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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA and select "Add New Post" at the top of this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Gender and Death in the Late Middle Ages and Early Modernity

Posted By Enrique Fernandez, Wednesday, June 3, 2020
Gender and Death in the late middle ages and early modernity

Call for proposals on how the category of gender survived, disappeared or was transformed in contact with death in the late medieval and early modern period.

Proposal of how the differentiation based on the categories male/female was maintained, effaced or subsumed within other contemporary categories when dealing with dead bodies, their cult, conservation, etc. Discussions of how Laqueur's one-sex model is supported or undermined by social practices that compensated for the dead bodies' lack of agency to "perform" or "do gender."

Studies of wills, funeral procedures, burials, relics, anatomical dissection, representations of death and afterlife etc. are some of the documents and practices that can be analyzed in the proposal.

Send 200 word proposal by August 1 2020 to

Enrique Fernandez, enrique_fernandez@umanitoba.ca

University of Manitoba

Tags:  death and gender  History  Women and Gender 

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Society for the Study of Early Modern Women & Gender Call for Panel Proposals

Posted By Courtney K. Quaintance, Sunday, May 31, 2020

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women & Gender (https://ssemwg.org) will sponsor up to three panels at next year’s annual conference of the Renaissance Society of America (RSA), to be held in Dublin, Ireland, on 7-10 April 2021. The SSEMWG supports and promotes inclusive and creative scholarship on women and gender across the early modern world. We are committed to interdisciplinary, intersectional approaches that are historically sensitive and theoretically exploratory.

The Society is soliciting proposals for pre-formed panels (or roundtables) in any discipline that explore women and their contributions to the cultural, political, economic, or social spheres of the early modern period and whose interest in it includes attention to gender and representations of women. Proposals that include young/emerging scholars are especially welcome.

Sponsorship of a panel (or roundtable) by the SSEMWG signifies that it is pre-approved and automatically accepted for presentation at the RSA annual meeting.

Proposals for a pre-formed panel, linked panels, or roundtable should be sent to Courtney Quaintance (courtney.quaintance@gmail.com), SSEMWG associate organization representative for RSA, by no later than Monday 5 August 2020 with the following materials, assembled into a single Word document (no PDFs, please). Careful adherence to these guidelines is greatly appreciated:

  • Title of panel (or roundtable) (max 15 words)
  • Abstract (max 150 words) describing the panel (or roundtable) + keywords
  • General discipline area of panel (or roundtable) (History, Art History, Literature, or other)
  • For a panel proposal: names of Organizer(s), Chair, Paper Presenters, & any Respondent(s), including current affiliation + email address for each participant
  • For a roundtable proposal: names of Organizer(s), Chair, and Discussants (min 4, max 8), including current affiliation and email address for each participant
  • CV for Panel or Roundtable Organizer(s) & Paper Presenters only (5 pages max per person, not in prose), indicating PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • For each panel paper: title (max 15 words), abstract (max 150 words) & keywords (up to 4)
  • Specification of any audio/visual needs

Please note that, per RSA rules, all panels and roundtables must include at least one scholar who is postdoctoral, and that participants who are currently graduate students should be within one or two years of defending their dissertations. For complete RSA guidelines for panel and roundtable proposals, please consult this page.

Decisions regarding SSEMWG panel sponsorship will be sent out at least four days prior to the regular RSA submission deadline (15 August 2020) for submission of panel or paper proposals.

Applicants for SSEMWG panel sponsorship do not need to be Society members at the time of submission, but, if successful, all members of the panel should join the Society before the 2021 RSA meeting. Regular membership costs USD$25; students, independent scholars and contingent faculty may join for USD$15. Participants are also expected to be/become RSA members and to register for the conference and are responsible for covering their own travel and lodging costs. Limited travel grants are available to members of the Renaissance Society of America.

Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.

All best,

Courtney

Courtney Quaintance
courtney.quaintance@gmail.com

Tags:  Women and Gender 

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Strong Women in Early Modern Iberian Art

Posted By Julia M. Vázquez, Wednesday, May 27, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Thanks to recent exhibitions, publications, and museum acquisitions, women have come roaring back into view in the history of early modern art. This panel seeks to focus this renewed attention onto women from across the Iberian world—that is, the areas under the control of the Spanish Hapsburgs, stretching beyond the Iberian Peninsula to include viceregal regions like the Kingdom of Naples, New Spain, and Peru.

The early modern Iberian world featured women artists of extraordinary accomplishment, including Artemisia Gentileschi, Sofonisba Anguissola, Luisa Roldán, Josefa de Óbidos, and Isabel de Cisneros. Strong women also acted on the history of art as its patronesses. Eleanor of Toledo and Queen Mariana of Austria are among the noblewomen whose power was visible in their portraits and in their substantial commissions from contemporary artists. Religious institutions also produced female figures who were memorialized in several different media. These include Sor Juana Iñez de la Cruz in New Spain; St. Rose of Lima in Peru; and St. Teresa of Ávila in Spain, who in addition founded the Convent of Las Descalzas Reales in Madrid, now a major museum. On the European continent and in the New World, women were thus present in early modern art as its creators, benefactors, and subjects.

This panel invites papers addressing the role of women in and their contribution to the history of art across the Iberian world from any one of a number of viewpoints. These could include, among others, artforms usually commissioned by and for women or otherwise coded as feminine, such as escudos de monja; the way that women artists and patronesses are narrativized in vite and other forms of art writing; and categories of inclusion and exclusion, such as the amateur.

Interested participants should send a paper title and abstract (200 words) and a CV to Julia Vázquez (jmv2153@columbia.edu) by August 1, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Women and Gender 

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