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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Early Modern Privacy?

Posted By Mette B. Bruun, Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Organizer: Centre for Privacy Studies, University of Copenhagen (www.teol.ku.dk/privacy)

 

Privacy is hardly a hallmark of Early Modern life. Rooms are crammed; beds are shared; doors are open; letters are copied; gossip runs wild; church and state survey the movements and mores of their subjects. Nonetheless, thresholds and boundaries do exist – be they material or immaterial ­– and they delineate spaces with regulated access, thus creating spaces with a particular potential for solitude, intimacy or a life without civic obligations.

In this panel, we will explore the terminologies, characteristics and ambience that pertain to Early Modern spaces of privacy. Perhaps such spaces are associated with terms related to ‘privacy’ or ‘the private’, and then it becomes a question how to identify the historical meaning of such terms. Perhaps such spaces are associated with emotions, activities or statuses that we think of as private or related to privacy, and it becomes a question how to avoid anachronism when dealing with them.

This panel is dedicated to spaces of privacy that are admired in poetry, explored in fiction, defined in legislation, identified in architectural plans, qualified in devotional treatises, represented in artworks, moulded in sermons or indicated in political theory. We are interested in spaces of privacy as they are built, furnished, adorned, portrayed, used, imagined, cultivated, restricted, protected, accessed, feared or lauded in the Early Modern period, and we are looking forward to learning more about scholarly approaches that enable us to grasp the complexities and historical particularities of such spaces.

To apply:

Please upload an abstract (150 words), a CV (3-5 pp) and, if relevant, a request for a travel bursary via this formhttps://teol.ku.dk/privacy/join-us/call-for-publications/panel-for-the-renaissance-society-of-america-conference-in-dublin-2021/panel/

Deadline 10 August

 

If you have questions, please contact Mette Birkedal Bruun, Professor of Church History at the University of Copenhagen and director of the Centre for Privacy Studies: mbb@teol.ku.dk

The speakers whose proposal are accepted will be expected to engage in a dialogue to enhance the cohesion of the panel.

 

Please note: Speakers must become RSA members by 1 November

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Closet Drama  Daily Life  Diaries  English Literature  Gardens  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  piety  poetics  Renaissance Architecture  sexuality  social history  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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Sponsored session: Poetry, Science, and Disciplinary Boundaries in the Italian Renaissance

Posted By Francesco Brenna, Tuesday, June 9, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2020

This will be a session sponsored by the disciplinary area of Italian Literature for the next Renaissance Society of America annual meeting (Dublin, Ireland, 7-10 April 2021). NB: there is the possibility that the RSA meeting will be held virtually: panelists should be prepared to present online.

This panel aims to examine how literary and scientific culture looked at each other in order to define their respective disciplinary limits in the Italian early modern period. How did literature react to the dawn of the new science? What precisely were the ways literature used to define its specific contribution to human learning? Was it able to delineate that which could only be learned through poems and fiction? How did science deal with the same issues when defining and placing itself within a system dominated by what we now call the humanities? To answer these questions, this panel invites papers on early modern Italian (or Italian-related) vernacular and Latin texts, including but not limited to:

  • theoretical texts (treatises on poetry, science, pedagogy, and commentaries on classical texts);
  • literary works conveying scientific notions of various kinds (e.g., pathology in Fracastoro's Syphilis sive de morbo gallico, geographical and hydrological information in Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata, and especially Gerusalemme conquistata, anatomy in Marino's Adone, and new inventions, observations on nature, and discoveries, such as those described in works by Daniello Bartoli and Giacomo Lubrano);
  • intellectuals whose output lies at the intersection of science, poetics, and philosophy, such as Galileo, Tesauro, Campanella, and Bruno.

Please send paper proposals to Francesco Brenna (fbrenna4@alumni.jh.edu) by 22 July 2020, including:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Decisions on submissions will be communicated soon after the deadline, and before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

Tags:  Bartoli  Bruno  Campanella  Comparative Literature  Fracastoro  Galileo  Marino  Medicine and Science  pedagogy  Philosophy  poetics  poetry  Rhetoric  Tasso  Tesauro 

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