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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Fragments of Order. Inventing antiquity between Italy and the Low Countries

Posted By Max Wiringa, Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Session organized by prof. Krista De Jonge (KU Leuven) and Max Wiringa (KU Leuven) as part of the project Fragments of Order, supported by the Research Foundation Flanders. Chair: Ethan Matt Kavaler (University of Toronto) – Respondent: Michael J. Waters (Columbia University)

The early sixteenth century saw a growing interest in Roman antiquity of painters and other artists, specifically from the Low Countries: for instance, Maarten van Heemskerck and Hermannus Posthumus roamed the city, copying its architectural fragments. This interest had its counterpart in contemporary architectural theory where archeological fragments were combined into the canon of the Five Orders. This long process of gestation came to a provisional end with the landmark publication of Sebastiano Serlio’s Fourth Book in 1537.

Combining architectural fragments is known as composto or composé, an important creative principle. The architectural strategy on which the Five Orders are based, has this in common with the visual discourse of representing space in antique guise. It led to much critique, amongst others by the translator of Serlio’s treatise, Pieter Coecke van Aelst, who directly connected it with the contemporary Netherlandish artistic context, i.e. painters such as Jan Gossart, Bernard van Orley and Lanceloot Blondeel. (Next to the traditional practice of copying on paper, )The transmission of motifs was aided by the newly invented medium of prints, which spread antique fragments to the Low Countries. Loose-leaved prints provide evidence of discourse through image alone, next to more text-dependent treatises.

This session thus focuses on a particular point of intersection between painterly and architectural practice in the Northern Renaissance during the early decades of the sixteenth century, in dialogue with contemporary developments in Italy. Against this background, possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Painters and other artists as inventors of the Antique
  • Visual architectural discourse and the role of prints and drawings in the design process
  • Composto as design strategy
  • Antique architectural fragments in contemporary visual culture

Proposals should adhere to the RSA guidelines:

  • Paper title (max. 15 words)
  • Abstract (max. 150 words)
  • CV up to 5 pages
  • PhD or other terminal degree completion date (past or expected)
  • Full name, current affiliation, and email address

Please send your proposal to Krista De Jonge (krista.dejonge@kuleuven.be) and Max Wiringa (max.wiringa@kuleuven.be) by Friday, August 7th.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Art Theory  Netherlandish art  Renaissance Architecture 

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New Avenues for Processional Devotions

Posted By Mitzi Kirkland-Ives, Sunday, July 19, 2020

In the late medieval and early modern period a body of devotional practices emerged in which Christians engaged not only in contemplation of the episodes of the Passion and similar narratives but also in imaginative reenactment of those events: the Stations of the Cross in various forms, the Sorrows of the Virgin, the Falls of Christ, and related traditions. These devotions were often structured via passage from station to station across a real (or purely imagined) landscape, sometimes mapped out onto the preexisting landscape—urban streets, cloisters, church interiors—and sometimes supported by environments constructed for the purpose: Sacri monti, field chapels, and the like. This session seeks to highlight new contributions to this area of study in art history, literature, and other relevant fields of study; particularly welcome are contributions reflecting developments across a wide geographical scope including the Americas and less studied corners of Europe and the Mediterranean basin.

Please submit a title and 150 word abstract to Mitzi Kirkland-Ives (mkirklandives@missouristate.edu), as well as a two-page research c.v., by August 10, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Religion  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Visual Studies 

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Renaissance Bergamo: At the Edge of the Venetian Terraferma

Posted By Emanuela Vai, Friday, July 10, 2020

Present day Bergamo is bifurcated into an upper and lower portion of the city by the Venetian walls, built in 1561-1623 to discourage Milanese northward expansion, as well as to limit contraband trade. Bergamo was one of the most important of the strong points fortified by the Venetian state in the sixteenth century, through its position at the end of the chain in acting as the true shield of all the other cities, as one of its officials described. Resting among the foothills of the Bergamasque Alps, it lies a mere twenty-five miles northeast of the Spanish duchy of Milan. Under Venetian rule, Bergamo was the westernmost fortress town of the Venetian Republic’s terraferma empire. In addition to the Milan/Venice border, Bergamo sat at an important crossroads between the Venetian Republic, German lands north of the Alps, and other Italian city states. This begs the question, why is a location such as Bergamo, crucial as both an interregional communication point between the Venetian Republic and other parts of the Italian peninsula, largely side-lined in Renaissance and Early Modern studies?

Recent studies in Renaissance geopolitics have highlighted the important strategic role of liminal cities and their function in wider socio-political landscapes. To this end, this CFP invites paper proposals for a series of interdisciplinary panels from scholars working in musicology, art history, cultural history, book history and material and visual culture studies looking at Bergamo at the dawn of the early modern period. The aim is to rethink and reassess critical perspectives within Venetian Studies from the analysis of the Venetian state’s borders, with a view to an edited collection on the subject.

Topics could include/address, but are not limited to:

  • Architectural languages
  • Codicology
  • Confraternity studies
  • Education studies
  • Mediation and circulation of music
  • New technologies and historical research
  • Practices of patronage, collecting and selling art
  • Regionalism, mobility and cultural exchanges
  • War history
  • Women’s studies

As per RSA guidelines, proposals should be submitted in English and should include:

  • Paper title (15-word max)
  • Full name, current affiliation, and email address
  • Keywords (4 max)
  • Abstract (150-word max)
  • Short bio (150 words)
  • Short CV (2-page max)

Please send your proposal to Emanuela Vai (Worcester College, Oxford) and Jason Rosenholtz-Witt (Northwestern University, Chicago) by Wednesday, 5 August 2020:

emanuela.vai@worc.ox.ac.uk

jasonkrw@gmail.com

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  lay brotherhoods  lay sisterhoods  Music  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Urban Studies  Veneto  Visual Studies 

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Reframing the Paragone: New Approaches to a Comparative Method of Artistic Analysis

Posted By Stefano Colombo, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Scholars have dealt at great length with the notion of paragone from the early modern period onwards. In art criticism, paragone is a technical jargon generally used to refer to the similarity between two things (for example artistic media) through the act of comparison. Because it involves the analogy between one thing and another, paragone invokes a comparative meter through which artistic practice is judged or recognized. Significantly, art historians have often resorted to paragone to refer to the competition of the arts, most notably painting and sculpture or poetry and painting. Although this interpretation of paragone is not unsubstantiated, recent scholarship has clarified that the actual meaning of paragone is much broader (Dempsey 2009; van Gastel et al. 2014; Nygren 2017). Going beyond the quarrel over the nobility of the arts, paragone implies the dialogic mode of reasoning typical of a debate, where both sides of an argument are discussed by means of a disputation (Dempsey 2009). This interpretation, which traces its roots in classical rhetoric and was revived in the Renaissance, has reshaped the notion of paragone as the basis of formal academic debate which is fundamental to all the arts and sciences.

This panel invites to reflect on paragone as a comparative method of visual analysis in the early modern period (ca. 1300-1700). In what ways does the flexible meaning of paragone help us reconsider the sources that laid the foundations of paragone itself, such as Benedetto Varchi or Leonardo da Vinci? Is paragone a fabrication of historiography, or was it already in effect in the Renaissance? Especially welcomed are papers that address paragone during Mannerism and the Baroque period. This is the moment when paragone entered the artistic debate of accademie, the learned societies whose members were erudite of various disciplines encompassing the visual arts, literature, law and philosophy. How did paragone influence artistic discourse in the accademie? And how did the exchange of ideas among members of these accademie inform on the production and reception of different art forms?

Topics of interest might include but are not limited to: interaction among different media, in particular, sculpture, architecture and literature; ekphrasis and visual rhetoric; the extent to which artists (and their patrons) relied on technical, scientific or theological formulations and how these influenced the making and reception of artworks; or the analysis of the dialogic mode of paragone through the analogy between the liberal arts and other branches of knowledge, such as the natural sciences, medicine or theology.

Please send an abstract (150-word maximum), a paper title (15-word maximum), 3-5 keywords, academic affiliation, PhD completion date (past or expected), a brief curriculum vitae, and any audio/visual requirements to Stefano Colombo (stefano.colombo.365@gmail.com) by August 8, 2020.

Tags:  Accademie  Art and Architecture  Art Theory  Classical Tradition  Ekphrasis  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Literature  Paragone  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture  Rhetoric  Sculpture  Transmediality 

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Early Modern Privacy?

Posted By Mette B. Bruun, Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Organizer: Centre for Privacy Studies, University of Copenhagen (www.teol.ku.dk/privacy)

 

Privacy is hardly a hallmark of Early Modern life. Rooms are crammed; beds are shared; doors are open; letters are copied; gossip runs wild; church and state survey the movements and mores of their subjects. Nonetheless, thresholds and boundaries do exist – be they material or immaterial ­– and they delineate spaces with regulated access, thus creating spaces with a particular potential for solitude, intimacy or a life without civic obligations.

In this panel, we will explore the terminologies, characteristics and ambience that pertain to Early Modern spaces of privacy. Perhaps such spaces are associated with terms related to ‘privacy’ or ‘the private’, and then it becomes a question how to identify the historical meaning of such terms. Perhaps such spaces are associated with emotions, activities or statuses that we think of as private or related to privacy, and it becomes a question how to avoid anachronism when dealing with them.

This panel is dedicated to spaces of privacy that are admired in poetry, explored in fiction, defined in legislation, identified in architectural plans, qualified in devotional treatises, represented in artworks, moulded in sermons or indicated in political theory. We are interested in spaces of privacy as they are built, furnished, adorned, portrayed, used, imagined, cultivated, restricted, protected, accessed, feared or lauded in the Early Modern period, and we are looking forward to learning more about scholarly approaches that enable us to grasp the complexities and historical particularities of such spaces.

To apply:

Please upload an abstract (150 words), a CV (3-5 pp) and, if relevant, a request for a travel bursary via this formhttps://teol.ku.dk/privacy/join-us/call-for-publications/panel-for-the-renaissance-society-of-america-conference-in-dublin-2021/panel/

Deadline 10 August

 

If you have questions, please contact Mette Birkedal Bruun, Professor of Church History at the University of Copenhagen and director of the Centre for Privacy Studies: mbb@teol.ku.dk

The speakers whose proposal are accepted will be expected to engage in a dialogue to enhance the cohesion of the panel.

 

Please note: Speakers must become RSA members by 1 November

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Closet Drama  Daily Life  Diaries  English Literature  Gardens  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  piety  poetics  Renaissance Architecture  sexuality  social history  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Gardens and Academies in Early Modern Europe

Posted By Denis Ribouillault, Tuesday, June 30, 2020

The objective of this session or series of sessions is to explore the place and role of gardens in early modern academies. Although research on academies has expanded considerably in recent decades (Vagenheim et al., 2008), little has been written about the places where they met, including gardens, with the possible exception of the Bosco Parrasio in Rome (Grant, 2018). How did an academy choose its setting and why? How have literary and scientific activities and debates influenced the architectural, artistic and/or horticultural qualities of the chosen venue? In other words, can the iconography of gardens be linked to academic activities?  What role, for example, did the memory of Plato's Academy and Greek academies in general play in the development of early modern gardens (Ribouillault, 2018)? These questions demand that the garden be considered as a place of performance and require a multidisciplinary and intermedial approach. Articles on the use of gardens in scientific academies are particularly welcome.

Katrina Grant, «The Bosco Parrasio as a Site of Pleasure and of Sadness», Histoire culturelle de l'Europe 3 (2018) ; URL : http://www.unicaen.fr/mrsh/hce/index.php?id=1254

Denis Ribouillault, « Hortus academicus : les académies de la renaissance et le jardin », in Des jardins et des livres, Michael Jakob (ed.), Geneva: Mètis Press, 2018, p. 23-34 ; URL : http://hdl.handle.net/1866/23258

Ginette Vagenheim et al. (eds), Les Académies dans l’Europe humaniste. Idéaux et pratiques, Geneva: Droz, 2008.

Proposals of no more than 300 words with a title and a short bio (300 words max.) should be sent to ginette.vagenheim@univ-rouen.fr and denis.ribouillault@umontreal.ca before July, 31, 2020. Please indicate « RSA 2021 » in the subject line.

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Gardens  History of Science  History of Technology  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art  Literature  Renaissance Architecture  social history  Villa 

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Mining for the Earth-Based Sciences

Posted By Katie Jakobiec, Thursday, June 18, 2020

Organizers: Stefano Gulizia (PAN, Warsaw); Katie Jakobiec (University of Toronto)

This panel is sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS), University of Toronto, for the 67th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, to be held in Dublin, Ireland, on 7-10 April 2021. We warmly invite submissions and hope to select 3-4 papers for presentation according to the following outline.

Between 1450 and 1650, in the aftermath of a great technological change in metallurgy, a vast Central European space including centres such as Trento, Chemnitz, and Goslar specialized and clustered into new industrial hubs. In our historiography of the period, as well, mining has emerged as a nexus for studying the interface between natural history, physiology, and the processing of materials. Thanks to Anna Marie Roos’s The Salt of the Earth (Brill 2007) and Laboratories of Art, edited by Sven Dupré (Springer 2014), to name only a few contributions, we have a refined understanding of how this artisanal knowledge related to alchemy and philosophy. More recently, a special issue of Renaissance Studies (34.1: 2019) edited by Tina Asmussen and Pamela O. Long undertook the ambitious and impressive task of accounting for Berggeschrey, or ‘mountain uproar’ in all its technological, legal, textual, and symbolic features, including the core ambivalence of ethnographic collections up to the new histories of labor in a reunited Germany.

By design, our session assigns a premium on epistemic practices over the two major viewpoints adopted by historians, namely folklore and socio-economic development. Overall, we would like to see the Renaissance mine and its paperwork as a concrete example of Hans-Jörg Rheinberger’s laboratory, and how objects appear and disappear, or perhaps, move from being merely ordinary to epistemic. Another larger outlook of this project is environmental. Paracelsus already endowed subterranean things with an enduring, palingenetic power which was then developed within an experimental framework; both James Delbourgo and Philippa Hellawell argued for a substantial yet persuasive extension of the domain of mining to include seascapes and submarine knowledge.

Given all this, and without pretenses to limit the analysis only to these points, we propose that:

  • the morphing of sites of extraction into sites of connectivity is potentially problematic; likewise, it is difficult to constraint the sheer variety of actors and agencies at a mine into the concept of a “trading zone” in which not everyone was “trading” (e.g. some were ‘accounting for’, others ‘enslaved to’, and so on). Could we improve on our metaphorical usage? In this regard, Renée Raphael’s 2019 essay in RS offers a valuable model of how the current ‘practical’ view of the trading zone hides a heavy reliance on textual learning.
  • there is a relation between cartographic curiosity and mining that still awaits to be fully explored, and this means dealing with maps, sections, landscapes, and representations of specimens. For example, we couldn’t find any reference in English-speaking scholarship to the Delineatio Wielicensis of 1645, that is, the map of the massive salt mine of Wieliczka, outside Cracow, in the context of the Polish scientific book of the seventeenth-century. How do we assess mining with regard to visual representation in earth sciences histories? Could we profitably turn to the tradition of geodesy and its instruments? And does the cartographic imagination link mining to topography, territoriality, and the military arts?
  • as a corollary to the last point, and because of our typical reliance on tacit or vernacular learning within an interdisciplinary-oriented history of knowledge, issues of mobility and redeployment have completely overwhelmed the traditional framework of geology, seen as the birth of a “new” science. Yet, there is still a lot to be gained from the longue durée of fifteenth-century artisanal humanism, as Ivano Dal Prete has stressed. We simply suggest that we need better studies of how mining relates to epistemic images of “deep time;” and to remind ourselves that even rocks and fossils were aligned to anatomical exercises.
  • so far, almost the entirety of our case studies came from the German-speaking world, which, in point of fact, has become synonymous with research on Renaissance mining. There is, however, an untapped wealth of materials pertaining to Italy, the Czech Republic, Poland-Lithuania, and the colonial Iberian experience. How would the ensuing picture differ? And how did the historical actors consider these lesser-studied mining towns as a built environment? Did an enviro-technical site function more like a networked object?

The deadline is July 15, 2020; notification of acceptance will come within 15 days after that date. To apply please: 1) submit an abstract of no more than 250 words, describing your proposal, and a 150-word narrative CV, which would serve as a basis for introducing you; 2) explicitly confirm proof of, or plan to obtain, a RSA membership; and 3) send all this as a single attachment to both organizers, at sgulizia@gmail.com and katie.jakobiec@utoronto.ca

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Artillery  Classical Tradition  Humanism  Legal and Political Thought  Material Culture  Materiality  Medicine and Science  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture 

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Symbols and Appropriations: Constructing Identities in Early Modern and Renaissance Italy (1350-1600).

Posted By Valentina Tomassetti, Thursday, June 18, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 13, 2020

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

Through history and times, architecture has always been used to express cultural messages and a social status. Since the Late Middle Ages and then throughout the whole Renaissance, the rising and developing system of Italian cities took extensive advantage from the evocative symbols of classical and Christian tradition, and borrowed elements from the past to create “emotional” architectures. Thus, by constructing new buildings and urban patterns, new identities were forged too, engaging citizens and users on social, political and cultural issues.

This panel invites papers addressing the role of the architecture as a way to arouse or conceal emotions, to build consensus through shared values, or to reconnect the urban community to its alleged ancestry. These could include, among others, studies on urban aspects, as well as on the reuse of spolia and the reinterpretation of classical standard models.

Interested panelists should send an abstract (200 words) and CV to Dr. Francesca Lembo-Fazio (fra.lembofazio@gmail.com) and Valentina Tomassetti (v.tomassetti@warwick.ac.uk) by August 3, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Emotional Architecture  History  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  Material Studies  Renaissance Architecture 

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