This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
Print Page   |   Sign In   |   Register
RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
Blog Home All Blogs

This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA and select "Add New Post" at the top of this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  History  Italian Renaissance Art  Book History  Italian Literature  English Literature  Women and Gender  Comparative Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Philosophy  Performing Arts and Theater  Humanism  Material Culture  Neo-Latin Literature  Religious Studies  Digital Humanities  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Rhetoric  Religion  Associate Organizations  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  history of science  Italy  Jesuits  Material Studies 

Experiencing Death in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Ariana Ellis, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

Death saturates early modern Italian culture, from Dance of Death artwork and religious scripture to elaborate execution processions and the scaffold literature they inspired. But what did it mean to experience death? How did it look, sound, and feel? Where did the boundaries between life and death truly lie?

 

This panel is seeking papers that explore what it meant to experience death in Italy at any point during the early modern period. Analytical perspectives including: the senses, the emotions, philosophy, memorial culture, death culture, and art history are all welcome.

 

Please send proposals to the organizer (ariana.ellis@mail.utoronto.ca) by July 27th. Paper proposals must include:

 

·      Abstract (150 word maximum)

·      Paper title (15 word maximum)

·      Full name, current affiliation, and email address

·      CV (.pdf or .doc; 5 page maximum)

·      Date of PhD or terminal degree completion

       (past or expected)

 

Selected applicants will be notified as soon as possible. Please note- you must renew or activate an RSA membership to participate in the conference.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  death and gender  Death studies  Digital Humanities  emotional history  Florence  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  Memory Studies  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Sensory history  Sound studies  Urban Studies  Venice 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Gender and Death in the Late Middle Ages and Early Modernity

Posted By Enrique Fernandez, Wednesday, June 3, 2020
Gender and Death in the late middle ages and early modernity

Call for proposals on how the category of gender survived, disappeared or was transformed in contact with death in the late medieval and early modern period.

Proposal of how the differentiation based on the categories male/female was maintained, effaced or subsumed within other contemporary categories when dealing with dead bodies, their cult, conservation, etc. Discussions of how Laqueur's one-sex model is supported or undermined by social practices that compensated for the dead bodies' lack of agency to "perform" or "do gender."

Studies of wills, funeral procedures, burials, relics, anatomical dissection, representations of death and afterlife etc. are some of the documents and practices that can be analyzed in the proposal.

Send 200 word proposal by August 1 2020 to

Enrique Fernandez, enrique_fernandez@umanitoba.ca

University of Manitoba

Tags:  death and gender  History  Women and Gender 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal