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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Milton, A General Session *extended deadline*

Posted By Eric B. Song, Thursday, July 23, 2020
Proposed papers may consider any aspect of the writings of John Milton; we especially welcome submissions from junior scholars.

Proposals should be sent to Eric Song, esong1@swarthmore.edu, by August 1 and include the following:

• full name, current affiliation, and email address

• paper title (15-word maximum), 

• abstract (150-word maximum), 

• curriculum vitae (no longer than 5 pages), 

• PhD or other terminal degree completion date (past or expected)

• if submitting a panel or roundtable proposal, a panel description (150-word maximum)


Tags:  English Literature  Literature  Religion 

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New Avenues for Processional Devotions

Posted By Mitzi Kirkland-Ives, Sunday, July 19, 2020

In the late medieval and early modern period a body of devotional practices emerged in which Christians engaged not only in contemplation of the episodes of the Passion and similar narratives but also in imaginative reenactment of those events: the Stations of the Cross in various forms, the Sorrows of the Virgin, the Falls of Christ, and related traditions. These devotions were often structured via passage from station to station across a real (or purely imagined) landscape, sometimes mapped out onto the preexisting landscape—urban streets, cloisters, church interiors—and sometimes supported by environments constructed for the purpose: Sacri monti, field chapels, and the like. This session seeks to highlight new contributions to this area of study in art history, literature, and other relevant fields of study; particularly welcome are contributions reflecting developments across a wide geographical scope including the Americas and less studied corners of Europe and the Mediterranean basin.

Please submit a title and 150 word abstract to Mitzi Kirkland-Ives (mkirklandives@missouristate.edu), as well as a two-page research c.v., by August 10, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Religion  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Visual Studies 

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The 'I' in the Margins: Poetry, Memoirs, Letters and Paratexts by Reformed exiles

Posted By Clara Marías, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 15, 2020

In the last decades, increasing attention has been paid to the works written or translated by Reformed exiles during the 16th and 17th centuries. From a European perspective, the monographies published by the members of the research group EMoDiR are a good example, and on the Spanish reformed exiles, scholars such as Carlos Gilly, Massimo Firpo, Ignacio García Pinilla, Doris Moreno, James Amelang, or Rady Roldán-Figueroa have edited and studied several works, expanding our knowledge about them. However, these translations and original writings from Juan de Valdés, Francisco de Enzina, Juan Pérez de Pineda, Casiodoro de Reina, Antonio del Corro, Tomás Carrascón, Nicolás y Sacharles, among others, have been studied from the perspective of History or History of Religion, rather than as literary works and often without a focus on their self-fashioning perspective and the ideological and political intentions of the authors.

For this reason, this panel invites proposals from scholars interested in analyzing the poetry, memoirs, letters and paratexts (introductions, dedicatory epistles, etc.) from Reformed exiles, dealing with the manners in which the authors, far from their countries and often persecuted and in danger, living “in the margins”, presented their lives and ideas and their faith and conversion by means of various rhetorical strategies, including dissimulation, persuasion, fictionalization or confrontation.

The proposals should study works by reformed exiles from any European country with a Catholic majority during the Early Modern period, with a literary approach to the poetry, memoirs, letters, prologues and dedicatory epistles selected for discussion.

Interested participants should send the following in a single document to Clara Marías (cmarias@us.es) by August 7, 2020:

  • Paper title
  • A single page CV
  • Abstract (about 500 words)

Tags:  Cultural Networks  Diaries  emotional history  European history  European literature  exile  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italy  Literature  memoirs  Memory Studies  Networks  Philosophy  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Rhetoric  self-fashioning  Spanish literature  translation 

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"Dante's Legacy in Renaissance Politics & Religion" (sponsored by Dante Society of America)

Posted By Aileen A. Feng, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 13, 2020

Organized by Erminia Ardissino (Università degli Studi di Torino), with Aileen A. Feng (University of Arizona; Dante Society of America's representative to RSA)

This panel intends to shed new, broader light on the use of Dante’s works in the religious turmoil of Renaissance Europe and the foundation of the early modern political world. While at the end of the fifteenth century in Florence the poet was wrongly believed to be the translator of seven penitential psalms and the author of a Credo, both of which were print successes running into several editions, his Comedy and political treatise De monarchia were later taken as examples of an anti-papal position, especially in the Reformed world and in heterodox circles. On the 700th anniversary of Dante's death, to be celebrated in 2021, this panel will explore the interpretation, editing, manipulation, and use of Dante’s writings in religious and/or political terms within the frame of European religious strife, when the poet’s ideas were used to support or attack various confessional identities. Moreover, we are interested in the use of his political works not only in religious controversies, but also in the process of founding a new political science as political autonomy from religion was sought.  In addition to papers focused on Italy, we particularly encourage projects dealing with the reception and interpretation of Dante outside of Italy, in other countries involved in religious reformation.

On or before 1 August 2020, please send the following documents/information to Erminia Ardissino (erminia.ardissino@unito.it) and Aileen A. Feng (aafeng@arizona.edu):

  • full name, current academic affiliation, and email address
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (5 pages, maximum)
  • A / V needs

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Religion  Religious Studies 

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Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

Posted By Alice Brooke, Friday, July 10, 2020

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

The politics of the early modern Atlantic World are inseparable from religion. Indeed, the role of Western Christianity, both Protestant and Catholic, in nation formation and colonial expansion across the Spanish, Portuguese, English, and French-speaking worlds is indisputable. In recent decades, however, increasing attention has been paid to the multi-faceted ways in which religious literary texts were used both to uphold and to question the political status quo. In particular, scholars have highlighted the importance of non-Christian religious voices in changing our understanding of the role of literary creation as a source of resistance to dominant political narratives. This panel invites proposals that explore in new ways this relationship between religious faith and literary creation throughout the Atlantic World. In what ways was religious literature used both to affirm and to resist imperial narratives? What impact did these texts have on wider discourses of nationalism, imperialism, and expansion? How did the lives of Jews, Muslims, and other religious minorities intersect with colonialist aims? How does a deeper understanding of the presence of non-Christian voices change how we understand the relationship between religion and politics in this period? What impact do these discourses continue to have on the place of religious communities in these regions in the present day?

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alice.brooke@merton.ox.ac.uk or imogen.choi@exeter.ox.ac.uk by August 7 2020:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract
  • A single page CV

Tags:  Americas  British Empire  Comparative Literature  English Literature  eurocentrism  French Empire  French Literature  Geographies  Global Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Missions  networks  Portuguese Empire  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  theology 

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Alchemy, Wonder and Belief in Renaissance Naples

Posted By Marco Marino, Tuesday, June 30, 2020

The Aragonese court was instrumental in the spread of the Italian Renaissance around the Neapolitan area: at the time of Alfonso V (1442-58) a strong cultural program was developed.

Under Ferrante I (1458-1494) the court, along with academies focusing on philology, poetry, and scientific and political thought, became the reference points for the vernacular's culture. The hermetic, alchemical, magical, and astrological traditions formed an outstanding and well defined corpus, subsequently enriched by Pontano and his school, Telesio's naturalism, Della Porta's physiognomy, Tasso's reflections on the marvelous, up until the speculations by Giordano Bruno.

This panel intends to analyze the role of this cultural crucible in the development of the philosophical and literary thought of some of the protagonists of Renaissance Naples.

Please send proposals by 5 August 2020 via email with the subject line “RSA 2021” to Marco Marino (marco.marino@santannainstitute.com). The proposal should include a title (15 words max.); an abstract (200 words max.); and a one-paragraph bio (300 words max.). Please provide also full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Tags:  Alchemy  Aragonese  History  Italy  Medicine and Science  Naples  Religion  Wonder 

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The Burden of Blood in Early Modern Spain

Posted By Amy E. Sheeran, Thursday, June 25, 2020

Although blood, as a symbol, has always been replete with meanings, in the context of early modern Spain, it becomes uniquely potent. This panel seeks to consider blood as a category of representational analysis, following the lead of Gil Anidjar and Joan Scott. In particular, within the context of the ideology of blood purity with its attention to blood’s content, origin, and legibility, representations of blood are evocative and layered. Recent attention to the history of blood purity statutes and their influence, as well as to the role of blood in shaping national, imperial, and religious identity in Spain, prompts further analysis of blood’s discursive potential in the early modern Iberian world. In this panel, we aim to consider how representational works approach and articulate the multilayered meanings blood allows in this context. We welcome interdisciplinary submissions focused on literary, historical, or visual works that consider medical and scientific knowledge; blood and its relation to race; the role of blood in signaling or establishing class; theological questions and debates; blood as a nexus of gender and sexuality, and other related concerns.

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with a proposed title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief CV to Amy Sheeran at sheeran1@otterbein.edu and Rachel Burk at rburk@ndm.edu by August 1.

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Nobility  Religion  Spanish Empire  theology  Women and Gender 

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Call for Papers: “Global Conversion: Cultures, Religions, and Encounters”

Posted By Frank Lacopo, Wednesday, June 24, 2020

The early modern period is characterized by increasing human movement, exchange of cultural knowledge, and resulting encounters between previously isolated epistemologies, belief systems, and language families. As a result of reform, early modern communities identified new forms of difference and magnified existing ones, creating yet more opportunities for encounter with the “other.” Rather than simply accept and tolerate cultural, religious, and intellectual difference, early moderns more often sought to convert persons and ideas as they crossed lines of encounter. New definitions of confession, race, and humanity necessitated institutions, ideologies, and rituals to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and bodies across hardened lines that formed at loci of encounter. Knowledge, practices, and bodies had to be converted into acceptable and comprehensible forms as they crossed marked boundaries across the early modern world.

This Call for Papers seeks scholarly presentations on any aspect of intergroup encounter and the processes, rituals, and spaces of conversion that they necessitated in the early modern world. Paper topics might include but are not limited to:

  • Ideologies and rhetorics surrounding religious conversion
  • The intersection of religious conversion and subject-making
  • Loci of conversion (conversion houses, missions, etc.)
  • The conversion/translation of non-European knowledge into forms comprehensible to Europeans, and vice versa
  • The place of religious conversion and the conversion of persons to new political loyalty in diplomacy
  • The intersection of migration, itineracy, and conversion
  • The conversion of bodies and spaces for new uses and functions as a result of reform or colonialism
  • The limits of conversion and translation for achieving cross-cultural legibility and political loyalty
  • Persons and knowledge that resisted conversion and the question of “toleration”

Please send a short CV (limit to one page), a presentation title, and a 150-word abstract to the session organizer Frank Lacopo (fxl60@psu.edu OR frank.lacopo@psu.edu). In addition, please detail any A/V requirements that you expect to have.

All presenters must register for the 67th Annual Renaissance Society of America Meeting, be committed to attending the conference in Dublin, and make their own travel arrangements.

For more information about the RSA Annual Meeting, please see the conference website: https://www.rsa.org/page/RSADublin2021

The deadline for the submission of materials for this panel is August 10, 2020, to allow ample time for final panel submission on August 15.

Tags:  Americas  Education  History  Jesuits  Legal and Political Thought  Missions  Religion  Rhetoric  social history  theology 

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Call for Papers: Giordano Bruno, Theologian

Posted By Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (SMRP), Wednesday, June 24, 2020

The Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy requests submissions for panels to be held at the RSA's Dublin 2021 (7-10 April) meeting on the topic: 'Giordano Bruno, Theologian'

During his wanderings through Europe in the 1580s, Giordano Bruno famously announced himself to the world as a philosopher. He published numerous philosophical works, taught philosophy at several Catholic and Protestant universities, and regaled acquaintances and strangers alike with, in the words of one member of his erstwhile order, ‘the fantastic, bizarre things of his invention’. Yet, by vocation, Bruno was a friar. He had entered the Dominican monastery of San Domenico Maggiore in Naples as a novice in 1565, been ordained as a priest in 1572 and obtained a doctorate in theology in 1575.

This early phase of his intellectual career left its mark on what he called his ‘new philosophy’, for all that it contradicted Christian doctrine at almost every turn. His surviving works cite and allude to Scripture repeatedly, discuss God’s triune nature, invoke the Scriptual idea of the angels announcing God’s glory to describe the celestial bodies populating the infinite universe, and present Bruno himself as the saviour of souls, to mention just a few instances of their continuous recourse to Christian doctrine and themes.

If you would like to give a paper exploring this aspect of Bruno’s philosophy, please submit a proposal, via email, to Dilwyn Knox (d.knox@ucl.ac.uk) by Monday, 27 July, 2020. Your proposal should include your name, academic affiliation, email address, the title of your paper, an abstract of no more than 200 words, and a (very) brief CV or, if more convenient, a link to an online CV or the equivalent.

Tags:  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Religion  theology 

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Looking to join a panel or roundtable

Posted By Thomas Q. Marabello, Thursday, June 18, 2020

Greetings!

I am a new RSA member interested in joining/contributing to a panel or workshop proposal at the 2021 conference. I'm a career switcher and former teacher of European history. I got my MA in Medieval and Early Modern European Studies from Georgetown University. My areas of research/interest include: Renaissance Italy, Habsburg Austria, English Reformation, Tudor England, The Jesuits, Catholic Reformation, Early Modern Europe. My master's thesis was on the roots of The English Reformation from the reigns of William I to Henry VIII. I'm happy to do research or help with a proposal in these areas. Thank you!

Tags:  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art  Jesuits  Religion  Religious Studies 

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CfP: El Grupo de investigación Pensamiento y Tradición jesuita en la modernidad temprana (PEMOSJ)

Posted By Juan Antonio Senent-De Frutos, Thursday, June 18, 2020

El Grupo de investigación Pensamiento y Tradición jesuita en la modernidad temprana (PEMOSJ), en calidad de grupo de investigación integrado (Associate Organization) en The Renaissance Society of America, le ofrece participar en el próximo Annual Meeting de esta sociedad científica, que se celebrará en Dublín del 7 al 10 de abril de 2021.

En el apartado secciones puede enviar su resúmen hasta el próximo 31 de julio seleccionando la sección en la que desea participar. Puede utilizar el siguiente formato descargable a través de este enlace.

Una vez aceptados los resumenes el próximo 10 de septiembre se abrirá el plazo para enviar las comunicaciones completas hasta el 1 de febrero de 2021.

Antes de la celebración de las jornadas en Dublín, los respectivos artículos serán difundidos entre los participantes de la sección. Todos los artículos recibidos serán evaluados por pares. A la luz de la evaluación, se realizará una selección de artículos en orden a su publicación posterior. Antes del 30 de abril los organizadores se pondrán en contacto con los autores seleccionados para su publicación en Journal of Jesuit Studies; o en la colección Jesuit Studies book series, ambas dirigida por Robert A. Maryks en editorial Brill.

Idiomas para las secciones/paneles: Las propuestas, y los textos completos, pueden ser remitidos y defendidos en los siguientes idiomas: castellano o inglés.

En función del destino de su posible publicación, el texto revisado podrá ser requerido en la lengua admitida en la publicación final, y con los estándares lingüísticos y científicos requeridos por la edición correspondiente.

Comité científico:

Juan Antonio Senent-De Frutos (Director Archivo Francisco Suárez, Universidad Loyola Andalucía), Robert A. Maryks (Editor-in-Chief Journal of Jesuit Studies y Jesuit Studies book series, Brill), Pedro Calafate (Universidad de Lisboa), Capucine Boidin (Directrice Professeure à la Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3 – IHEAL), Alfredo Culleton (PPG Filosofia Unisinos), Jacob Schmutz (Filosofía e Historia, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris 4), Giannina Burlando (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile), Pilar Pena Búa (Universidad Loyola), Eduardo Ibáñez (Universidad Loyola), Pablo Font-Oporto (Universidad Loyola), Wenceslao Soto (Archivum Historicum Societatis Iesu, Roma).

Tags:  Americas  Francisco Suárez  Hispanic Literature  History  Jesuits  Neo-Latin Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  SJ 

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