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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

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Posted By Samantha J. Hughes-Johnson, Monday, August 3, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

(Deadline: 10 August 2020)

 

The Society for Confraternity Studies will sponsor a number of sessions at the 67thAnnual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (7- 10 April 2021) in Dublin. Accordingly, it invites proposals for papers on the following theme:

 

Contagium: Exploring the Nexus Between Confraternity, Pandemic and Renaissance Society

 

 

Since global communities are currently experiencing the liminal stage of withdrawing from varying degrees of quarantine and social isolation, the Society for Confraternity Studies is keen to scrutinize how Renaissance lay charitable institutions and sodalities grappled with the corporeal, emotional and fiscal injuries caused by society’s exposure to pandemics and epidemics and how their various actions can inform our own social, economic and psychological recuperation. Accordingly, we invite papers that explore the breadth and impact of lay sodalities operating in affected geographical areas between 1300 and 1700. Papers might focus on, but are not limited to the following topics:

  • The impact of pandemics on the restrictions of goods and humans and how quarantines, social distancing and limitations on travel affected regular confraternity operations and in turn, touched recipients of charity.
  • Legacies and donations awarded to confraternities in light of the plague. Including comparative studies of bequests during times of epidemic and good fortune and those that juxtapose geographically disparate data for the purpose of analysis.
  • The orientation of medical science and spiritual doctrine during epidemics and lay charitable institutions’ roles in this co-ordination.
  • Artistic commissions of confraternities and other lay charitable institutions and how these reflected the various injuries caused to society by outbreaks of pestilence. 
  • The impact of post-plague art, architecture, drama, music and ephemera commissioned by confraternities on public spaces and/or the popular conscience.
  • The actual and notional value of prophylactic measures designed to protect the body and soul during outbreaks and to what extent these were taken up by lay brotherhoods.
  •  Confraternity membership and how this was affected by one or more of the following: fear of mass burial; church and oratory closure; fear of the afterlife; concerns regarding spiritual conduct in the face of imminent death. 
  • The personal toll of plague on those lay brothers and sisters entrusted with public service, healthcare and the custody of people or objects.
  • The influence of pestilence on public and private confraternal ritual. 

 

Papers should concentrate on confraternal activities between 1300 and 1700. We are however, also particularly interested in proposals that discuss the value of emerging confraternity studies focusing on historical pandemics and how their findings can inform our own twenty-first century recuperation following our recent encounter with Covid 19. 

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email, the paper title (no longer than 15 words), the abstract of the paper (no longer than 150 words), a short academic C.V. (between one and five pages), and a series of key-words that suit the presentation. Please be sure all seven (7) categories of information are clearly provided. 

Please submit your proposal to Dr Samantha J.C. Hughes-Johnson at samanthajanecaroline@yahoo.co.uk by [10 August 2020].


Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  black death  bubonic plague  charity  confraternity  death and gender  Death studies  History  History of Medicine  history of science  hospitals  interdiscplinary  Italian Renaissance Art  lay sisterhoods  Material Studies  Medicine and Science  Performing Arts and Theater  piety  Religious Studies  Renaissance  renaissance medicine  ritual  Women and Gender 

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In the Margins: Hidden Thinkers and Makers in Early Modern Scientific Texts

Posted By Michelle DiMeo, Monday, July 27, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Panel Title: In the Margins: Hidden Thinkers and Makers in Early Modern Scientific Texts

Session Organizers:

Michelle DiMeo, Ph.D., Director of the Othmer Library, Science History Institute

Megan Piorko, Candidate*, Allington Postdoctoral Fellow, Science History Institute 

Early modern scientific manuscripts and printed texts are filled with material evidence of practitioners working through the technical knowledge presented on the page. When a text was subsequently copied, the knowledge created in the margins of the text was frequently subsumed into the reproduced copy, allowing readers to add to the canon of knowledge. Similarly, heavily annotated texts were shared between friends and among intellectual circles, showing that marginal notes were not at all marginal to the knowledge-making process. However, many of these readers, thinkers, and makers who contributed to advancing scientific knowledge are anonymous to us today. How does our treatment of known and unknown readers’ responses to scientific texts inform the study of early modern knowledge creation? What can we learn from early modern voices that have been relegated to the margins? What new methodologies are required for us to identify and recover these hidden thinkers and makers? Some examples of topics might include (but are in no way limited to):

• Evidence of readership and ownership of scientific texts

• Anonymous authors and annotators, especially women

• Popular culture responses to scientific texts

• Material evidence of tacit knowledge on the page

• Interaction between print and manuscript cultures

• New methodologies for history of the book scholarship that illuminate marginalized intellectual actors

This panel is sponsored by the Science History Institute, an RSA Associate Organization. Acceptance onto this panel guarantees acceptance by the RSA. 

To propose a paper, please send a paper title (15-word maximum), an abstract (150-word maximum), curriculum vitae (no longer than 5 pages; please include date of PhD expected or completed), and full name, current affiliation, and email address by August 10th to Michelle DiMeo (mdimeo@sciencehistory.org) and Megan Piorko (meganpiorko@gmail.com).

Tags:  Book History  History of Science  interdiscplinary  Materials and Materiality  Medicine and Science  Women and Gender 

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Gendered Sins: Vices in Spanish Literature in the Light of Moral and Medical Casuistry

Posted By Marlen Bidwell-Steiner, Friday, July 17, 2020

Early Modern Spanish imaginary literature very often yields a peculiar economy of violation and punishment. Some perpetrators get through without sanctions; apparently innocent protagonists become suspects and consequently victims in a disturbing system of "poetic justice"; and yet others have to accept an unrewarding settlement to restore the social order. In Spanish literature, honor or honra are the markers for male social integrity, whereas shame sticks primarily to the female body. Thus, the performed imaginary sanctions are deeply gendered. Yet, they are not mere mimetic reproductions of the norms and rules imposed by religious and/or secular power: they rather negotiate gaps between conflicting (or even superseded) ideas within Post-Tridentine society. Such negotiations intertwine with and echo the debates in other prominent textual genres of the time: manuals of confession and philosophical and medical treatises referring to the Querelle des femmes (or better: Querelle des sexes).

This panel will investigate such negotiations of the specific gendered nature of vices in novels, novellas, comedias on the one hand and penitential and theoretical texts on the other. Differing approaches and incongruent perceptions of honor and self-esteem may help to detect the (re)shaping of subjectivity and the gender regimes of a society in change.

We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history to submit papers. Please send proposals via email with the subject line “Casuistry Dublin” to marlen.bidwell-steiner@univie.ac.at by 5 August 2020. The proposal should include a title (15 words max.); an abstract (200 words max.); and a short CV with full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Tags:  Casuistry  Hispanic Literature  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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Queenly Architectural Patronage: Cooperation and Conflict

Posted By Sarah W. Lynch, Friday, July 17, 2020

Although the study of queenly patronage has made huge progress over the last decades, a fundamental methodological problem still consists in analysing the cooperation of royal couples. How can the queen’s contribution to joint projects be documented? To what extent did queens create their own patronage network and import traditions from their country / court of origin? What is the evidence for their support of or rivalry with their husbands’ initiatives? The panel seeks to shed light on these questions through fresh case studies concerning both ecclesiastical and secular architecture. In addition, papers dealing with independent architectural commissions by queens regnant, queen consorts or dowager queens are all welcome.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Motivations, aims and functions of queenly architectural patronage
  • The impact of the queen’s patronage networks on architectural projects
  • Cultural transfer instigated by exchanges with the queen’s court of origin
  • Models and norms informing the architectural patronage of queens (as opposed to kings)
  • Cooperation / conflict in the architectural patronage of king and queen
  • Methodological issues regarding the cooperation of royal couples

If you are interested, please send an abstract to Christina Strunck (christina.strunck@fau.de) by 13 August. Submissions need to contain the following information:

  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (no longer than 5 pages)
  • PhD or other terminal degree completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

For more information about the RSA Annual Meeting, please see the conference website: https://www.rsa.org/page/RSADublin2021

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Cultural Networks  Cultural Transfer  Patronage  Queens  Women and Gender 

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Seduction and Courtship Rituals in Renaissance Italy

Posted By Marlisa den Hartog, Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Temptation and seduction are somewhat gendered words. In the context of the premodern courtship ritual, the more passive temptation part, allowing oneself to be looked at, is mostly played by women, whereas the seduction part, actively doing something to seduce the other, such as following them around or serenading them, is mostly played by men.This is, however, not exclusively the case. Sometimes women use active seduction techniques such as sending letters and gifts (in Italian novella stories), or impressing the other with martial skill (in romance epics). Likewise, young men may sometimes be described as tempting others by means of their clothes and hairstyles (although this is mostly within a homosexual context).

The behavioral codes for love affairs appear to be gendered as well. The code of conduct for women prescribed them to resist their suitors for as long as they could, in order to test their lovers, turning sex into an instrument of power, but also in order to appear chaste and modest. Men on the other hand were advised that in order to be successful in love, they had to be persistent and resilient – eventually, their beloved would give in, and if all else failed they were allowed to use force. Gendered behavioral codes that may have given rise to what is now called a rape culture.

With this panel, I would like to invite fellow scholars to engage with this topic, and open mindedly discuss the gendered nature of seduction rituals in Renaissance Italy. Who took the initiative in these affairs? What type of techniques were women believed to use to “tempt” men, and what techniques did men use to “seduce” women? What behavioral codes existed for these rituals? Who took the initiative to have sex, and who was passive, and who was active during sex? And, finally, how much agency do we think men and women had in these affairs? Through these questions, this panel will engage with discussions on gender identity and agency, as well as issues of consent and the normalization of a rape culture.

The goal of this panel is to gather a diverse group of scholars working with different types of source material, including literary genres such as romance, theater plays, novella collections, treatises on love, pornography/erotica, but also visual sources, personal correspondence and legal documents. It would be interesting to reconstruct and compareassumptions about the “sexual nature” of men and women (and how they were likely to behave), with behavioral codes about how men and women should behave, and, if possible, with examples of how men and women actually behaved. Of course, “men” and “ women”should not be seen as universals here. Much rather, it might be valuable to look for diversity in men and women of different ages, social classes, ethnicity, and within homo- as well as heterosexual relationships.  

Please send paper proposals to Marlisa den Hartog (m.i.den.hartog@hum.leidenuniv.nl) by 10 August 2020. The submissions must include:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc, no longer than 5 pages);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Tags:  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Sexuality  Women and Gender 

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Lists in Early Modern Women’s Writing: Life and Literature *extended deadline*

Posted By Nikolina Hatton, Friday, July 10, 2020
Updated: Monday, August 3, 2020

Lists proliferate in texts written by women and texts written about women, from the typical enumeration of “women worthies” within the querelle des femmes tradition to the lists of possessions and household accounts found in early modern commonplace books. Within women’s writing itself, functional everyday lists and literary lists sometimes merge, such as in Isabella Whitney’s “The Maner of her Wyll”—a poetic description of and reflection on London in the form of a Last Will and Testament.  

This panel seeks to reflect on the forms and functions of the list within early modern women’s writings and everyday lives. Literary studies has seen a recent resurgence of interest in the list, as scholars have noted the list’s ability to bring together questions of functionality and literariness. Scholars have shown that, as a form that deceptively appears simpler than it really is, the list and examinations of it shed light on the evolution and manipulation of literary conventions and can further signal important discursive distinctions between texts that at first feel otherwise quite similar. Such a project intersects well with the study of women’s writing in the early modern period, not only because lists appear so often in investigations into women’s everyday lives, but also because the corpus of literature by women is generally marked by subtle but significant deviations within the genres deemed acceptable for women writers. In material culture studies as well, the list has been hailed as an affordance for accomplishing everyday tasks as well as a container that emphasizes metonymy and materiality over metaphorical meanings. This panel seeks to open up these questions by broadly investigating the use of the list within early modern women’s utilitarian and literary writings.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send your paper’s title (max 15 words), a short abstract (150 words), your CV, and institutional affiliation/contact details to Nikolina Hatton (n.hatton@lmu.de) by 10 August 2020. A longer abstract may also be included in addition.

Tags:  Book History  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Daily Life  Diaries  Ekphrasis  English Literature  fiction  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Global Literature  History  interdiscplinary  Italian Literature  Libraries  Material Culture  Material Studies  Materiality  Memory Studies  networks  poetry  Portuguese Literature  Print  Spanish literature  Women and Gender 

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Early Modern Privacy?

Posted By Mette B. Bruun, Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Organizer: Centre for Privacy Studies, University of Copenhagen (www.teol.ku.dk/privacy)

 

Privacy is hardly a hallmark of Early Modern life. Rooms are crammed; beds are shared; doors are open; letters are copied; gossip runs wild; church and state survey the movements and mores of their subjects. Nonetheless, thresholds and boundaries do exist – be they material or immaterial ­– and they delineate spaces with regulated access, thus creating spaces with a particular potential for solitude, intimacy or a life without civic obligations.

In this panel, we will explore the terminologies, characteristics and ambience that pertain to Early Modern spaces of privacy. Perhaps such spaces are associated with terms related to ‘privacy’ or ‘the private’, and then it becomes a question how to identify the historical meaning of such terms. Perhaps such spaces are associated with emotions, activities or statuses that we think of as private or related to privacy, and it becomes a question how to avoid anachronism when dealing with them.

This panel is dedicated to spaces of privacy that are admired in poetry, explored in fiction, defined in legislation, identified in architectural plans, qualified in devotional treatises, represented in artworks, moulded in sermons or indicated in political theory. We are interested in spaces of privacy as they are built, furnished, adorned, portrayed, used, imagined, cultivated, restricted, protected, accessed, feared or lauded in the Early Modern period, and we are looking forward to learning more about scholarly approaches that enable us to grasp the complexities and historical particularities of such spaces.

To apply:

Please upload an abstract (150 words), a CV (3-5 pp) and, if relevant, a request for a travel bursary via this formhttps://teol.ku.dk/privacy/join-us/call-for-publications/panel-for-the-renaissance-society-of-america-conference-in-dublin-2021/panel/

Deadline 10 August

 

If you have questions, please contact Mette Birkedal Bruun, Professor of Church History at the University of Copenhagen and director of the Centre for Privacy Studies: mbb@teol.ku.dk

The speakers whose proposal are accepted will be expected to engage in a dialogue to enhance the cohesion of the panel.

 

Please note: Speakers must become RSA members by 1 November

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Closet Drama  Daily Life  Diaries  English Literature  Gardens  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  piety  poetics  Renaissance Architecture  sexuality  social history  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Women Worth Remembering: Female Models from Antiquity in the Visual Arts, c. 1350-c. 1650

Posted By Claudia Daniotti, Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

Antiquity has long offered a repository of exemplary models to look at, stories of notable figures whose lives and deeds provided examples of good or bad moral behaviour, and therefore guidance as to what emulate or avoid. This is particularly true in the late medieval to the Renaissance and early modern period, when attention was first drawn to Famous Women – rather than to Illustrious Men alone – and a flourishing visual tradition established around them, stemming from Boccaccio’s De mulieribus claris and Christine de Pizan’s Livre de la Cité des Dames. Figures as different as Penthesilea, Cleopatra, Lucretia, and Judith, among others, came to play particularly potent roles in European art from the mid-14th to the mid-17th century; their stories featured in a vast and varied corpus of paintings, manuscript and book illustrations, sculptures, tapestries, and a number of decorative objects in domestic interiors such as marriage chests and maiolica.

This panel seeks to explore the impact that these models from antiquity had on the developing notion of female identity between the late Middle Ages and the early modern period. It also aims to investigate more extensively the related iconographic tradition which, despite several recent scholarly publications and exhibitions, remains unevenly explored.

Proposals are invited to discuss examples of the visual reception of Famous Women in European art from c. 1350 to c. 1650, and to assess the kind of contribution these figures made to the formation of female identity in the period. While the panel focuses chiefly on figures from Greco-Roman myth and history, contributions on Famous Women from the Hebrew and Christian tradition (e.g., Biblical heroines and saints and martyrs) are also welcome. Paper topics might include but are not limited to: the visual tradition connected to collections of lives of women and educational treatises (e.g., Boccaccio, Christine de Pizan, Eustache Deschamps, Jacopo Filippo Foresti); case studies of medieval and Renaissance appropriations of Famous Women; the querelle des femmes; virtues and vices exemplified by representations of Famous Women.

Please submit proposals to Claudia Daniotti (Claudia.Daniotti@warwick.ac.uk) by 2 August 2020. They should include a paper title (max. 15 words), an abstract (max. 150 words), relevant keywords, a brief CV (max. one page, including your full name, affiliation, email address, and degree completion date, past or expected), and an indication of any audio/visual requirements you may have.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Classical Tradition  Humanism  Italian Renaissance Art  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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The Burden of Blood in Early Modern Spain

Posted By Amy E. Sheeran, Thursday, June 25, 2020

Although blood, as a symbol, has always been replete with meanings, in the context of early modern Spain, it becomes uniquely potent. This panel seeks to consider blood as a category of representational analysis, following the lead of Gil Anidjar and Joan Scott. In particular, within the context of the ideology of blood purity with its attention to blood’s content, origin, and legibility, representations of blood are evocative and layered. Recent attention to the history of blood purity statutes and their influence, as well as to the role of blood in shaping national, imperial, and religious identity in Spain, prompts further analysis of blood’s discursive potential in the early modern Iberian world. In this panel, we aim to consider how representational works approach and articulate the multilayered meanings blood allows in this context. We welcome interdisciplinary submissions focused on literary, historical, or visual works that consider medical and scientific knowledge; blood and its relation to race; the role of blood in signaling or establishing class; theological questions and debates; blood as a nexus of gender and sexuality, and other related concerns.

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with a proposed title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief CV to Amy Sheeran at sheeran1@otterbein.edu and Rachel Burk at rburk@ndm.edu by August 1.

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Nobility  Religion  Spanish Empire  theology  Women and Gender 

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**Deadline extended 8/10** SHARP at RSA: Intersectional Book History

Posted By Andie Silva, Monday, June 22, 2020
Updated: Thursday, August 6, 2020

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will sponsor up to four sessions at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting in Dublin, Ireland on 7-10 April, 2021. SHARP @ RSA brings together scholars working on any aspect of the creation, dissemination, and reception of manuscript and print and their digital remediation. Special consideration will be given to early career scholars and BIPOC applicants.

The proposed theme for this year is “Intersectional Book History.” This theme reflects ongoing conversations about engaging our work in broader political and social contexts that move the field forward and look to the needs and goals of the next generation of book history scholars. What work are we doing to centralize and call attention to under-studied, under-represented texts and authors? How has book history contributed to upholding hegemonic, exclusionary systems, and what can be done to disrupt this? What does it take to promote a book history that is radical, inclusive, and accessible?

We invite individual submissions or fully constituted panels/roundtables about the study or remediation of books and manuscripts from 1350 to 1700 across a range of perspectives, especially work that focuses on global perspectives. Roundtables may also consider provocations, theories, and new questions orienting the field. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Decolonial approaches to book history and/or print culture
  • Archival studies of underrepresented authors or understudied texts
  • Feminist and Queer bibliography
  • Racialized and gendered labor in/and book production and its digital remediations
  • Women in/and the print marketplace (stationers, printers, authors, readers)
  • Decolonizing book history pedagogy

Please send a 150-word abstract and a brief CV to Dr. Andie Silva (asilva@york.cuny.edu) by 10 August (note that this is earlier than the RSA’s own deadline). Accepted applicants must be members of SHARP by the time they register for the RSA conference but if you are experiencing financial instability please do not let that keep you from applying! SHARP and RSA are both open to discussing flexible dues.

Please consider the following RSA guidelines before applying:

  • You must be a member of the RSA by the time you register for the conference. RSA will be taking into consideration the financial strains put on many due to the COVID-19 pandemic. If you are concerned about the cost of membership, please get in touch with RSA to discuss alternatives.
  • Graduate students must be within two years of defending their dissertations to be considered as speakers.
  • Individuals may submit only one paper for consideration (including rollovers from 2020). This paper may be an independent proposal, a paper proposed for a seminar session, or part of an organized panel.

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Tags:  Book History  Digital Humanities  Emerging Scholars  Global Literature  Material Culture  Women and Gender 

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Doubting Women: Women as Agents of Doubt in Early Modern Europe

Posted By Marco Faini, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

This panel aims to explore the role of women in fostering and disseminating doubts in early modern Europe. Doubt in Renaissance Europe was a flexible tool, employed to question official narratives, voice one’s ideas without openly stating them, to propose alternative versions of given facts, to promote dialogue, and to foster irenic ideals. Doubt could also be a means to shape one’s self in contrast with social roles and rules. In religious matters, doubt could become an instrument of self-defense against the delusions of the devil or against the temptation to believe oneself the recipient of special supernatural gifts. Women were traditionally considered prone to doubt and scruples. But what happened when women actively embraced doubt as an intellectual practice? This panel explores female figures – either real or fictional – who voiced, or even symbolically embodied, doubt(s) in a variety of fields, among which:

  • Religion
  • Social relations
  • Gender relations
  • Science and philosophy
  • Literature and art

Your proposal should include a title, a 150-word abstract, key-words (up to five), a one-paragraph CV (in prose, max. 300 words; please specify your PhD completion date, past or expected), and an indication of whether you have any audio / visual needs.

Please submit your proposal as well as any inquiries to Dr Marco Faini: marco.faini@unive.it by August 1 2020.

Tags:  history  literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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The Renaissance Gallery

Posted By Andrea M. Gáldy, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Call for Papers

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

International Forum Collecting & Display

The Renaissance Gallery

Ever since the ground-breaking publications by Wolfram Prinz (1970) and Rosalys Coope (1986), the renaissance gallery has been investigated by art historians and historians of collecting as an architectural setting, as well as a room for display. The focus has been either on the general phenomenon or on individual case studies. Quite different from our modern perception of the gallery as a museum space for paintings or a commercial space used for trading in art, during the Renaissance, a gallery fulfilled a wider range of functions and displayed a much more diverse group of items than they do today.

Renaissance galleries were coveted by many but only owned by the nobility, males and occasionally females. Aristocratic owners displayed items that were in keeping with a particular collectors’ standard in close proximity to other collecting rooms such as libraries and armouries. Some galleries had a themed display that went hand in hand with a decorative programme devised by owner and court artists. Our sessions will therefore focus on different uses of the gallery, changes in terminology and architectural evolution. We are also interested in galleries created for women.

We invite proposals that present new approaches to issues of room type, diverse development, function, set-up, decoration and contents in a pan-European context, as well as with the gallery’s potential role for museology and museum displays.

If you wish to participate, please send your abstracts of 250 words and short bios (no CVs) by 15 July 2020 to collecting_display@hotmail.com.

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Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  British Empire  Classical Tradition  Digital Humanities  Italian Renaissance Art  Material Culture  Material Studies  Women and Gender 

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Women, Domesticity and Closet Drama in Early Modern England

Posted By Aurelie Griffin, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

We are seeking proposals for an Epistémè-sponsored panel at RSA Dublin, 2021, entitled ‘Women, Domesticity and Closet Drama in Early Modern England’. This panel seeks to examine women’s agency in closet drama by questioning its definition as a ‘domestic’ genre. Closet drama is traditionally defined in opposition to commercial theatre, by pitting professional companies performing in front of a wide, mostly anonymous audience against amateur writers and actors performing for a restricted audience of families and friends within the home. This domestic context enabled women to perform at least some of the parts in plays that portray and usually focus on complex female characters, allowing them to break to a certain extent from the social constraints of the early modern stage, from which women were barred. Yet closet drama often engages with political, societal and historical issues, using the protected space of the home to reflect upon the wider cultural environment in which it takes place. Although these plays were first devised for a restricted circle, then circulated in manuscript form, they were also usually published – most notably those written by women: Mary Sidney Herbert’s Antonius (1592) and Elizabeth Cary’s The Tragedy of Mariam (1613). Those are usually considered as respectively the first and last of the corpus, which also comprises Fulke Greville’s Mustapha (1596) and Alaham (1601), Thomas Kyd’s Cornelia (1594) or Samuel Daniel’s Philotas (1604), among others. To what extent, therefore, can such plays be called ‘domestic’? How do they make use of the specificities of a private, enclosed space for their own production? What role(s) did the materiality of the home play in the creation of these plays, and did it influence the materiality of the texts themselves? How does closet drama challenge our understanding of what is private and what is public, and how did women in particular make use of such ambiguities to explore certain issues, affirm their own voices and legitimise their authorship? Despite the generalising phrase, ‘closet drama’, the corpus brings together plays whose similarities should not eclipse their differences, so that the responses to these questions will not necessarily be the same for all of the plays in the corpus. We are inviting proposals for examinations of individual plays, comparative and cross-cultural approaches, as well as gender and material-oriented perspectives. 

150-word abstracts, together with a one-page CV (indicating current affiliation and a valid email address) can be sent by July 15, 2020 to Aurélie Griffin : aurelie.griffin@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr

Tags:  Closet Drama  Material Studies  Performing Arts and Theater  Women and Gender 

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Women Religious and the Project of Empire

Posted By Alexandra C. Verini, Friday, June 12, 2020

In recent decades, increasing attention has been paid to the political and literary contributions of early modern nuns. Such research has ably demonstrated that, despite mandates of enclosure, Catholic women religious were active in the world, playing key roles in political resistance, in nation formation and in colonial expansion. Seeking to expand this research geographically and temporally, this panel invites new work on the engagement of early modern women religious across the globe, whether as collaborators or resisters, in colonialist and imperialist projects and in their afterlives. How were the lives of women religious whether in the Spanish New World or in New France entangled with colonialist aims? How do the traces of institutions started by early modern women, such as Mary Ward’s Loreto Institute, emerge within the British Empire? What might reading Catholic women’s religious orders alongside imperialism and colonialism reveal about the intersection between religion and politics in the early modern period and beyond? What impact did these women’s communities have on religious, pedagogical, and nationalist agendas within the project of empire and its aftermaths? 

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alexandra.verini@ashoka.edu.in by July 31st:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract (no longer than 150 words)
  • A single page CV

**All speakers must become RSA members before the conference. In addition, because this is being submitted for consideration as a sponsored panel, all accepted speakers must also become members of the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender.

Tags:  British Empire  French Empire  History  Portuguese Empire  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Women and Gender 

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Magical Materials

Posted By Rebekah T. Compton, Wednesday, June 10, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Magical Materials

Dublin, Ireland, April 7-10, 2021

The theory of natural or astral magic is based on the belief that God emanates powers through the spheres of the planets and the fixed stars, down to earth, and into its matter. In Marsilio Ficino’s Three Books on Life and in the Picatrix, the word virtue—a term derived from the Latin word vis or power—is employed to describe the investment of celestial agency into terrestrial matter. This session seeks to examine the occult or secret virtues believed to be contained within materials and the use of these materials in image-based, natural, astral, and theurgic forms of magic.

A material's spiritual potency could be enhanced through the use of inscriptions, symbols, rituals, suffumigations, and/or prayers. Moreover, illicit materials—including human body parts and fluids— could be wielded for maleficent forms of sorcery. This panel invites papers addressing magical materials in the early modern period. Topics might include celestial likenesses and talismans; petitions for love, fertility, or childbirth; perfumes and pharmacology; ritual performances; representations of magical practices; sympathetic resonances and the soul's ascent; or the writings of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, Marsilio Ficino, the Picatrix, Hermes Trismegistus, or Iamblichus.

Please send a paper title, abstract (150 words max), a short CV, and A/V requirements to the session organizer Rebekah Compton at rebekahcompton@gmail.com. All presenters must register for the Annual Renaissance Society of America Meeting. The deadline for submission of materials to this panel is July 29, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  English Literature  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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