Renaissance mining. There is, however, an untapped wealth of materials pertaining to Italy, the Czech Republic, Poland-Lithuania, and the colonial Iberian experience. How would the ensuing picture differ? And how did the historical actors consider these lesser-studied mining towns as a built environment? Did an enviro-technical site function more like a networked object?

The deadline is July 15, 2020; notification of acceptance will come within 15 days after that date. To apply please: 1) submit an abstract of no more than 250 words, describing your proposal, and a 150-word narrative CV, which would serve as a basis for introducing you; 2) explicitly confirm proof of, or plan to obtain, a RSA membership; and 3) send all this as a single attachment to both organizers, at sgulizia@gmail.com and katie.jakobiec@utoronto.ca

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Artillery  Classical Tradition  Humanism  Legal and Political Thought  Material Culture  Materiality  Medicine and Science  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture 

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Althusser's Renaissance

Posted By Martin Moraw, Saturday, June 13, 2020

Louis Althusser’s thought is receiving renewed attention in the humanities and social sciences. This session seeks to bring together scholars of various disciplines and specializations to explore the potential of a return to Althusser in the particular context of Renaissance/early modern studies. Contributions may reflect on Althusser’s writings on early modern figures, make use of Althusserian concepts to produce new readings of early modern texts, or engage relevant theoretical questions.

Topics may include: Althusser, Machiavelli, politics; Althusser, Galileo, science; Althusser, Spinoza, philosophy; structure, conjuncture, contradiction, overdetermination, uneven development; Althusser and theater; symptomatic reading; ideology, subjectivation; aleatory materialism, the encounter.

Please send proposals including a paper title, an abstract (200 words), and a one-paragraph CV to Martin Moraw (martin.moraw@aucegypt.edu) by July 31, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy 

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Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, June 11, 2020

Call for Papers, Renaissance Society of America Conference, Dublin, Ireland, April 7-10, 2021

The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) is has announced that it will accept proposals for individual presentation proposals and complete panels for its 2021 annual conference, to be held April 7-10, 2021 in Dublin, Ireland.  The Journal of Jesuit Studies regularly sponsors up to five panels at this conference.  We are looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700.  (Please note: Sponsorship by the JJS does not guarantee acceptance to the program.)

Please submit abstracts on topics related to Jesuits on the subjects of: history, literary studies, art history, music history, or related topics, of no more than 150 words, along with a short list of keywords, and a BRIEF CV (no more than 300 words, including affiliation, rank and one or two important publications or other evidence of scholarship) to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 1, 2020.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.

Further information about the RSA, the Dublin conference, and the general Call for Papers is available at https://www.rsa.org/page/RSADublin2021.

 

Thank you.

Kathleen M. Comerford
Professor of History, Georgia Southern University

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Tags:  Africa  Art and Architecture  Art History  Asia  Comparative Literature  Education  French Empire  History  Jesuits  Missions  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Portuguese Empire  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire 

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Magical Materials

Posted By Rebekah T. Compton, Wednesday, June 10, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Magical Materials

Dublin, Ireland, April 7-10, 2021

The theory of natural or astral magic is based on the belief that God emanates powers through the spheres of the planets and the fixed stars, down to earth, and into its matter. In Marsilio Ficino’s Three Books on Life and in the Picatrix, the word virtue—a term derived from the Latin word vis or power—is employed to describe the investment of celestial agency into terrestrial matter. This session seeks to examine the occult or secret virtues believed to be contained within materials and the use of these materials in image-based, natural, astral, and theurgic forms of magic.

A material's spiritual potency could be enhanced through the use of inscriptions, symbols, rituals, suffumigations, and/or prayers. Moreover, illicit materials—including human body parts and fluids— could be wielded for maleficent forms of sorcery. This panel invites papers addressing magical materials in the early modern period. Topics might include celestial likenesses and talismans; petitions for love, fertility, or childbirth; perfumes and pharmacology; ritual performances; representations of magical practices; sympathetic resonances and the soul's ascent; or the writings of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, Marsilio Ficino, the Picatrix, Hermes Trismegistus, or Iamblichus.

Please send a paper title, abstract (150 words max), a short CV, and A/V requirements to the session organizer Rebekah Compton at rebekahcompton@gmail.com. All presenters must register for the Annual Renaissance Society of America Meeting. The deadline for submission of materials to this panel is July 29, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  English Literature  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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Patronage and innovation: how patronage shaped textual culture in the early modern world

Posted By Annet den Haan, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Studying patronage is crucial for understanding the early modern world. Indeed, recent scholarship on patronage covers the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, it studies countries as diverse as Italy and the Dutch Republic, and it focuses on artifacts ranging from scientific theses to funerary poems, from paintings to coins. Although scholars of patronage occasionally cross borders between countries, genres, or time periods, we believe we can bring scholarship a step further by comparing contexts systematically to uncover underlying mechanisms. In this panel, we focus on textual patronage, by which we mean patronage of clients (authors, editors, printers) who produce texts of any kind.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how textual patronage relates to the client’s intellectual and artistic freedom, and hence to originality and innovation. In which cases are authors free to create something new? Does economic or social success lead to more autonomy? Is patronage a stimulus for innovation, or does it prevent authors from being innovative? In other words, is patronage limiting or liberating? The question of what causes innovation is one of the points of focus within the interdisciplinary field of the history of knowledge, and several tentative explanations have been suggested. By focusing on patronage relations, we add another perspective to this debate.

Our aim is to compare case studies of patronage across regions, periods, communities, ideologies, and genres, in order to draw tentative conclusions about patronage in relation to intellectual and artistic freedom. We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. We intend to make the panel a collaborative effort and would like to discuss in advance with all presenters which specific questions we will all answer, in order to systematically study the mechanisms of innovation in textual products of patronage.

Submission guidelines

Interested participants are invited to submit the following:

  • a 400-word abstract as well as a 150-word short version
  • a curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address; max. 5 pages
  • paper keywords.

Please send all materials to Annet den Haan (a.denhaan@uu.nl) and to Nina Geerdink (n.geerdink@uu.nl). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America. Please not that RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Music  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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Sponsored session: Poetry, Science, and Disciplinary Boundaries in the Italian Renaissance

Posted By Francesco Brenna, Tuesday, June 9, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2020

This will be a session sponsored by the disciplinary area of Italian Literature for the next Renaissance Society of America annual meeting (Dublin, Ireland, 7-10 April 2021). NB: there is the possibility that the RSA meeting will be held virtually: panelists should be prepared to present online.

This panel aims to examine how literary and scientific culture looked at each other in order to define their respective disciplinary limits in the Italian early modern period. How did literature react to the dawn of the new science? What precisely were the ways literature used to define its specific contribution to human learning? Was it able to delineate that which could only be learned through poems and fiction? How did science deal with the same issues when defining and placing itself within a system dominated by what we now call the humanities? To answer these questions, this panel invites papers on early modern Italian (or Italian-related) vernacular and Latin texts, including but not limited to:

  • theoretical texts (treatises on poetry, science, pedagogy, and commentaries on classical texts);
  • literary works conveying scientific notions of various kinds (e.g., pathology in Fracastoro's Syphilis sive de morbo gallico, geographical and hydrological information in Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata, and especially Gerusalemme conquistata, anatomy in Marino's Adone, and new inventions, observations on nature, and discoveries, such as those described in works by Daniello Bartoli and Giacomo Lubrano);
  • intellectuals whose output lies at the intersection of science, poetics, and philosophy, such as Galileo, Tesauro, Campanella, and Bruno.

Please send paper proposals to Francesco Brenna (fbrenna4@alumni.jh.edu) by 22 July 2020, including:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Decisions on submissions will be communicated soon after the deadline, and before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

Tags:  Bartoli  Bruno  Campanella  Comparative Literature  Fracastoro  Galileo  Marino  Medicine and Science  pedagogy  Philosophy  poetics  poetry  Rhetoric  Tasso  Tesauro 

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CfP: Sponsored Sessions, Discipline of Philosophy

Posted By Sara Miglietti, Monday, June 8, 2020

Call for Papers
Discipline of Philosophy

Renaissance Society of America 2021 Dublin
7–10 April 2021

The Discipline of Philosophy invites submissions for sessions at the next annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Dublin (which may be on site or virtual). Please send proposals for FULLY-FORMED panels or roundtables on any subject appropriate to our discipline. We especially welcome submissions on the following topics:

  • Debates over the disciplinary boundaries of philosophy and its relationship with other fields (e.g. medicine, rhetoric, theology), 14C–17C
  • Women in Renaissance philosophy (as authors, readers, patrons, translators, etc. or as a topic of philosophical discussion)
  • Encounters between European philosophy and non-Western forms of thought, 14C–17C
  • Teaching Renaissance philosophy in the 21st century

All sessions must be organized by a current member of the Renaissance Society of America. Please send the following materials to Sara Miglietti (sara.miglietti@sas.ac.uk) by 15 July:

Panel Proposal (min 2, max 4 speakers)

  • panel title (15-word maximum)
  • a 1-2 page description of the panel
  • any audio-visual requests
  • panel chair
  • respondent (optional for three-paper panels, required for panels with only two presenters)

Each paper presenter must provide:

  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • discipline area
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc, no longer than 5 pages)
  • PhD or other terminal degree completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

Roundtable Proposal (min. 4, max 8 discussants)

  • session title (15-word maximum)
  • a 1-2 page description of the roundtable
  • session abstract (150-word maximum)
  • discipline area
  • discussants (min. 4, max. 8)
  • any audio-visual requests
  • session chair
  • current email addresses for all participants

Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

Notes

  • No dual submissions please. RSA rules allow a participant to presentonly one paper. A dual submission could lead to the cancellation of an entire panel.
  • Sessions composed entirely of graduate students will not be considered, in keeping with RSA policy. Graduate students should be doctoral candidates within one or two years of defending their dissertations.

Tags:  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Rhetoric 

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