This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
Print Page   |   Sign In   |   Register
RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
Blog Home All Blogs

This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Dr

Posted By Samantha J. Hughes-Johnson, Monday, August 3, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

(Deadline: 10 August 2020)

 

The Society for Confraternity Studies will sponsor a number of sessions at the 67thAnnual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (7- 10 April 2021) in Dublin. Accordingly, it invites proposals for papers on the following theme:

 

Contagium: Exploring the Nexus Between Confraternity, Pandemic and Renaissance Society

 

 

Since global communities are currently experiencing the liminal stage of withdrawing from varying degrees of quarantine and social isolation, the Society for Confraternity Studies is keen to scrutinize how Renaissance lay charitable institutions and sodalities grappled with the corporeal, emotional and fiscal injuries caused by society’s exposure to pandemics and epidemics and how their various actions can inform our own social, economic and psychological recuperation. Accordingly, we invite papers that explore the breadth and impact of lay sodalities operating in affected geographical areas between 1300 and 1700. Papers might focus on, but are not limited to the following topics:

  • The impact of pandemics on the restrictions of goods and humans and how quarantines, social distancing and limitations on travel affected regular confraternity operations and in turn, touched recipients of charity.
  • Legacies and donations awarded to confraternities in light of the plague. Including comparative studies of bequests during times of epidemic and good fortune and those that juxtapose geographically disparate data for the purpose of analysis.
  • The orientation of medical science and spiritual doctrine during epidemics and lay charitable institutions’ roles in this co-ordination.
  • Artistic commissions of confraternities and other lay charitable institutions and how these reflected the various injuries caused to society by outbreaks of pestilence. 
  • The impact of post-plague art, architecture, drama, music and ephemera commissioned by confraternities on public spaces and/or the popular conscience.
  • The actual and notional value of prophylactic measures designed to protect the body and soul during outbreaks and to what extent these were taken up by lay brotherhoods.
  •  Confraternity membership and how this was affected by one or more of the following: fear of mass burial; church and oratory closure; fear of the afterlife; concerns regarding spiritual conduct in the face of imminent death. 
  • The personal toll of plague on those lay brothers and sisters entrusted with public service, healthcare and the custody of people or objects.
  • The influence of pestilence on public and private confraternal ritual. 

 

Papers should concentrate on confraternal activities between 1300 and 1700. We are however, also particularly interested in proposals that discuss the value of emerging confraternity studies focusing on historical pandemics and how their findings can inform our own twenty-first century recuperation following our recent encounter with Covid 19. 

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email, the paper title (no longer than 15 words), the abstract of the paper (no longer than 150 words), a short academic C.V. (between one and five pages), and a series of key-words that suit the presentation. Please be sure all seven (7) categories of information are clearly provided. 

Please submit your proposal to Dr Samantha J.C. Hughes-Johnson at samanthajanecaroline@yahoo.co.uk by [10 August 2020].


Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  black death  bubonic plague  charity  confraternity  death and gender  Death studies  History  History of Medicine  history of science  hospitals  interdiscplinary  Italian Renaissance Art  lay sisterhoods  Material Studies  Medicine and Science  Performing Arts and Theater  piety  Religious Studies  Renaissance  renaissance medicine  ritual  Women and Gender 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

New Avenues for Processional Devotions

Posted By Mitzi Kirkland-Ives, Sunday, July 19, 2020

In the late medieval and early modern period a body of devotional practices emerged in which Christians engaged not only in contemplation of the episodes of the Passion and similar narratives but also in imaginative reenactment of those events: the Stations of the Cross in various forms, the Sorrows of the Virgin, the Falls of Christ, and related traditions. These devotions were often structured via passage from station to station across a real (or purely imagined) landscape, sometimes mapped out onto the preexisting landscape—urban streets, cloisters, church interiors—and sometimes supported by environments constructed for the purpose: Sacri monti, field chapels, and the like. This session seeks to highlight new contributions to this area of study in art history, literature, and other relevant fields of study; particularly welcome are contributions reflecting developments across a wide geographical scope including the Americas and less studied corners of Europe and the Mediterranean basin.

Please submit a title and 150 word abstract to Mitzi Kirkland-Ives (mkirklandives@missouristate.edu), as well as a two-page research c.v., by August 10, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Religion  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Visual Studies 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

The 'I' in the Margins: Poetry, Memoirs, Letters and Paratexts by Reformed exiles

Posted By Clara Marías, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 15, 2020

In the last decades, increasing attention has been paid to the works written or translated by Reformed exiles during the 16th and 17th centuries. From a European perspective, the monographies published by the members of the research group EMoDiR are a good example, and on the Spanish reformed exiles, scholars such as Carlos Gilly, Massimo Firpo, Ignacio García Pinilla, Doris Moreno, James Amelang, or Rady Roldán-Figueroa have edited and studied several works, expanding our knowledge about them. However, these translations and original writings from Juan de Valdés, Francisco de Enzina, Juan Pérez de Pineda, Casiodoro de Reina, Antonio del Corro, Tomás Carrascón, Nicolás y Sacharles, among others, have been studied from the perspective of History or History of Religion, rather than as literary works and often without a focus on their self-fashioning perspective and the ideological and political intentions of the authors.

For this reason, this panel invites proposals from scholars interested in analyzing the poetry, memoirs, letters and paratexts (introductions, dedicatory epistles, etc.) from Reformed exiles, dealing with the manners in which the authors, far from their countries and often persecuted and in danger, living “in the margins”, presented their lives and ideas and their faith and conversion by means of various rhetorical strategies, including dissimulation, persuasion, fictionalization or confrontation.

The proposals should study works by reformed exiles from any European country with a Catholic majority during the Early Modern period, with a literary approach to the poetry, memoirs, letters, prologues and dedicatory epistles selected for discussion.

Interested participants should send the following in a single document to Clara Marías (cmarias@us.es) by August 7, 2020:

  • Paper title
  • A single page CV
  • Abstract (about 500 words)

Tags:  Cultural Networks  Diaries  emotional history  European history  European literature  exile  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italy  Literature  memoirs  Memory Studies  Networks  Philosophy  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Rhetoric  self-fashioning  Spanish literature  translation 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

"Dante's Legacy in Renaissance Politics & Religion" (sponsored by Dante Society of America)

Posted By Aileen A. Feng, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 13, 2020

Organized by Erminia Ardissino (Università degli Studi di Torino), with Aileen A. Feng (University of Arizona; Dante Society of America's representative to RSA)

This panel intends to shed new, broader light on the use of Dante’s works in the religious turmoil of Renaissance Europe and the foundation of the early modern political world. While at the end of the fifteenth century in Florence the poet was wrongly believed to be the translator of seven penitential psalms and the author of a Credo, both of which were print successes running into several editions, his Comedy and political treatise De monarchia were later taken as examples of an anti-papal position, especially in the Reformed world and in heterodox circles. On the 700th anniversary of Dante's death, to be celebrated in 2021, this panel will explore the interpretation, editing, manipulation, and use of Dante’s writings in religious and/or political terms within the frame of European religious strife, when the poet’s ideas were used to support or attack various confessional identities. Moreover, we are interested in the use of his political works not only in religious controversies, but also in the process of founding a new political science as political autonomy from religion was sought.  In addition to papers focused on Italy, we particularly encourage projects dealing with the reception and interpretation of Dante outside of Italy, in other countries involved in religious reformation.

On or before 1 August 2020, please send the following documents/information to Erminia Ardissino (erminia.ardissino@unito.it) and Aileen A. Feng (aafeng@arizona.edu):

  • full name, current academic affiliation, and email address
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (5 pages, maximum)
  • A / V needs

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Religion  Religious Studies 

Share |
Permalink
 

Renaissance Bergamo: At the Edge of the Venetian Terraferma

Posted By Emanuela Vai, Friday, July 10, 2020

Present day Bergamo is bifurcated into an upper and lower portion of the city by the Venetian walls, built in 1561-1623 to discourage Milanese northward expansion, as well as to limit contraband trade. Bergamo was one of the most important of the strong points fortified by the Venetian state in the sixteenth century, through its position at the end of the chain in acting as the true shield of all the other cities, as one of its officials described. Resting among the foothills of the Bergamasque Alps, it lies a mere twenty-five miles northeast of the Spanish duchy of Milan. Under Venetian rule, Bergamo was the westernmost fortress town of the Venetian Republic’s terraferma empire. In addition to the Milan/Venice border, Bergamo sat at an important crossroads between the Venetian Republic, German lands north of the Alps, and other Italian city states. This begs the question, why is a location such as Bergamo, crucial as both an interregional communication point between the Venetian Republic and other parts of the Italian peninsula, largely side-lined in Renaissance and Early Modern studies?

Recent studies in Renaissance geopolitics have highlighted the important strategic role of liminal cities and their function in wider socio-political landscapes. To this end, this CFP invites paper proposals for a series of interdisciplinary panels from scholars working in musicology, art history, cultural history, book history and material and visual culture studies looking at Bergamo at the dawn of the early modern period. The aim is to rethink and reassess critical perspectives within Venetian Studies from the analysis of the Venetian state’s borders, with a view to an edited collection on the subject.

Topics could include/address, but are not limited to:

  • Architectural languages
  • Codicology
  • Confraternity studies
  • Education studies
  • Mediation and circulation of music
  • New technologies and historical research
  • Practices of patronage, collecting and selling art
  • Regionalism, mobility and cultural exchanges
  • War history
  • Women’s studies

As per RSA guidelines, proposals should be submitted in English and should include:

  • Paper title (15-word max)
  • Full name, current affiliation, and email address
  • Keywords (4 max)
  • Abstract (150-word max)
  • Short bio (150 words)
  • Short CV (2-page max)

Please send your proposal to Emanuela Vai (Worcester College, Oxford) and Jason Rosenholtz-Witt (Northwestern University, Chicago) by Wednesday, 5 August 2020:

emanuela.vai@worc.ox.ac.uk

jasonkrw@gmail.com

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  lay brotherhoods  lay sisterhoods  Music  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Urban Studies  Veneto  Visual Studies 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

Posted By Alice Brooke, Friday, July 10, 2020

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

The politics of the early modern Atlantic World are inseparable from religion. Indeed, the role of Western Christianity, both Protestant and Catholic, in nation formation and colonial expansion across the Spanish, Portuguese, English, and French-speaking worlds is indisputable. In recent decades, however, increasing attention has been paid to the multi-faceted ways in which religious literary texts were used both to uphold and to question the political status quo. In particular, scholars have highlighted the importance of non-Christian religious voices in changing our understanding of the role of literary creation as a source of resistance to dominant political narratives. This panel invites proposals that explore in new ways this relationship between religious faith and literary creation throughout the Atlantic World. In what ways was religious literature used both to affirm and to resist imperial narratives? What impact did these texts have on wider discourses of nationalism, imperialism, and expansion? How did the lives of Jews, Muslims, and other religious minorities intersect with colonialist aims? How does a deeper understanding of the presence of non-Christian voices change how we understand the relationship between religion and politics in this period? What impact do these discourses continue to have on the place of religious communities in these regions in the present day?

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alice.brooke@merton.ox.ac.uk or imogen.choi@exeter.ox.ac.uk by August 7 2020:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract
  • A single page CV

Tags:  Americas  British Empire  Comparative Literature  English Literature  eurocentrism  French Empire  French Literature  Geographies  Global Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Missions  networks  Portuguese Empire  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  theology 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Information and Loyalty Networks: Local Mediators in the Global Construction of Empires (16th century)

Posted By Ida Mauro, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

Session organized by Ida Mauro and Diego Sola, University of Barcelona.

Research group REDIF. Redes de información y fidelidad: los mediadores territoriales en la construcción global de la Monarquía de España (1500-1700).

The aim of this session is to attract papers to reflect on complex political systems (CPS) in the Early Modern Age, which were dominated by the convergence of multiple interests, and their need to gather information about their subjects from different sources. As a rule, local actors played an essential role in achieving the system’s political aims of integration and governance. The global expansion of the Spanish and Portuguese monarchies and of the Ottoman Empire in the 16th century, in which different institutions, social and economic practices, and political and religious traditions converged, demanded communication and information mechanisms to convey the necessary knowledge about both territories and people.

These local, political or religious, ‘agents’ were a sort of “transmission belt” between the court and its European, American, African and Asian territories; they defended local interests while delivering information about distant political and cultural contexts. They complemented the action of other political actors (such as viceroys, governors and superior councils) and provided a more direct means of communication between the subjects and the king. These local actors include a wide array of intellectuals, such as the humanist Mariangelo Accursio or the writer Giovan Battista Pino, who defended their cities’ interests at Charles V’s court; religious reformers, such as Diego de Salazar and José de Acosta, who connected distant territories in Asia, America and Europe with their ecclesiastical work during the reign of Philip II; or the missionaries Andrés de Urdaneta and Martín de Loyola, who connected peoples and experiences both within and outside the empire’s borders, also in the 16th century.

We welcome papers on local agents, both individuals and groups (secular or religious), which were active within the same territory, their role, networks, religious identity, production of texts and accounts. The aim of this session is to re-create the human and information-related dimension of a universe of local agents that constantly moved back and forth between their territories and decision-making centres.

Their essential role provides a new insight into Early Modern governance, which was based on the strategic action of territorial mediators, as well as to present Early Modern empires as a laboratory of knowledge in which the operation of territorial mediators played an essential role in the governance of different contexts and interests.

Please send proposals, including a 150-word abstract with your paper title, full name, current affiliation, and a short CV (up to 5 pages) by July 31th, 2020 to Dr. Ida Mauro idamauro@ub.edu and Dr. Diego Sola diegosola@ub.edu

For further information see the Renaissance Society of America meeting website: www.rsa.org/page/RSADublin2021

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Americas  China  Diaries  European history  Hispanic Literature  Jesuits  Missions  Nobility  Portuguese Literature  Religious Studies  Republic of Letters  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  the courtier  translational imaginaries  trasnational studies 

Share |
Permalink
 

PLAGUES IN EARLY-MODERN EUROPE

Posted By Armando Maggi, Sunday, July 5, 2020
Updated: Sunday, July 5, 2020

This session investigates the concept/phenomenon of 'plague' in early-modern Europe also to enlighten our contemporary experience of Covid-19. Its scope is intentionally broad. We don't merely aim to collect a series of visual representations or descriptive analyses of fictional narratives concerning plagues (Decameron, etc.). Our interest lies also, and primarily, in papers that investigate the cultural, artistic, and social repercussions brought about by plagues, and also the medical reflections specifically dedicated to the symptoms and treatments of this infectious disease. How did European culture see and theorize the phenomenon of the plague in its multiple manifestations? What did 'infection' mean? What role did the plague play in the European consciousness? How did medical treatises describe the evolution of the disease in its most devastating and visible effects? Did the plagues play any role in shaping the early-modern philosophical consciousness? How did the plagues affect early-modern religious sensibility?

Interested panelists must send the following material: title, abstract (150 words) and updated C.V. no later than AUGUST 10 to Prof. Armando Maggi (amaggi@uchicago.edu).

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  art history  Baroque  bubonic plague  European history  European literature  Religious Studies  renaissance medicine 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Sequestration and the City: Confinement, Exclusion, and Enclosure

Posted By Jessica A. Stevenson Stewart, Monday, June 22, 2020

Although cities are fundamentally sites of connectivity, the pandemic-induced isolation of 2020 has renewed our awareness of the strain and tension that seclusion brings, especially in densely urbanized areas. This session draws on our recent experiences of the Covid19 crisis and revisits the history of urban disconnection and disconnectedness. Rather than focusing strictly on epidemics, we want to take a broader view of seclusion and sequestration as marked forms of social exclusion. While scholarship in the wake of mobility studies has expanded our understanding of the global flow of people, goods, and ideas, it has often overlooked social and spatial barriers that constrained movement, particularly within cities. For even though urban centers functioned as networks, they also instituted and perpetuated division, separation, and exclusion.

This session explores the spatial and representational means by which certain persons and groups were separated from the urban life around them, either voluntarily or involuntarily. We ask how zones or sites of separation were established within the city, and how the immobility of some interacted with the mobility of others. Such spaces may have been constructed by and for an individual, by civic authorities, or by groups formed with the intent of exclusivity. The confinement in question may have been a form of punishment (e.g., the prisoner, heretic, or exile), a means of quarantine (e.g., the leper or plague victim), a welcome and self-imposed withdrawal, (e.g., the individual in a “closet” or study), or an ethical detachment, (e.g., religious retreat behind walls or within cloisters). We ask whether urban configurations hid the excluded and isolated, or if their presence was known and even advertised.

What architecture, rituals, and representations kept the excluded bodies present and acknowledged in the urban psyche? How did the exclusion of some mark civic identity for others? How did the interior and exterior architecture of particular buildings enforce social separation? What forms of material culture accompanied the separated individual and were those objects part of what marked the person as apart from normative civic culture? When were seclusion and sequestration valued? What historical philosophies informed early modern conceptualizations of exclusion, seclusion, isolation, and confinement? What contemporary theories provide frameworks for understanding the psychological, social, and geographical valences of these experiences?

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief curriculum vitae by August 1 to Elizabeth Honig at elizahonig@yahoo.com and Jessica Stewart at sinopia@gmail.com

Session Keywords: Urban History, Immobility, Exclusion

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  History  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Material Studies  Religious Studies  Urban Studies  Visual Studies 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Looking to join a panel or roundtable

Posted By Thomas Q. Marabello, Thursday, June 18, 2020

Greetings!

I am a new RSA member interested in joining/contributing to a panel or workshop proposal at the 2021 conference. I'm a career switcher and former teacher of European history. I got my MA in Medieval and Early Modern European Studies from Georgetown University. My areas of research/interest include: Renaissance Italy, Habsburg Austria, English Reformation, Tudor England, The Jesuits, Catholic Reformation, Early Modern Europe. My master's thesis was on the roots of The English Reformation from the reigns of William I to Henry VIII. I'm happy to do research or help with a proposal in these areas. Thank you!

Tags:  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art  Jesuits  Religion  Religious Studies 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

CfP: El Grupo de investigación Pensamiento y Tradición jesuita en la modernidad temprana (PEMOSJ)

Posted By Juan Antonio Senent-De Frutos, Thursday, June 18, 2020

El Grupo de investigación Pensamiento y Tradición jesuita en la modernidad temprana (PEMOSJ), en calidad de grupo de investigación integrado (Associate Organization) en The Renaissance Society of America, le ofrece participar en el próximo Annual Meeting de esta sociedad científica, que se celebrará en Dublín del 7 al 10 de abril de 2021.

En el apartado secciones puede enviar su resúmen hasta el próximo 31 de julio seleccionando la sección en la que desea participar. Puede utilizar el siguiente formato descargable a través de este enlace.

Una vez aceptados los resumenes el próximo 10 de septiembre se abrirá el plazo para enviar las comunicaciones completas hasta el 1 de febrero de 2021.

Antes de la celebración de las jornadas en Dublín, los respectivos artículos serán difundidos entre los participantes de la sección. Todos los artículos recibidos serán evaluados por pares. A la luz de la evaluación, se realizará una selección de artículos en orden a su publicación posterior. Antes del 30 de abril los organizadores se pondrán en contacto con los autores seleccionados para su publicación en Journal of Jesuit Studies; o en la colección Jesuit Studies book series, ambas dirigida por Robert A. Maryks en editorial Brill.

Idiomas para las secciones/paneles: Las propuestas, y los textos completos, pueden ser remitidos y defendidos en los siguientes idiomas: castellano o inglés.

En función del destino de su posible publicación, el texto revisado podrá ser requerido en la lengua admitida en la publicación final, y con los estándares lingüísticos y científicos requeridos por la edición correspondiente.

Comité científico:

Juan Antonio Senent-De Frutos (Director Archivo Francisco Suárez, Universidad Loyola Andalucía), Robert A. Maryks (Editor-in-Chief Journal of Jesuit Studies y Jesuit Studies book series, Brill), Pedro Calafate (Universidad de Lisboa), Capucine Boidin (Directrice Professeure à la Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3 – IHEAL), Alfredo Culleton (PPG Filosofia Unisinos), Jacob Schmutz (Filosofía e Historia, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris 4), Giannina Burlando (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile), Pilar Pena Búa (Universidad Loyola), Eduardo Ibáñez (Universidad Loyola), Pablo Font-Oporto (Universidad Loyola), Wenceslao Soto (Archivum Historicum Societatis Iesu, Roma).

Tags:  Americas  Francisco Suárez  Hispanic Literature  History  Jesuits  Neo-Latin Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  SJ 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Women Religious and the Project of Empire

Posted By Alexandra C. Verini, Friday, June 12, 2020

In recent decades, increasing attention has been paid to the political and literary contributions of early modern nuns. Such research has ably demonstrated that, despite mandates of enclosure, Catholic women religious were active in the world, playing key roles in political resistance, in nation formation and in colonial expansion. Seeking to expand this research geographically and temporally, this panel invites new work on the engagement of early modern women religious across the globe, whether as collaborators or resisters, in colonialist and imperialist projects and in their afterlives. How were the lives of women religious whether in the Spanish New World or in New France entangled with colonialist aims? How do the traces of institutions started by early modern women, such as Mary Ward’s Loreto Institute, emerge within the British Empire? What might reading Catholic women’s religious orders alongside imperialism and colonialism reveal about the intersection between religion and politics in the early modern period and beyond? What impact did these women’s communities have on religious, pedagogical, and nationalist agendas within the project of empire and its aftermaths? 

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alexandra.verini@ashoka.edu.in by July 31st:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract (no longer than 150 words)
  • A single page CV

**All speakers must become RSA members before the conference. In addition, because this is being submitted for consideration as a sponsored panel, all accepted speakers must also become members of the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender.

Tags:  British Empire  French Empire  History  Portuguese Empire  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Women and Gender 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, June 11, 2020

Call for Papers, Renaissance Society of America Conference, Dublin, Ireland, April 7-10, 2021

The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) is has announced that it will accept proposals for individual presentation proposals and complete panels for its 2021 annual conference, to be held April 7-10, 2021 in Dublin, Ireland.  The Journal of Jesuit Studies regularly sponsors up to five panels at this conference.  We are looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700.  (Please note: Sponsorship by the JJS does not guarantee acceptance to the program.)

Please submit abstracts on topics related to Jesuits on the subjects of: history, literary studies, art history, music history, or related topics, of no more than 150 words, along with a short list of keywords, and a BRIEF CV (no more than 300 words, including affiliation, rank and one or two important publications or other evidence of scholarship) to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 1, 2020.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.

Further information about the RSA, the Dublin conference, and the general Call for Papers is available at https://www.rsa.org/page/RSADublin2021.

 

Thank you.

Kathleen M. Comerford
Professor of History, Georgia Southern University

Download File (DOCX)

Tags:  Africa  Art and Architecture  Art History  Asia  Comparative Literature  Education  French Empire  History  Jesuits  Missions  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Portuguese Empire  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal