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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Posted By Samantha J. Hughes-Johnson, Monday, August 3, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

(Deadline: 10 August 2020)

 

The Society for Confraternity Studies will sponsor a number of sessions at the 67thAnnual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (7- 10 April 2021) in Dublin. Accordingly, it invites proposals for papers on the following theme:

 

Contagium: Exploring the Nexus Between Confraternity, Pandemic and Renaissance Society

 

 

Since global communities are currently experiencing the liminal stage of withdrawing from varying degrees of quarantine and social isolation, the Society for Confraternity Studies is keen to scrutinize how Renaissance lay charitable institutions and sodalities grappled with the corporeal, emotional and fiscal injuries caused by society’s exposure to pandemics and epidemics and how their various actions can inform our own social, economic and psychological recuperation. Accordingly, we invite papers that explore the breadth and impact of lay sodalities operating in affected geographical areas between 1300 and 1700. Papers might focus on, but are not limited to the following topics:

  • The impact of pandemics on the restrictions of goods and humans and how quarantines, social distancing and limitations on travel affected regular confraternity operations and in turn, touched recipients of charity.
  • Legacies and donations awarded to confraternities in light of the plague. Including comparative studies of bequests during times of epidemic and good fortune and those that juxtapose geographically disparate data for the purpose of analysis.
  • The orientation of medical science and spiritual doctrine during epidemics and lay charitable institutions’ roles in this co-ordination.
  • Artistic commissions of confraternities and other lay charitable institutions and how these reflected the various injuries caused to society by outbreaks of pestilence. 
  • The impact of post-plague art, architecture, drama, music and ephemera commissioned by confraternities on public spaces and/or the popular conscience.
  • The actual and notional value of prophylactic measures designed to protect the body and soul during outbreaks and to what extent these were taken up by lay brotherhoods.
  •  Confraternity membership and how this was affected by one or more of the following: fear of mass burial; church and oratory closure; fear of the afterlife; concerns regarding spiritual conduct in the face of imminent death. 
  • The personal toll of plague on those lay brothers and sisters entrusted with public service, healthcare and the custody of people or objects.
  • The influence of pestilence on public and private confraternal ritual. 

 

Papers should concentrate on confraternal activities between 1300 and 1700. We are however, also particularly interested in proposals that discuss the value of emerging confraternity studies focusing on historical pandemics and how their findings can inform our own twenty-first century recuperation following our recent encounter with Covid 19. 

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email, the paper title (no longer than 15 words), the abstract of the paper (no longer than 150 words), a short academic C.V. (between one and five pages), and a series of key-words that suit the presentation. Please be sure all seven (7) categories of information are clearly provided. 

Please submit your proposal to Dr Samantha J.C. Hughes-Johnson at samanthajanecaroline@yahoo.co.uk by [10 August 2020].


Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  black death  bubonic plague  charity  confraternity  death and gender  Death studies  History  History of Medicine  history of science  hospitals  interdiscplinary  Italian Renaissance Art  lay sisterhoods  Material Studies  Medicine and Science  Performing Arts and Theater  piety  Religious Studies  Renaissance  renaissance medicine  ritual  Women and Gender 

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In the Margins: Hidden Thinkers and Makers in Early Modern Scientific Texts

Posted By Michelle DiMeo, Monday, July 27, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Panel Title: In the Margins: Hidden Thinkers and Makers in Early Modern Scientific Texts

Session Organizers:

Michelle DiMeo, Ph.D., Director of the Othmer Library, Science History Institute

Megan Piorko, Candidate*, Allington Postdoctoral Fellow, Science History Institute 

Early modern scientific manuscripts and printed texts are filled with material evidence of practitioners working through the technical knowledge presented on the page. When a text was subsequently copied, the knowledge created in the margins of the text was frequently subsumed into the reproduced copy, allowing readers to add to the canon of knowledge. Similarly, heavily annotated texts were shared between friends and among intellectual circles, showing that marginal notes were not at all marginal to the knowledge-making process. However, many of these readers, thinkers, and makers who contributed to advancing scientific knowledge are anonymous to us today. How does our treatment of known and unknown readers’ responses to scientific texts inform the study of early modern knowledge creation? What can we learn from early modern voices that have been relegated to the margins? What new methodologies are required for us to identify and recover these hidden thinkers and makers? Some examples of topics might include (but are in no way limited to):

• Evidence of readership and ownership of scientific texts

• Anonymous authors and annotators, especially women

• Popular culture responses to scientific texts

• Material evidence of tacit knowledge on the page

• Interaction between print and manuscript cultures

• New methodologies for history of the book scholarship that illuminate marginalized intellectual actors

This panel is sponsored by the Science History Institute, an RSA Associate Organization. Acceptance onto this panel guarantees acceptance by the RSA. 

To propose a paper, please send a paper title (15-word maximum), an abstract (150-word maximum), curriculum vitae (no longer than 5 pages; please include date of PhD expected or completed), and full name, current affiliation, and email address by August 10th to Michelle DiMeo (mdimeo@sciencehistory.org) and Megan Piorko (meganpiorko@gmail.com).

Tags:  Book History  History of Science  interdiscplinary  Materials and Materiality  Medicine and Science  Women and Gender 

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New Avenues for Processional Devotions

Posted By Mitzi Kirkland-Ives, Sunday, July 19, 2020

In the late medieval and early modern period a body of devotional practices emerged in which Christians engaged not only in contemplation of the episodes of the Passion and similar narratives but also in imaginative reenactment of those events: the Stations of the Cross in various forms, the Sorrows of the Virgin, the Falls of Christ, and related traditions. These devotions were often structured via passage from station to station across a real (or purely imagined) landscape, sometimes mapped out onto the preexisting landscape—urban streets, cloisters, church interiors—and sometimes supported by environments constructed for the purpose: Sacri monti, field chapels, and the like. This session seeks to highlight new contributions to this area of study in art history, literature, and other relevant fields of study; particularly welcome are contributions reflecting developments across a wide geographical scope including the Americas and less studied corners of Europe and the Mediterranean basin.

Please submit a title and 150 word abstract to Mitzi Kirkland-Ives (mkirklandives@missouristate.edu), as well as a two-page research c.v., by August 10, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Religion  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Visual Studies 

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Lists in Early Modern Women’s Writing: Life and Literature *extended deadline*

Posted By Nikolina Hatton, Friday, July 10, 2020
Updated: Monday, August 3, 2020

Lists proliferate in texts written by women and texts written about women, from the typical enumeration of “women worthies” within the querelle des femmes tradition to the lists of possessions and household accounts found in early modern commonplace books. Within women’s writing itself, functional everyday lists and literary lists sometimes merge, such as in Isabella Whitney’s “The Maner of her Wyll”—a poetic description of and reflection on London in the form of a Last Will and Testament.  

This panel seeks to reflect on the forms and functions of the list within early modern women’s writings and everyday lives. Literary studies has seen a recent resurgence of interest in the list, as scholars have noted the list’s ability to bring together questions of functionality and literariness. Scholars have shown that, as a form that deceptively appears simpler than it really is, the list and examinations of it shed light on the evolution and manipulation of literary conventions and can further signal important discursive distinctions between texts that at first feel otherwise quite similar. Such a project intersects well with the study of women’s writing in the early modern period, not only because lists appear so often in investigations into women’s everyday lives, but also because the corpus of literature by women is generally marked by subtle but significant deviations within the genres deemed acceptable for women writers. In material culture studies as well, the list has been hailed as an affordance for accomplishing everyday tasks as well as a container that emphasizes metonymy and materiality over metaphorical meanings. This panel seeks to open up these questions by broadly investigating the use of the list within early modern women’s utilitarian and literary writings.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send your paper’s title (max 15 words), a short abstract (150 words), your CV, and institutional affiliation/contact details to Nikolina Hatton (n.hatton@lmu.de) by 10 August 2020. A longer abstract may also be included in addition.

Tags:  Book History  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Daily Life  Diaries  Ekphrasis  English Literature  fiction  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Global Literature  History  interdiscplinary  Italian Literature  Libraries  Material Culture  Material Studies  Materiality  Memory Studies  networks  poetry  Portuguese Literature  Print  Spanish literature  Women and Gender 

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Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

Posted By Alice Brooke, Friday, July 10, 2020

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

The politics of the early modern Atlantic World are inseparable from religion. Indeed, the role of Western Christianity, both Protestant and Catholic, in nation formation and colonial expansion across the Spanish, Portuguese, English, and French-speaking worlds is indisputable. In recent decades, however, increasing attention has been paid to the multi-faceted ways in which religious literary texts were used both to uphold and to question the political status quo. In particular, scholars have highlighted the importance of non-Christian religious voices in changing our understanding of the role of literary creation as a source of resistance to dominant political narratives. This panel invites proposals that explore in new ways this relationship between religious faith and literary creation throughout the Atlantic World. In what ways was religious literature used both to affirm and to resist imperial narratives? What impact did these texts have on wider discourses of nationalism, imperialism, and expansion? How did the lives of Jews, Muslims, and other religious minorities intersect with colonialist aims? How does a deeper understanding of the presence of non-Christian voices change how we understand the relationship between religion and politics in this period? What impact do these discourses continue to have on the place of religious communities in these regions in the present day?

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alice.brooke@merton.ox.ac.uk or imogen.choi@exeter.ox.ac.uk by August 7 2020:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract
  • A single page CV

Tags:  Americas  British Empire  Comparative Literature  English Literature  eurocentrism  French Empire  French Literature  Geographies  Global Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Missions  networks  Portuguese Empire  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  theology 

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Spenser and Environmental Thinking

Posted By Debapriya Sarkar, Sunday, July 5, 2020

This panel seeks papers that bring Spenser’s writings into conversation with twentieth- and twenty-first-century environmental writing. Recent scholarship has uncovered the centrality of what we would call ecocritical thinking in Spenser’s poetry. This panel aims to expand on those conversations by placing this sixteenth-century poetry directly in conversation with recent works of fiction and non-fiction. What can texts written in our current moment of ecological crisis reveal about early modern relations of nature and culture? How might Spenserian forms—allegory, pastoral, lyric—expand our understanding of the ways in which literary texts make intelligible the “unthinkable” aspects of the Anthropocene? Papers might consider: intersections of social, ecological, and racial justice; activism and scholarship; definitions of “nature,” “human,” and “nonhuman” across different historical periods; literary worldmaking; genres of environmental literature.

This is a guaranteed panel.

Please submit the following materials to Susanne Wofford and Debapriya Sarkar at issrsa2021@gmail.com by July 25 to be considered for inclusion: paper title; abstract (150-word maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Associate Organizations  Ecocriticism  English Literature  History of Science  interdiscplinary  Medicine and Science  Spenser 

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The Burden of Blood in Early Modern Spain

Posted By Amy E. Sheeran, Thursday, June 25, 2020

Although blood, as a symbol, has always been replete with meanings, in the context of early modern Spain, it becomes uniquely potent. This panel seeks to consider blood as a category of representational analysis, following the lead of Gil Anidjar and Joan Scott. In particular, within the context of the ideology of blood purity with its attention to blood’s content, origin, and legibility, representations of blood are evocative and layered. Recent attention to the history of blood purity statutes and their influence, as well as to the role of blood in shaping national, imperial, and religious identity in Spain, prompts further analysis of blood’s discursive potential in the early modern Iberian world. In this panel, we aim to consider how representational works approach and articulate the multilayered meanings blood allows in this context. We welcome interdisciplinary submissions focused on literary, historical, or visual works that consider medical and scientific knowledge; blood and its relation to race; the role of blood in signaling or establishing class; theological questions and debates; blood as a nexus of gender and sexuality, and other related concerns.

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with a proposed title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief CV to Amy Sheeran at sheeran1@otterbein.edu and Rachel Burk at rburk@ndm.edu by August 1.

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Nobility  Religion  Spanish Empire  theology  Women and Gender 

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Renaissance Conference of Southern California CFP for RSA 2021

Posted By Sophia Q. McCabe, Friday, June 19, 2020

Call for Panel Proposals
Renaissance Society of America Conference
Dublin, Ireland, 7–10 April 2021
Renaissance Conference of Southern California (RCSC)-Sponsored Panels

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, RCSC will be sponsoring one session at next year’s RSA conference in Dublin (7–10 April 2021). We seek proposals for complete panels on any subject of the Renaissance world. Please see the details below about what is expected to propose a panel, or consult the RSA website. Per RSA rules, graduate students are permitted on panels, but they must be within 1-2 years of defending their dissertations.

Please be advised that all participants in the RSA conference are responsible for their own costs associated with travel, lodging, and registration, and must become members of the Renaissance Society of America. Participants in an RCSC-sponsored panel should also be members of RCSC.

The deadline for consideration is 30 July 2020. Please send your submission (the panel proposal and the information about each paper presenter) to the current RCSC president (barbara.mello@csulb.edu).

For a Panel proposal, you will need:

  • panel title
  • panel abstract (250 words maximum)
  • panel keywords
  • a/v requests
  • panel chair
  • respondent (optional)
  • general discipline (History, Art History, Literature, or other)

Each paper presenter must provide:

  • paper title
  • paper abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc upload) (300-word maximum)
  • Ph.D. completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Associate Organizations  interdiscplinary 

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