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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

New Avenues for Processional Devotions

Posted By Mitzi Kirkland-Ives, Sunday, July 19, 2020

In the late medieval and early modern period a body of devotional practices emerged in which Christians engaged not only in contemplation of the episodes of the Passion and similar narratives but also in imaginative reenactment of those events: the Stations of the Cross in various forms, the Sorrows of the Virgin, the Falls of Christ, and related traditions. These devotions were often structured via passage from station to station across a real (or purely imagined) landscape, sometimes mapped out onto the preexisting landscape—urban streets, cloisters, church interiors—and sometimes supported by environments constructed for the purpose: Sacri monti, field chapels, and the like. This session seeks to highlight new contributions to this area of study in art history, literature, and other relevant fields of study; particularly welcome are contributions reflecting developments across a wide geographical scope including the Americas and less studied corners of Europe and the Mediterranean basin.

Please submit a title and 150 word abstract to Mitzi Kirkland-Ives (mkirklandives@missouristate.edu), as well as a two-page research c.v., by August 10, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Religion  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Visual Studies 

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Ways of Knowing: Re-evaluating Artistic Education in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Caroline E. Paganussi, Tuesday, July 14, 2020

The establishment of observation and experimentation as essential modes of knowledge formation in early modern Italy has been well-established in recent scholarship. Artists participated in this paradigm shift, using contemporary rhetorical strategies to forcefully and eloquently assert the nobility of their profession. Often without the benefit of advanced education, they drew on discourses such as the disputa delle arti to prove their intellectual credentials and, by extension, their proximity to the studia humanitatis. This last observation invites us to reevaluate the issue of artistic education. What did artists know in early modern Italy? How did they come to know it outside of traditional academic settings? What communities and interactions informed their practice? And how did less traditional modes of knowledge formation inform the cultivation of artistic identity?

We invite proposals that explore early modern artists and the acquisition and dissemination of rhetorical, philosophical, and theological knowledge. Topics may include (but are not limited to): the acquisition of religious, historical, poetic, and philosophical concepts expressed in artworks; repetition or re-use of knowledge in multiple projects; methods of knowledge transmission within the workshop, the confraternity, or court; and networks of learning.

Please send paper titles, abstracts (150 words), 3-5 keywords, and a curriculum vitae (max. 2 pages) to both Lindsay Dupertuis (ldupertu@umd.edu) and Caroline Paganussi (cpaganus@umd.edu) by August 1.

Tags:  Art History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italian Renaissance Art  Networks  Rhetoric  Visual Studies 

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Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater

Posted By Luca Zipoli, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, July 14, 2020

“Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater”

Organizer: Luca Zipoli (Scuola Normale Superiore), luca.zipoli@sns.it

Chair: Laura Benedetti (Georgetown University)

ABSTRACT: Torquato Tasso encountered an extraordinary fortune between the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 18th thanks to his epic masterpiece, La Gerusalemme liberata (Jerusalem delivered). During the Renaissance and then the Baroque era, the poem was read, appreciated, and commented upon, but it also enjoyed many forms of adaptations through a vast range of visual arts and media, from illustrated printed editions to operas, from paintings and frescoes to theatrical plays. This panel aims to investigate, through a multidisciplinary and trans-cultural approach, this multidimensional phenomenon by examining some of the newly discovered and most relevant case studies of the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata, from the Cinquecento up to c. 1700. The theoretical framework of this panel will be rooted in the up-to-date paradigms of the “adaptation studies” (e.g. Thomas Leitch et alii 2020, Linda Hutcheon 2013, Julie Sanders 2005), and we will seek to respond to some of these questions: which features made Tasso’s poem such a rich source for creative re-elaborations? What do the multifaceted appropriations of La Gerusalemme tell us about the Baroque aesthetics and the various cultures that inspired them? How can the studies on Tasso’s reception contribute to the general field of adaptation studies? The aim of this panel is to present scarcely known or neglected cases within the long tradition of adaptations from Tasso, while shedding a new light on more frequent themes through cutting-edge interpretations and a new theoretical benchmark.

This panel invites paper proposals which may include but are in no way limited to:

  • illustrated printed editions of La Gerusalemme liberata (e.g. the editions Castello 1590, 1604, and 1617, Ruffinelli 1607, and Tozzi 1628);
  • paintings, drawings, and artworks inspired by the epic poem (e.g. the cases of Annibale Carracci, Nicolas Poussin, and Antoon van Dyck);
  • theatrical, music, and operatic adaptations of Tasso’s masterpiece (e.g. the works by Giaches de Wert, Claudio Monteverdi, and Giulio Rospigliosi);

Please send paper proposals to Luca Zipoli (luca.zipoli@sns.it) by 10 August 2020. The submissions must include:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc, no longer than 5 pages);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Book History  Italian Literature  Music  Performing Arts and Theater  Print  Reception Theory  Tasso  Visual Studies 

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Renaissance Bergamo: At the Edge of the Venetian Terraferma

Posted By Emanuela Vai, Friday, July 10, 2020

Present day Bergamo is bifurcated into an upper and lower portion of the city by the Venetian walls, built in 1561-1623 to discourage Milanese northward expansion, as well as to limit contraband trade. Bergamo was one of the most important of the strong points fortified by the Venetian state in the sixteenth century, through its position at the end of the chain in acting as the true shield of all the other cities, as one of its officials described. Resting among the foothills of the Bergamasque Alps, it lies a mere twenty-five miles northeast of the Spanish duchy of Milan. Under Venetian rule, Bergamo was the westernmost fortress town of the Venetian Republic’s terraferma empire. In addition to the Milan/Venice border, Bergamo sat at an important crossroads between the Venetian Republic, German lands north of the Alps, and other Italian city states. This begs the question, why is a location such as Bergamo, crucial as both an interregional communication point between the Venetian Republic and other parts of the Italian peninsula, largely side-lined in Renaissance and Early Modern studies?

Recent studies in Renaissance geopolitics have highlighted the important strategic role of liminal cities and their function in wider socio-political landscapes. To this end, this CFP invites paper proposals for a series of interdisciplinary panels from scholars working in musicology, art history, cultural history, book history and material and visual culture studies looking at Bergamo at the dawn of the early modern period. The aim is to rethink and reassess critical perspectives within Venetian Studies from the analysis of the Venetian state’s borders, with a view to an edited collection on the subject.

Topics could include/address, but are not limited to:

  • Architectural languages
  • Codicology
  • Confraternity studies
  • Education studies
  • Mediation and circulation of music
  • New technologies and historical research
  • Practices of patronage, collecting and selling art
  • Regionalism, mobility and cultural exchanges
  • War history
  • Women’s studies

As per RSA guidelines, proposals should be submitted in English and should include:

  • Paper title (15-word max)
  • Full name, current affiliation, and email address
  • Keywords (4 max)
  • Abstract (150-word max)
  • Short bio (150 words)
  • Short CV (2-page max)

Please send your proposal to Emanuela Vai (Worcester College, Oxford) and Jason Rosenholtz-Witt (Northwestern University, Chicago) by Wednesday, 5 August 2020:

emanuela.vai@worc.ox.ac.uk

jasonkrw@gmail.com

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  lay brotherhoods  lay sisterhoods  Music  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Urban Studies  Veneto  Visual Studies 

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Early Modern Privacy?

Posted By Mette B. Bruun, Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Organizer: Centre for Privacy Studies, University of Copenhagen (www.teol.ku.dk/privacy)

 

Privacy is hardly a hallmark of Early Modern life. Rooms are crammed; beds are shared; doors are open; letters are copied; gossip runs wild; church and state survey the movements and mores of their subjects. Nonetheless, thresholds and boundaries do exist – be they material or immaterial ­– and they delineate spaces with regulated access, thus creating spaces with a particular potential for solitude, intimacy or a life without civic obligations.

In this panel, we will explore the terminologies, characteristics and ambience that pertain to Early Modern spaces of privacy. Perhaps such spaces are associated with terms related to ‘privacy’ or ‘the private’, and then it becomes a question how to identify the historical meaning of such terms. Perhaps such spaces are associated with emotions, activities or statuses that we think of as private or related to privacy, and it becomes a question how to avoid anachronism when dealing with them.

This panel is dedicated to spaces of privacy that are admired in poetry, explored in fiction, defined in legislation, identified in architectural plans, qualified in devotional treatises, represented in artworks, moulded in sermons or indicated in political theory. We are interested in spaces of privacy as they are built, furnished, adorned, portrayed, used, imagined, cultivated, restricted, protected, accessed, feared or lauded in the Early Modern period, and we are looking forward to learning more about scholarly approaches that enable us to grasp the complexities and historical particularities of such spaces.

To apply:

Please upload an abstract (150 words), a CV (3-5 pp) and, if relevant, a request for a travel bursary via this formhttps://teol.ku.dk/privacy/join-us/call-for-publications/panel-for-the-renaissance-society-of-america-conference-in-dublin-2021/panel/

Deadline 10 August

 

If you have questions, please contact Mette Birkedal Bruun, Professor of Church History at the University of Copenhagen and director of the Centre for Privacy Studies: mbb@teol.ku.dk

The speakers whose proposal are accepted will be expected to engage in a dialogue to enhance the cohesion of the panel.

 

Please note: Speakers must become RSA members by 1 November

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Closet Drama  Daily Life  Diaries  English Literature  Gardens  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  piety  poetics  Renaissance Architecture  sexuality  social history  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Theatres of Knowledge: On the Theatricalisation of Scientific Practices

Posted By Oscar Seip, Tuesday, July 7, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

Studying the intertwined history of the theatre and the sciences is crucial to understand the development of different styles and strategies that developed during the Early Modern Period for the discovery and presentation of knowledge. Indeed, previous scholarship has studied the importance of the locality of the theatre to understand how scientific practitioners acquired and disseminated knowledge. While this has focused on the anatomy theatre, its impact beyond the field of medicine has received relatively little consideration. In this panel, we explore the anatomy theatre in relation to a broader vision of the world as a theatre.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how the anatomy theatre relates to a hypothesised radical shift towards the theatricalisation of scientific practices. Did it lead to a new genre of printed works? Was it a new tool and practice of observing the world? Were these observations recorded and transmitted in a new and unique way?  How is the theatre different from contemporary metaphors such as the mirror and the book of nature? How does the theatre relate to the concepts of performance and spectacle? In other words, is there a distinctly theatrical style and strategy for the discovery and presentation of knowledge?

Our aim is to compare case studies of the theatre’s use across different periods (from the Early Modern period to the Enlightenment), fields of science or subjects (e.g. geography, medicine, architecture, mathematics), and different kinds of knowledge (practical or theoretical) and the different styles and strategies that they employ to represent this knowledge (figural/pictorial or abstract and textual). Particular attention will be given in this to the translation from the (imaginative) mental and physical space of the theatre to the space of the page.

We invite speakers (including junior scholars) from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. Proposals for 20-minute papers (no more than 150 words), together with a short CV should be sent to seip@biblhertz.it by 31 July 2020. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with any questions.

 

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Digital Humanities  Dissection  English Literature  European literature  History  History of Medicine  History of Science  Humanism  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Renaissance  Visual Studies 

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Landscape and Italian Renaissance Books of Poetry

Posted By Jakub Koguciuk, Wednesday, July 1, 2020

This panel aims to bring a rarely considered set of material to the study of landscape : Renaissance books of poetry. The rise of independent landscape painting is a classic subject in the study of Renaissance art. The development of pictorial naturalism and single-point perspective, among others, led to vivid evocations of the visual world. In contrast, historians of the book such as Sachiko Kusukawa explore how books of the period engage with knowledge of nature in innovative ways. Italian poets of the period created new literary forms of conceptualizing nature: from experiments in the dolce stil novo to the revival of ancient pastoral. All of these forms of literature were presented to readers in the form of books.

This panel invites scholars working at the intersection of book history, literary studies and the history of art. Examples of “landscapes” featured in Renaissance books include but are not limited to full-page images such as frontispieces, designs in the margins, maps, city views, emblematic images and other figural representations of nature. We are also interested in how potential and imagined landscapes interact with the materiality of the book. Potential papers may focus on manuscripts as well as printed books within the long period of 1300 to 1600. We welcome all approaches to landscape, from studies rooted in the visual, the verbal and the codicological, as well as considerations rooted in environmental humanities and ecocriticism.

Interested participants should send a title, abstract of 250 words (with relevant images) and a CV to Zoe Langer, NEH Postdoctoral Fellow - The Digital Piranesi, Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of South Carolina (zlanger@mailbox.sc.edu) and Jakub Koguciuk (jakub.koguciuk@aya.yale.edu) by July 21st, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Comparative Literature  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  Visual Studies 

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Women Worth Remembering: Female Models from Antiquity in the Visual Arts, c. 1350-c. 1650

Posted By Claudia Daniotti, Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

Antiquity has long offered a repository of exemplary models to look at, stories of notable figures whose lives and deeds provided examples of good or bad moral behaviour, and therefore guidance as to what emulate or avoid. This is particularly true in the late medieval to the Renaissance and early modern period, when attention was first drawn to Famous Women – rather than to Illustrious Men alone – and a flourishing visual tradition established around them, stemming from Boccaccio’s De mulieribus claris and Christine de Pizan’s Livre de la Cité des Dames. Figures as different as Penthesilea, Cleopatra, Lucretia, and Judith, among others, came to play particularly potent roles in European art from the mid-14th to the mid-17th century; their stories featured in a vast and varied corpus of paintings, manuscript and book illustrations, sculptures, tapestries, and a number of decorative objects in domestic interiors such as marriage chests and maiolica.

This panel seeks to explore the impact that these models from antiquity had on the developing notion of female identity between the late Middle Ages and the early modern period. It also aims to investigate more extensively the related iconographic tradition which, despite several recent scholarly publications and exhibitions, remains unevenly explored.

Proposals are invited to discuss examples of the visual reception of Famous Women in European art from c. 1350 to c. 1650, and to assess the kind of contribution these figures made to the formation of female identity in the period. While the panel focuses chiefly on figures from Greco-Roman myth and history, contributions on Famous Women from the Hebrew and Christian tradition (e.g., Biblical heroines and saints and martyrs) are also welcome. Paper topics might include but are not limited to: the visual tradition connected to collections of lives of women and educational treatises (e.g., Boccaccio, Christine de Pizan, Eustache Deschamps, Jacopo Filippo Foresti); case studies of medieval and Renaissance appropriations of Famous Women; the querelle des femmes; virtues and vices exemplified by representations of Famous Women.

Please submit proposals to Claudia Daniotti (Claudia.Daniotti@warwick.ac.uk) by 2 August 2020. They should include a paper title (max. 15 words), an abstract (max. 150 words), relevant keywords, a brief CV (max. one page, including your full name, affiliation, email address, and degree completion date, past or expected), and an indication of any audio/visual requirements you may have.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Classical Tradition  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Emblem Studies

Posted By Tamar Cholcman, Friday, June 26, 2020

Call for Papers

Discipline of Emblems
Renaissance Society of America 2021
Dublin
7–10 April 2021

The Discipline of Emblem Studies invites papers and panels for its sessions at the annual meeting (which may be on site or virtual). We may submit up to four panels. We invite papers and panels on any subject appropriate to our discipline and especially welcome those that address the following:

  • New perspectives on the origins of emblems
  • The whole is greater than the sum of its parts: Exceptions to the tripartite emblem
  • Emblems of the Unknown: Utopia and the New World
  • Emblems and the Republic of Letters
  • Emblems and Cosmology
  • New perspective on emblem books
  • Practice and theory of emblem digitization.
  • Jesuit emblems (in memory of G. Richard Dimler)

Panels must be organized by a current member of the Renaissance Society of America. Panels should ordinarily include no more than three presenters.

Please submit the following:

  • A session title no longer than 15 words;
  • 150 word abstract for description of the panel;
  • 150 word abstract for each of its papers;
  • 300 word curriculum vitae for each presenter, including full name, affiliation, and email address;
  • any audiovisual requirements;
  • session keywords.

Papers may be submitted by anyone. Graduate students should be doctoral candidates (post prelims).

Please submit the following in a single Word document:

  • 150 word abstract of the paper;
  • 300 word curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address;
  • any audiovisual requirements;
  • paper keywords.

Send all materials to Tamar Cholcman (cholcman@tauex.tau.ac.il). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America.

Please note: RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Art History  Book History  Cultural Networks  Digital Humanities  Discipline Representatives  Emblem  Emblems  Humanism  Jesuits  Literature  Neo-Latin Literature  Print  Visual Studies 

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Sequestration and the City: Confinement, Exclusion, and Enclosure

Posted By Jessica A. Stevenson Stewart, Monday, June 22, 2020

Although cities are fundamentally sites of connectivity, the pandemic-induced isolation of 2020 has renewed our awareness of the strain and tension that seclusion brings, especially in densely urbanized areas. This session draws on our recent experiences of the Covid19 crisis and revisits the history of urban disconnection and disconnectedness. Rather than focusing strictly on epidemics, we want to take a broader view of seclusion and sequestration as marked forms of social exclusion. While scholarship in the wake of mobility studies has expanded our understanding of the global flow of people, goods, and ideas, it has often overlooked social and spatial barriers that constrained movement, particularly within cities. For even though urban centers functioned as networks, they also instituted and perpetuated division, separation, and exclusion.

This session explores the spatial and representational means by which certain persons and groups were separated from the urban life around them, either voluntarily or involuntarily. We ask how zones or sites of separation were established within the city, and how the immobility of some interacted with the mobility of others. Such spaces may have been constructed by and for an individual, by civic authorities, or by groups formed with the intent of exclusivity. The confinement in question may have been a form of punishment (e.g., the prisoner, heretic, or exile), a means of quarantine (e.g., the leper or plague victim), a welcome and self-imposed withdrawal, (e.g., the individual in a “closet” or study), or an ethical detachment, (e.g., religious retreat behind walls or within cloisters). We ask whether urban configurations hid the excluded and isolated, or if their presence was known and even advertised.

What architecture, rituals, and representations kept the excluded bodies present and acknowledged in the urban psyche? How did the exclusion of some mark civic identity for others? How did the interior and exterior architecture of particular buildings enforce social separation? What forms of material culture accompanied the separated individual and were those objects part of what marked the person as apart from normative civic culture? When were seclusion and sequestration valued? What historical philosophies informed early modern conceptualizations of exclusion, seclusion, isolation, and confinement? What contemporary theories provide frameworks for understanding the psychological, social, and geographical valences of these experiences?

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief curriculum vitae by August 1 to Elizabeth Honig at elizahonig@yahoo.com and Jessica Stewart at sinopia@gmail.com

Session Keywords: Urban History, Immobility, Exclusion

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  History  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Material Studies  Religious Studies  Urban Studies  Visual Studies 

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Doubting Women: Women as Agents of Doubt in Early Modern Europe

Posted By Marco Faini, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

This panel aims to explore the role of women in fostering and disseminating doubts in early modern Europe. Doubt in Renaissance Europe was a flexible tool, employed to question official narratives, voice one’s ideas without openly stating them, to propose alternative versions of given facts, to promote dialogue, and to foster irenic ideals. Doubt could also be a means to shape one’s self in contrast with social roles and rules. In religious matters, doubt could become an instrument of self-defense against the delusions of the devil or against the temptation to believe oneself the recipient of special supernatural gifts. Women were traditionally considered prone to doubt and scruples. But what happened when women actively embraced doubt as an intellectual practice? This panel explores female figures – either real or fictional – who voiced, or even symbolically embodied, doubt(s) in a variety of fields, among which:

  • Religion
  • Social relations
  • Gender relations
  • Science and philosophy
  • Literature and art

Your proposal should include a title, a 150-word abstract, key-words (up to five), a one-paragraph CV (in prose, max. 300 words; please specify your PhD completion date, past or expected), and an indication of whether you have any audio / visual needs.

Please submit your proposal as well as any inquiries to Dr Marco Faini: marco.faini@unive.it by August 1 2020.

Tags:  history  literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Continental Law and Early Modern Visual Culture

Posted By Hayley Cotter, Tuesday, June 16, 2020
Updated: Friday, June 19, 2020

This session aims to foster conversation about the relationship between Continental law (civil, canon, or Roman) and early modern visual culture. Chaired by Dr. Valérie Hayaert, it specifically probes how images of justice were adapted to conform to local custom in order to retain their effectiveness. However, any topic that addresses early modern European law and visual culture (including but not limited to painting, sculpture, book illustration, and public murals) is welcome and will be considered for inclusion on the panel.

Please send the following to Hayley Cotter (hcotter@umass.edu) by 15 July 2020:

  • Full name and current affiliation
  • Paper title (15-word max)
  • Paper abstract (150-word max)
  • Curriculum vitae (5-page max)
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)

Accepted panelists will be notified by 20 July 2020.

The panel is sponsored by the Kinney Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Comparative Literature  History  Legal and Political Thought  Visual Studies 

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Violence, Trauma, and Memory: Warfare from the Hundred Years’ War to the Thirty Years’ War

Posted By Alexandra Onuf, Friday, June 12, 2020

This panel seeks to specifically examine the interwoven relationships between violence, trauma, and memory across the early modern period from the Hundred Years’ War (1337-1453) to the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648). Scholars have often assumed that medieval and early modern societies were so bellicose as to be inured to the consequences of trauma, or that they simply had no framework for processing its impacts. But recent scholarship has begun to reveal how the fields of memory studies and trauma theory, both of which originally focused on modern periods, can be fruitfully applied to the study of early modern communities. Literary scholars and historians in particular have probed the ways in which the violence and trauma of war were experienced, expressed and memorialized in early-modern discourse. The goal of this panel is to open up an interdisciplinary conversation on how trauma from and memories of war took shape in the early modern period in a variety of different forms and mediums, from individual diaries and personal accounts, to pamphlets and popular song, poetry, prints, or cartographic endeavors, to official chronicles or policies of oubliance. We hope to bring together scholars of literature, history, and visual culture whose work centers on the history of emotions, violence studies, and trauma theory. Taken together, these varied methodologies will offer a more nuanced understanding of how late medieval and early modern peoples experienced, processed and inscribed the violence of war into personal and collective memory and memorials.

Interested participants should send a paper title (25 word max.) and abstract (200 word max.), and a brief CV (2 pages max.) to Alexandra Onuf (onuf@hartford.edu) and Kate McGrath (mcgrathkae@ccsu.edu) by August 1, 2020.

Tags:  Art History  History  Literature  Memory Studies  Trauma Theory  Visual Studies 

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Architecture for the Common Good

Posted By Elizabeth M. Merrill, Thursday, June 11, 2020

During the recent health crisis, individuals across the globe have yielded to the intrusive politics of public authorities in the attempt to secure public health. Governing bodies highly controlled the movement and activities of their citizens, instructing them to stay at home, preventing them from meeting with friends and family members, sitting in parks, shopping and eating in restaurants. These intrusions on private liberties – and the questions they provoked from individuals as to accept them or not – brought back a central theme of political theory: that of the common good.

Since antiquity, the idea of the common good has problematized the shared political and social goal of communal well-being, which might or might not be in conflict with private interests. How to obtain this common good, in relation to private interests, recurs as an important question throughout the history of political theory. In these discussions, architectural patronage and design appear as important contributing factors in the obtainment of the common good. Architecture, urban planning and infrastructure development also incorporate innumerable tensions that exist between public and private interests.

This session invites papers that explore the “Architecture for the Common Good” in the Renaissance. Papers might focus on a primary-source text, examining the contribution of architecture to the public good. They might also present an architectural, urban or infrastructural project that hopes to contribute to the well-being of the community. Papers that specifically address the tensions that existed between public and private interests and that might have informed architectural patronage or design are likewise welcome.   

Please send proposals by 1 August 2020 via email with the subject line “RSA 2021” to Nele De Raedt (nele.deraedt@ugent.be) and Elizabeth Merrill at (elizabethmerrill11@gmail.com). The proposal should include a title (15 words max.); an abstract (200 words max.); and a one-paragraph CV (in prose, 200 words max.). Provide also full name, current affiliation, and email address.

This session is sponsored by the European Architectural Histories Network.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Associate Organizations  Classical Tradition  Italian Renaissance Art  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies 

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Renaissance Architecture in the Archives

Posted By Elizabeth M. Merrill, Thursday, June 11, 2020

 

For the purist, to know a building is to experience it first-hand, sensorily – to see its forms, to hear its echoes, to touch its surfaces, and to feel its spaces. Of course, history does not always allow for this full experience. For buildings of the early modern period – few of which survive, and even fewer, if any, in their “original” form – the historian must rely on “secondary” sources: drawings, commentaries and treatises, correspondence records, and contracts. It’s from the archives that the great histories of the Renaissance Europe’s iconic constructions unfold: the Duomo of Florence, St. Peter’s Basilica, the Royal Palace of Amsterdam, the Royal Site of El Escorial, the numerous palaces of merchant princes. The study of architecture through the archives likewise unveils works that would otherwise be invisible: constructions and monuments, long ago destroyed; ephemeral designs and stage scenery; unrealized feats of engineering; legal disputes; and theoretical debates. It’s in the archives that we also learn the extraordinary tales of the unsung protagonists of building design.   

 

For centuries, the archives of Renaissance architecture were largely fixed and immobile, providing scholars with a wealth of information – at times, electrifying, at times, terribly banal – of the history of the built environment. Yet the archives have evolved, slowly over the course of the twentieth century, and increasingly so in recent years. New technologies have changed how documents are located and accessed. Drawings, manuscripts and rare printed sources have not only been digitalized, but have also been made Open Access. Within the archive, scanning devices and cell-phone cameras allow the historian to assemble years’ worth of data in a single afternoon. Off-site, computer software facilitates the processes of cataloguing documents, and even their transcription and translation. Where previously extensive time, training, resources and patience were necessary to access the precious records of Renaissance architecture, now these treasures can be easily retrieved by even the casual researcher in a distant locale.

 

The changing nature of the archive introduces exciting new opportunities, but also caveats and questions. It’s clear that the virtual world is no real substitute for first-hand exploration: the accidental discoveries in the library or archive; the feel and sight of a drawing, manuscript or book; the shadows, the light, the sense of a place. For this panel, we invite papers that examine the “architecture in the archives” in its many forms and meanings. Papers might consider different archival sources and the light they shed on architectural history.  We welcome submissions that point to new directions in archival research or highlight recent findings. Papers might also reconsider or “re-read” published documents. We are equally interested in submissions that address research methodologies and the challenges brought about by new technologies.

 

Please send proposals by 1 August 2020 via email with the subject line “RSA 2021” to Nele De Raedt (nele.deraedt@ugent.be) and Elizabeth Merrill at (elizabethmerrill11@gmail.com). The proposal should include a title (15 words max.); an abstract (200 words max.); and a one-paragraph CV (in prose, 200 words max.). Provide also full name, current affiliation, and email address.

 

This session is sponsored by the European Architectural Histories Network.


Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Associate Organizations  Digital Humanities  Italian Renaissance Art  Visual Studies 

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