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The William Nelson Prize

The RSA gives an annual award for the best article published in Renaissance Quarterly during the preceding calendar year. All peer-reviewed, accepted articles published in the journal are automatically eligible for the prize. Like all contributions to RQ, essays should appeal to readers of more than one discipline. The prize was awarded for the first time in 1985.

Recipients of the William Nelson Prize for the best article published in Renaissance Quarterly


2019 Winner

Giancarlo CasaleUniversity of Minnesota / European University Institute
“Did Alexander the Great Discover America? Debating Space and Time in Renaissance Istanbul” Vol. 72, No. 3 (2019): 863–909.


2019 Honorable mention

Richard CalisPrinceton University
“Reconstructing the Ottoman Greek World: Early Modern Ethnography in the Household of Martin Crusius.” Vol. 72, No. 1 (2019): 148–193.

 

Previous winners

  • 2018 – Virginia Cox
    “An Unknown Early Modern New World Epic: Girolamo Vecchietti’s Delle prodezze di Ferrante Cortese (1587–88)”
    Vol. 71, No. 4 (2018): 1351–1390.
  • 2018 – Andrew Gordon (honorable mention)
    “The Renaissance Footprint: The Material Trace in Print Culture from Dürer to Spenser”
    Vol. 71, No. 2 (2018): 478–529.
  • 2017 – Jessica Goethals
    “The Patronage Politics of Equestrian Ballet: Allegory, Allusion, and Satire in the Courts of Seventeenth-Century Italy and France”
    Vol. 70, No. 4 (2017): 1397–1448.
  • 2016 – Michael W. Cole and Diletta Gamberini
    “Vincenzo Danti’s Deceits”
    Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016): 1296–1342.
  • 2015 – Renée J. Raphael
    “Reading Galileo’s Discorsi in the Early Modern University”
    Vol. 68, No. 2 (2015): 558–596.
  • 2015 – Amanda Wunder (honorable mention)
    “Women’s Fashions and Politics in Seventeenth-Century Spain: The Rise and Fall of the Guardainfante
    Vol. 68, No. 1 (2015): 133–186.
  • 2014 – John Gagné
    “Counting the Dead: Traditions of Enumeration and the Italian Wars”
    Vol. 67, No. 3 (2014): 791–840.
  • 2013 – Jessica Buskirk
    “Portraiture and Arithmetic in Sixteenth-Century Bavaria: Deciphering Barthel Beham’s Calculator
    Vol. 66, No. 1 (2013): 35–80.
  • 2012 – Ewa Kocieszewska
    “War and Seduction in Cybele’s Garden: Contextualizing the Ballet des Polonais
    Vol. 65, No. 3 (2012): 809–863.
  • 2012 – Jessica Maier (honorable mention)
    “A ‘True Likeness’: The Renaissance City Portrait”
    Vol. 65, No. 3 (2012): 711–752.
  • 2011 – Stefania Tutino
    “Nothing but the Truth? Hermeneutics and Morality in the Doctrines of Equivocation and Mental Reservation in Early Modern Europe”
    Vol. 64, No. 1 (2011): 115–155.
  • 2010 – Erin J. Campbell
    “Prophets, Saints, and Matriarchs: Portraits of Old Women in Early Modern Italy”
    Vol. 63, No. 3 (2010): 807–849.
  • 2009 – Nicholas Scott Baker
    “For Reasons of State: Political Executions, Republicanism, and the Medici in Florence, 1480–1560”
    Vol. 62, No. 2 (2009): 444–478.
  • 2008 – Frances Gage
    “Exercise for Mind and Body: Giulio Mancini, Collecting, and the Beholding of Landscape Painting in the Seventeenth Century”
    Vol. 61, No. 4 (2008): 1167–1207.
  • 2007 – Kristine Louise Haugen
    “Aristotle My Beloved: Poetry, Diagnosis, and the Dreams of Julius Caesar Scaliger”
    Vol. 60, No. 3 (2007): 819–851.
  • 2006 – Anne-Laure van Bruaene
    “‘A wonderfull tryumfe, for the wynnyng of a pryse’: Guilds, Ritual, Theater, and the Urban Network in the Southern Low Countries, ca. 1450–1650”
    Vol. 59, No. 2 (2006): 374–405.
  • 2005 – Laura Camille Agoston
    “Male/Female, Italy/Flanders, Michelangelo/Vittoria Colonna”
    Vol. 58, No. 4 (2005): 1175–1219.
  • 2004 – Philip Schwyzer
    “The Beauties of the Land: Bale’s Books, Aske’s Abbeys, and the Aesthetics of Nationhood”
    Vol. 57, No. 1 (2004): 99–125.
  • 2003 – Virginia Cox (co-winner)
    “Rhetoric and Humanism in Quattrocento Venice”
    Vol. 56, No. 3 (2003): 652–694.
  • 2003 – Stephen J. Campbell (co-winner)
    “Giorgione’s Tempest, Studiolo Culture, and the Renaissance Lucretius”
    Vol. 56, No. 2 (2003): 299–332.
  • 2002 – Anthony F. D'Elia
    “Marriage, Sexual Pleasure, and Learned Brides in the Wedding Orations of Fifteenth-Century Italy”
    Vol. 55, No. 2 (2002): 379–433.
  • 2001 – Thomas M. Greene
    “Labyrinth Dances in the French and English Renaissance”
    Vol. 54, No. 4 (2001): 1403–1466.
  • 2000 – John M. Headley
    “Geography and Empire in the Late Renaissance: Botero’s Assignment, Western Universalism, and the Civilizing Process”
    Vol. 53, No. 4 (2000): 1119–1155.
  • 1999 – Geraldine A. Johnson
    “Approaching the Altar: Donatello’s Sculpture in the Santo”
    Vol. 52, No. 3 (1999): 626–666.
  • 1998 – Arthur Field
    “Leonardo Bruni, Florentine Traitor? Bruni, the Medici, and an Aretine Conspiracy of 1437”
    Vol. 51, No. 4 (1998): 1109–1150.
  • 1997 – Lyle Massey
    “Anamorphosis through Descartes or Perspective Gone Awry”
    Vol. 50, No. 4 (1997): 1148–1189.
  • 1996 – Deborah E. Harkness
    “Shows in the Showstone: A Theater of Alchemy and Apocalypse in the Angel Conversations of John Dee (1527–1608/9)”
    Vol. 49, No. 4 (1996): 707–737.
  • 1995 – Virginia Cox
    “The Single Self: Feminist Thought and the Marriage Market in Early Modern Venice”
    Vol. 48, No. 3 (1995): 513–581.
  • 1994 – Katharine Park
    “The Criminal and the Saintly Body: Autopsy and Dissection in Renaissance Italy”
    Vol. 47, No. 1 (1994): 1–33.
  • 1993 – Robert S. Miola
    “New Comedy in All’s Well That Ends Well
    Vol. 46, No. 1 (1993): 23–43.
  • 1992 – Patrick Macey
    “The Lauda and the Cult of Savonarola”
    Vol. 45, No. 3 (1992): 439–483.
  • 1991 – Ann G. Carmichael
    “Contagion Theory and Contagion Practice in Fifteenth-Century Milan”
    Vol. 44, No. 2 (1991): 213–256.
  • 1990 – Paula Findlen
    “Jokes of Nature and Jokes of Knowledge: The Playfulness of Scientific Discourse in Early Modern Europe”
    Vol. 43, No. 2 (1990): 292–331.
  • 1989 – Richard A. Goldthwaite
    “The Economic and Social World of Italian Renaissance Maiolica”
    Vol. 42, No. 1 (1989): 1–32.
  • 1988 – John Monfasani
    “The First Call for Press Censorship: Niccolò Perotti, Giovanni Andrea Bussi, Antonio Moreto, and the Editing of Pliny’s Natural History”
    Vol. 41, No. 1 (1988): 1–31.
  • 1987 – Michael H. Keefer (co-winner)
    “Agrippa’s Dilemma: Hermetic ‘Rebirth’ and the Ambivalences of De vanitate and De occulta philosophia
    Vol. 41, No. 4 (1988): 1–31.
  • 1987 – David S. Peterson (co-winner)
    “Conciliarism, Republicanism and Corporatism: the 1415-1420 Constitution of the Florentine Clergy”
    Vol. 42, No. 2 (1989): 183–226.
  • 1986 – Julie F. Codell (co-winner)
    “Giotto’s Peruzzi Chapel Frescoes: Wealth, Patronage and the Earthly City”
    Vol. 41, No. 4 (1988): 583–613.
  • 1986 – Caroline Walker Bynum (co-winner)
    “The Body of Christ in the Later Middle Ages: A Reply to Leo Steinberg”
    Vol. 39, No. 3 (1986): 399–439.
  • 1985 – Ingrid D. Rowland
    “Render Unto Caesar the Things Which are Caesar’s: Humanism and the Arts in the Patronage of Agostino Chigi”
    Vol. 39, No. 4 (1986): 673–730.
  • 1984 – David Quint
    “Humanism and Modernity: A Reconsideration of Bruni’s Dialogues
    Vol. 38, No. 3 (1985): 423–445.
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