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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Figures of Polyglossia in British Early Modern Culture

Posted By Agnes Lafont, Monday, July 20, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

This panel, which is part of the “Translation and Polyglossia” project (https://tape1617.hypotheses.org/), wishes to explore ways in which polyglossia is inscribed textually as well as pictorially in early modern books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and other ephemera. It aims at investigating how common European knowledge was not only translated but adapted and naturalized in English book history. Emblems, woodcuts, engravings, broadsheets, dictionaries, and annotated or edited material in which several languages are co-present on the page may serve as examples. How was polyglossia made visible and marketed in early modern Britain? How did the figuration of polyglossia help transmit knowledge in a specific manner?

The study of the representation of polyglossia will interrogate:

  • The respective roles of various languages on the page
  • The different relationships to auctoritas that the use of a language other than English may induce (through the use of quotations, the reuse of engravings and woodcuts, etc.)
  • The functioning of a moving hermeneutics by an author (who imagines her or his text in various languages), by a reader (who annotates or makes comments in the margins)
  • The sociology of milieus who are conversant in several languages, have a shared erudition, use coded language, hieroglyphs...

Topics for consideration include:

  • annotated books and manuscripts
  • emblem books
  • polyglot dictionaries
  • polyglot documents produced by women
  • documents of performance
  • broadside ballads
  • pamphlets, periodicals, and ephemera

All types of documents may be brought to the discussion as long as they circulated in the British Isles in the early modern period, including books not printed in England but with attested circulations.

Please submit the following materials to organizers Agnès Lafont (agnes.lafont@univ-montp3.fr) and Laetitia Sansonetti (l.sansonetti@parisnanterre.fr) by August 7th to be considered for inclusion: paper title (15 words maximum); abstract (150 words maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300 words maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  Emblems  English Literature  European literature  Literature  Material Culture  Multilingualism  Print  translation 

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Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater

Posted By Luca Zipoli, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, July 14, 2020

“Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater”

Organizer: Luca Zipoli (Scuola Normale Superiore), luca.zipoli@sns.it

Chair: Laura Benedetti (Georgetown University)

ABSTRACT: Torquato Tasso encountered an extraordinary fortune between the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 18th thanks to his epic masterpiece, La Gerusalemme liberata (Jerusalem delivered). During the Renaissance and then the Baroque era, the poem was read, appreciated, and commented upon, but it also enjoyed many forms of adaptations through a vast range of visual arts and media, from illustrated printed editions to operas, from paintings and frescoes to theatrical plays. This panel aims to investigate, through a multidisciplinary and trans-cultural approach, this multidimensional phenomenon by examining some of the newly discovered and most relevant case studies of the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata, from the Cinquecento up to c. 1700. The theoretical framework of this panel will be rooted in the up-to-date paradigms of the “adaptation studies” (e.g. Thomas Leitch et alii 2020, Linda Hutcheon 2013, Julie Sanders 2005), and we will seek to respond to some of these questions: which features made Tasso’s poem such a rich source for creative re-elaborations? What do the multifaceted appropriations of La Gerusalemme tell us about the Baroque aesthetics and the various cultures that inspired them? How can the studies on Tasso’s reception contribute to the general field of adaptation studies? The aim of this panel is to present scarcely known or neglected cases within the long tradition of adaptations from Tasso, while shedding a new light on more frequent themes through cutting-edge interpretations and a new theoretical benchmark.

This panel invites paper proposals which may include but are in no way limited to:

  • illustrated printed editions of La Gerusalemme liberata (e.g. the editions Castello 1590, 1604, and 1617, Ruffinelli 1607, and Tozzi 1628);
  • paintings, drawings, and artworks inspired by the epic poem (e.g. the cases of Annibale Carracci, Nicolas Poussin, and Antoon van Dyck);
  • theatrical, music, and operatic adaptations of Tasso’s masterpiece (e.g. the works by Giaches de Wert, Claudio Monteverdi, and Giulio Rospigliosi);

Please send paper proposals to Luca Zipoli (luca.zipoli@sns.it) by 10 August 2020. The submissions must include:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc, no longer than 5 pages);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Book History  Italian Literature  Music  Performing Arts and Theater  Print  Reception Theory  Tasso  Visual Studies 

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Lists in Early Modern Women’s Writing: Life and Literature *extended deadline*

Posted By Nikolina Hatton, Friday, July 10, 2020
Updated: Monday, August 3, 2020

Lists proliferate in texts written by women and texts written about women, from the typical enumeration of “women worthies” within the querelle des femmes tradition to the lists of possessions and household accounts found in early modern commonplace books. Within women’s writing itself, functional everyday lists and literary lists sometimes merge, such as in Isabella Whitney’s “The Maner of her Wyll”—a poetic description of and reflection on London in the form of a Last Will and Testament.  

This panel seeks to reflect on the forms and functions of the list within early modern women’s writings and everyday lives. Literary studies has seen a recent resurgence of interest in the list, as scholars have noted the list’s ability to bring together questions of functionality and literariness. Scholars have shown that, as a form that deceptively appears simpler than it really is, the list and examinations of it shed light on the evolution and manipulation of literary conventions and can further signal important discursive distinctions between texts that at first feel otherwise quite similar. Such a project intersects well with the study of women’s writing in the early modern period, not only because lists appear so often in investigations into women’s everyday lives, but also because the corpus of literature by women is generally marked by subtle but significant deviations within the genres deemed acceptable for women writers. In material culture studies as well, the list has been hailed as an affordance for accomplishing everyday tasks as well as a container that emphasizes metonymy and materiality over metaphorical meanings. This panel seeks to open up these questions by broadly investigating the use of the list within early modern women’s utilitarian and literary writings.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send your paper’s title (max 15 words), a short abstract (150 words), your CV, and institutional affiliation/contact details to Nikolina Hatton (n.hatton@lmu.de) by 10 August 2020. A longer abstract may also be included in addition.

Tags:  Book History  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Daily Life  Diaries  Ekphrasis  English Literature  fiction  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Global Literature  History  interdiscplinary  Italian Literature  Libraries  Material Culture  Material Studies  Materiality  Memory Studies  networks  poetry  Portuguese Literature  Print  Spanish literature  Women and Gender 

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Emblem Studies

Posted By Tamar Cholcman, Friday, June 26, 2020

Call for Papers

Discipline of Emblems
Renaissance Society of America 2021
Dublin
7–10 April 2021

The Discipline of Emblem Studies invites papers and panels for its sessions at the annual meeting (which may be on site or virtual). We may submit up to four panels. We invite papers and panels on any subject appropriate to our discipline and especially welcome those that address the following:

  • New perspectives on the origins of emblems
  • The whole is greater than the sum of its parts: Exceptions to the tripartite emblem
  • Emblems of the Unknown: Utopia and the New World
  • Emblems and the Republic of Letters
  • Emblems and Cosmology
  • New perspective on emblem books
  • Practice and theory of emblem digitization.
  • Jesuit emblems (in memory of G. Richard Dimler)

Panels must be organized by a current member of the Renaissance Society of America. Panels should ordinarily include no more than three presenters.

Please submit the following:

  • A session title no longer than 15 words;
  • 150 word abstract for description of the panel;
  • 150 word abstract for each of its papers;
  • 300 word curriculum vitae for each presenter, including full name, affiliation, and email address;
  • any audiovisual requirements;
  • session keywords.

Papers may be submitted by anyone. Graduate students should be doctoral candidates (post prelims).

Please submit the following in a single Word document:

  • 150 word abstract of the paper;
  • 300 word curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address;
  • any audiovisual requirements;
  • paper keywords.

Send all materials to Tamar Cholcman (cholcman@tauex.tau.ac.il). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America.

Please note: RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Art History  Book History  Cultural Networks  Digital Humanities  Discipline Representatives  Emblem  Emblems  Humanism  Jesuits  Literature  Neo-Latin Literature  Print  Visual Studies 

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Fresh Ink: New Perspectives on Early Modern Print

Posted By Rachel M. Carlisle, Tuesday, June 23, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, June 23, 2020

The aim of this session is to highlight the current scholarship of PhD candidates and recent PhDs of early modern print. Papers engaging with new methodologies or objects of inquiry are especially encouraged. Our intention is to provide PhD candidates and recent PhDs an opportunity to share their fresh perspectives on the study of early modern print and receive constructive feedback from an international audience.

Per RSA guidelines, advanced graduate students submitting proposals for this panel must be within one or two years of defending their dissertations and should present dissertation-related research.

Proposals must include:

  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf, no longer than 5 pages)
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

Interested participants are invited to send their proposals to co-organizers Rachel M. Carlisle (rcarlisle@fsu.edu) and Lacy Gillette (lgillette@fsu.edu) by Wednesday, 15 July 2020. Decisions regarding acceptance will be provided at least one week prior to the 15 August deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 general submissions.

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Emerging Scholars  Print 

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